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trebblekicked
Jun 8, 2003, 07:04 PM
i was kind of inspired by Mr. Anderson's astronomy thread and the wicked thunderstorms that are raging outside my window right now, so here it is:

The Weather Thread

i consider myself a weather weenie, i love storms, clouds, tornadoes, you name it. i'll get things started with my two favorite weather events:

1. i was living on Mt. Washington in Pittsburgh when a rather weak F1-2 tornado touched down in my neighborhood. i didn't realize what was going on, so i missed the funnel cloud, et al. but after i heard what happened, i went outside and caught an amazing view of a funnel that would never touch down. IT WAS HUGE! it stretched out horizontally and i could see the rotation and everything. i wish i had a camera...

2. last summer, i was on my boat near downtown pittsburgh when a microburst/downburst ripped through the city. we got off my boat (which is a bowrider) and onto a cruiser to wait the storm out. 100mph winds, lines going down, i couldn't see from one side of the river to the other. the wind was generating 3 foot waves on the river, and the guys on board had to hold our enclosure on. we were trapped at my marina by two huge trees that blocked the only stairs out. i'll never forget that...

what about you guys? any other weather freaks? good stories?

King Cobra
Jun 8, 2003, 07:14 PM
About a year ago we were driving back to NJ from Maine, and a storm was brewing right above us. Buckets of rain and large, white ice came dropping like a boulder onto every vehicle on the highway. It was loud.

I always was afraid that if such ice came dropping down that it would go through the glass and into the cars, destroying the vehicles and the people inside. For some reason that didn't happen.

Rain and ice complied onto the side of the road.


Also, a relative family of ours suffered through the path of hurricane Andrew in 1992, and they even were in the path of the eye of the storm. They recorded the entire scene personally. I never saw it, but they know what it was like.

wdlove
Jun 8, 2003, 07:15 PM
Here in Boston during the winter season 0f '94-'95 & '96-'97 we had >100" of snow. Normal for Boston is 41.8" of snow. The record was from 150 years of record keeping. It got to be difficult to find a place to put the snow!

trebblekicked
Jun 8, 2003, 07:20 PM
Originally posted by wdlove
Here in Boston during the winter season 0f '94-'95 & '96-'97 we had >100" of snow. Normal for Boston is 41.8" of snow. The record was from 150 years of record keeping. It got to be difficult to find a place to put the snow!

wow. i remember the '94-'95 season. some strong nor'easters that winter. what about '93? we had a 3 foot snowfall in 36 hours in '93. the drifts were 6' tall. did that storm make it up to Boston?

MrMacMan
Jun 8, 2003, 07:24 PM
How about the weather currently in the North East?

What the hell like 12 Weeks of Weekend rain?

STOP RUING MY WEEKENDS! :mad:

mactastic
Jun 8, 2003, 08:00 PM
My favorite weather events happen when offshore storms bring big waves to the coast, and I can sit up on the cliffs and watch them roll in. The best is big wave season at mavericks beach, the waves will get to between 50' and 80' feet at times.

Check this guy out!
Link (http://www.mavsurfer.com/image_photo/february/pages/zach6_02_00.htm)

medea
Jun 8, 2003, 08:01 PM
I'm not a big fan of the weather here in Florida....but when I move up north (probably philadelphia) that should change.

King Cobra
Jun 8, 2003, 08:30 PM
Yo, Macman, how about the numbers for total rainfall and number of days with any rainfall?

March: <10 days
April: >10 days
May: 17 days
June: getting there...

So far we've had about 5 inches of this bullsh**, and it is not going away anytime soon.

more NJ weather (http://www.srh.noaa.gov/data/forecasts/NJZ003.php?warnzone=njz003&warncounty=njc003)

pivo6
Jun 8, 2003, 08:42 PM
Originally posted by wdlove
Here in Boston during the winter season 0f '94-'95 & '96-'97 we had >100" of snow. Normal for Boston is 41.8" of snow. The record was from 150 years of record keeping. It got to be difficult to find a place to put the snow!

Here in Minnesota, we would kill for that since we've had 3 consecutive low snowfall winters. It's affecting many of the business in my area.

When I first moved here, I thought I can handle winter. I grew up in Chicago. It can't be that bad. Well 2 months later and I'm staying overnight in Thief River Falls, MN for work and the temperature dropped to -45 degrees F. Luckily it warmed up to -20F the next morning.

iJon
Jun 8, 2003, 08:55 PM
Originally posted by King Cobra
About a year ago we were driving back to NJ from Maine, and a storm was brewing right above us. Buckets of rain and large, white ice came dropping like a boulder onto every vehicle on the highway. It was loud.

I always was afraid that if such ice came dropping down that it would go through the glass and into the cars, destroying the vehicles and the people inside. For some reason that didn't happen.

