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Aniej
Mar 14, 2007, 09:31 AM
So is the is Powerbook G4 802.11g or b? it is the 1.25GHz model.

Also, one thing I don't understand regarding the airport extreme or any airport for that matter: isn't the maximum speed going to be completely determined by how much the cable provider, Comcast, pumps out?

If this is the case, how do I determine what my transfers and speeds are looking like specifically for Comcast? And, how would an airport extreme improve upon this or any other performance aspect in this regard? Thanks very much.



epochblue
Mar 14, 2007, 09:38 AM
So is the is Powerbook G4 802.11g or b? it is the 1.25GHz model.

Also, one thing I don't understand regarding the airport extreme or any airport for that matter: isn't the maximum speed going to be completely determined by how much the cable provider, Comcast, pumps out?

If this is the case, how do I determine what my transfers and speeds are looking like specifically for Comcast? And, how would an airport extreme improve upon this or any other performance aspect in this regard? Thanks very much.

The PowerBook G4 should be G. Airport = B; Airport Extreme = G.

The speed coming into your router (and the speed you can download and surf the internet) is determined by your cable provider, but the speed between computers on your local network is determined the maximum speed of your ethernet device (100Mbps if you're wired, 54Mbps (theoretically) if you're on 802.11g).

I use the speed tests at BroadbandReports (http://www.dslreports.com/tools) to get an idea of the speed of my DSL in/out of my home. Nothing you could do to your Airport would affect your Comcast speed, unfortunately.

itsme92
Mar 14, 2007, 10:16 AM
Nothing you could do to your Airport would affect your Comcast speed, unfortunately.

Well, that depends. I have Comcast internet access and the b wireless in my Dell Dimension means that my internet on that computer is about 25% the speed that I get on my Macbook. (18mps vs. 4mps)

If you are on a b network, and have cable or fiber optics, it's worth it to upgrade to G. However, I don't think there are any connections that are faster than G yet, so an upgrade to N is not nessessary currently. (btw the only difference I see on my Dell is that it is slow(er) to download large files, if the only thing you do is load webpages, then you won't really be affected by the change.

Aniej
Mar 14, 2007, 10:22 AM
So let me add a question.

Can I simply plug in to the power outlet a airport that is separate from the linksys and place this airport in a different room so as to act as an extension to the linksys signal? I get poor coverage and wanted to boost the strength.

And, how to do so if this is possible?

epochblue
Mar 14, 2007, 10:31 AM
So let me add a question.

Can I simply plug in to the power outlet a airport that is separate from the linksys and place this airport in a different room so as to act as an extension to the linksys signal? I get poor coverage and wanted to boost the strength.

And, how to do so if this is possible?

I don't know specifically, but I know that my Airport Express will not extend my Linksys signal. I think it needs an Airport Base Station to extend.

Depending on which kind of Linksys router you have, you might be able to install a custom firmware and use the Airport as the base station and use the Linksys to extend the signal, though.

Aniej
Mar 14, 2007, 10:42 AM
should have been more specific, I have an airport base station.

epochblue
Mar 14, 2007, 10:49 AM
should have been more specific, I have an airport base station.

You can try to use the ABS as a range extender, but I was saying that if my Airport Express won't do it, I'm not holding out too much hope for the ABS doing it.

I was saying that it might work in reverse, though, if you use the Linksys as the range extender (although that might require custom firmware, which can be a bit hairy if you're not comfortable with stuff like that).