Rain and ice complied onto the side of the road.


Also, a relative family of ours suffered through the path of hurricane Andrew in 1992, and they even were in the path of the eye of the storm. They recorded the entire scene personally. I never saw it, but they know what it was like.
when my parents lived in guam, they would have bbq's in the eye of the hurricanes.

iJon

scem0
Jun 8, 2003, 09:33 PM
It snowed in Texas when I was like 6, and I tried to make a snowman.

That's about as extreme as texas weather gets im afraid. :(;)

http://www.my-smileys.de/signs/77430bbce83afc89881430e177cabb9b.png

Mr. Anderson
Jun 8, 2003, 09:34 PM
Growing up in Connecticut on the shore of Long Island Sound, we would get the opportunity to see hurricaines irregularly. And for us it was usually a fun time - not the serious storms that you see in the Carolinas, Florida and points farther south.

I remember one in the early/mid 80s that came right through our town and my brother and I were down at the beach as the eye of the storm passed over head. Very cool stuff. We sat around watching it and laughing at the idiots out in the 3-4 foot breakers body serfing. If you've ever been to any side of Long Island Sound you'd realize how amazing it was to actually have waves. On a regular day we'd be lucky to have 6" waves hit the beach.

D

mrjamin
Jun 9, 2003, 07:04 AM
well, here in the uk the most exciting weather we get is when its got and sunny.

Back in the hurricane of 1988, two huge trees went down either end of my road and we were completely stuck in for about 3 days. A few houses in my road got completely trashed. The house i was living in at the time (i was six) was a 19 century dairy - absolutely amazing house and luckily it was completely fine!

Thats about the most exciting/extreme weather we've ever had. I live in the south so i've only seen snow 2 or 3 times in my entire life (about an inch deep i think) so seeing snow would be pretty damn cool too! I've never been abroad so i've not even experienced weather in the rest of the world! I'm such a loser...

[edit: i saw fork lightening once]

wdlove
Jun 9, 2003, 10:45 AM
I agree with you on Florida weather. Don't like the heat an humidity. We have more than enough of it here in Boston. Hoping for a summer without a summer and so far I'm getting my wish! :)

mactastic
Jun 9, 2003, 10:55 AM
Its summer here now, so that means fog. Its fun to watch the tourists show up in their beach clothes with umbrellas in tow walking around in the fog shivering and asking if it's always like this in the summer. I get to tell them "Not always, just usually. Come back in the fall when the sun comes back out."

I miss the monsoon season in the southwestern desert. One month of almost nightly lightning storms. Waaay cool.

jefhatfield
Jun 10, 2003, 02:14 AM
i have heard horror stories about east coast weather- dc, ny, and boston and sometimes midwest weather, too (what happens weatherwise over there often makes major healines here in california since major storms, snow, or killer humidity does not often happen in my state to that extent)

where i live in northern california with the rainfall usually below 20 inches a year, there is little to talk about weatherwise

when i lived in the northern end of southern california, the average year produced 300 days of sunshine so that was really uneventful except for the occassional day over 100 degrees, but very low humidity so it wasn't so bad

Wardofsky
Jun 10, 2003, 02:48 AM
Melbourne weather is very cold and overcast, but when it is sunny and warm, it really is sunny can warm.

mrjamin
Jun 10, 2003, 05:11 AM
Originally posted by Wardofsky
Melbourne weather is very cold and overcast, but when it is sunny and warm, it really is sunny can warm.

i had a chat on the phone with a friend in melbourne last night - she said its really cold over your way at the moment; cold being 10 degrees.

trebblekicked
Jun 10, 2003, 01:53 PM
Originally posted by jefhatfield
i have heard horror stories about east coast weather- dc, ny, and boston and sometimes midwest weather, too (what happens weatherwise over there often makes major healines here in california since major storms, snow, or killer humidity does not often happen in my state to that extent)

where i live in northern california with the rainfall usually below 20 inches a year, there is little to talk about weatherwise

when i lived in the northern end of southern california, the average year produced 300 days of sunshine so that was really uneventful except for the occassional day over 100 degrees, but very low humidity so it wasn't so bad

wasn't the el-nino of the mid-90's a big weather-maker for you SoCal guys? my memory is kind of faded, but i think i remember lots of mudslides, accelerated erosion, basically put californians on their ears, weather wise.

we're in a good track for weather here in the midwest. currents/streams bring the violent collision weather from the plains and gulf our way, but the storms usually dissipate before they reach us, meaning we have less damage and fewer fatalities. i'm not sure my fascination with severe weather would hold if i lived in the plains or on the gulf coast.

jefhatfield
Jun 10, 2003, 07:13 PM
Originally posted by trebblekicked
wasn't the el-nino of the mid-90's a big weather-maker for you SoCal guys? my memory is kind of faded, but i think i remember lots of mudslides, accelerated erosion, basically put californians on their ears, weather wise.

we're in a good track for weather here in the midwest. currents/streams bring the violent collision weather from the plains and gulf our way, but the storms usually dissipate before they reach us, meaning we have less damage and fewer fatalities. i'm not sure my fascination with severe weather would hold if i lived in the plains or on the gulf coast.

el nino was hard on the whole state, but a lot more tolerable than any east coast weather pattern;)

i think i would never want to experience some of the stories i have heard about the dc area or atlanta, places i have heard quoted as the worst weather conditions in the lower 48

wdlove
Jun 11, 2003, 07:30 PM
Originally posted by jefhatfield
el nino was hard on the whole state, but a lot more tolerable than any east coast weather pattern;)

i think i would never want to experience some of the stories i have heard about the dc area or atlanta, places i have heard quoted as the worst weather conditions in the lower 48

Have you lived through an earthquake?

jefhatfield
Jun 11, 2003, 08:19 PM
Originally posted by wdlove
Have you lived through an earthquake?

in my 40 years, there was only one really major one in northern cal...loma prieta at 7.0 or 7.1 back in 1989...i was walking 50+ mi south of the epicenter, which in relative terms is quite close, but i did not feel a thing

there was a lesser but more damaging quake in los angeles after that in the 6 range, but it didn't shake northern cal

loma prieta released enough pressure to possibly avert a major quake in northern california for a few centuries, but southern california is due to get hit by a major quake greater than 7...so i hear...and maybe in our lifetime

wdlove
Jun 12, 2003, 02:36 PM
Originally posted by jefhatfield
in my 40 years, there was only one really major one in northern cal...loma prieta at 7.0 or 7.1 back in 1989...i was walking 50+ mi south of the epicenter, which in relative terms is quite close, but i did not feel a thing

there was a lesser but more damaging quake in los angeles after that in the 6 range, but it didn't shake northern cal

loma prieta released enough pressure to possibly avert a major quake in northern california for a few centuries, but southern california is due to get hit by a major quake greater than 7...so i hear...and maybe in our lifetime

So it sounds as though you live in a perfect area weather wise. I truly wish you continued good weather!

jefhatfield
Jun 12, 2003, 04:05 PM
Originally posted by wdlove
So it sounds as though you live in a perfect area weather wise. I truly wish you continued good weather!

thanks

i know i am very lucky when it comes to weather, so when i feel like complaining about something in my area, i think twice

though crime has increased in many areas in the state, i still feel safe compared to many urban areas in other states

the funny thing is the highest rated city in california for standard of living seems to be salinas every year in central california/northern california but it doesn't have the coolness factor of a san francisco or los angeles:p

wdlove
Jun 13, 2003, 10:16 AM
Here in New England we just celebrated the 50th Anniversary of one of our worst tornadoes. It hit Worcester, MA June 9, 1953. The winds were approxmately 300 Mph. It hit between 4:30pm to 6pm. The storm lasted 84 minutes with 94 deaths.

mactastic
Jun 13, 2003, 10:48 AM
Originally posted by jefhatfield
in my 40 years, there was only one really major one in northern cal...loma prieta at 7.0 or 7.1 back in 1989...i was walking 50+ mi south of the epicenter, which in relative terms is quite close, but i did not feel a thing

there was a lesser but more damaging quake in los angeles after that in the 6 range, but it didn't shake northern cal

loma prieta released enough pressure to possibly avert a major quake in northern california for a few centuries, but southern california is due to get hit by a major quake greater than 7...so i hear...and maybe in our lifetime

I was walking around damn near on top of it when it went. Less than 5 miles anyway. I sure felt it, I thought I was gonna get tossed off my feet. Sure was weird watching the ground ripple towards me like water. Then to get to go home and pick everything up off the floor. Including my pet fish, and pretty much all the dishes in the house.

trebblekicked
Jun 13, 2003, 01:28 PM
Originally posted by wdlove
Here in New England we just celebrated the 50th Anniversary of one of our worst tornadoes. It hit Worcester, MA June 9, 1953. The winds were approxmately 300 Mph. It hit between 4:30pm to 6pm. The storm lasted 84 minutes with 94 deaths.

that was an awful storm. NOAA called it an F4 w/ 200-250mph ext. winds. There's been all kinds of coverage of it, and in fact, the summer of '53 was the third deadliest tornado season ever. NOAA did an Anniversary page (http://www.noaanews.noaa.gov/stories/s1135.htm).

King Cobra
Jun 13, 2003, 04:31 PM
There was an earthquake back in 1986 around our home. It was mild, but nothing dangerous. I was one year old, my father saw the floor tiles vibrate, and my mother slept right through it. :D