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Queso
Apr 28, 2007, 08:44 AM
As if global warming making our weather like California's wasn't bad enough. People in Folkestone were awoken this morning by a tremor registering 4.3 on the Richter Scale. The epicentre, some 7 miles off the coast at Dover, has been responsible for earthquakes before, although you have to go back as far as the 16th century before you get one that caused any real damage.

BBC News (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/6602677.stm)

Jaffa Cake
Apr 28, 2007, 09:20 AM
This bit of the report made me smile poor Mrs Smye-Rumsby. :D

Paul Smye-Rumsby, who lives in Dover, said: "It was about 08.15 when suddenly the bed shook violently.

"I thought my wife had got cramp or something..."

Applespider
Apr 28, 2007, 10:12 AM
This bit of the report made me smile poor Mrs Smye-Rumsby. :D

That's made me giggle each time I've read it. What kind of cramps does the poor woman suffer from that her hubby would think to compare it to an earthquake...

sthpark7791
Apr 28, 2007, 11:34 AM
This bit of the report made me smile poor Mrs Smye-Rumsby. :D

Paul Smye-Rumsby, who lives in Dover, said: "It was about 08.15 when suddenly the bed shook violently.

"I thought my wife had got cramp or something..."

Haha :D That's golden.

Hope those folks are alright. I've never been in an earthquake

OwlsAndApples
Apr 28, 2007, 11:36 AM
I'm quite near to it but didn't feel a thing...then again I didn't feel the one in Dudley a while back. Or hear the explosion in Hemel Hempstead recently, and that was heard in NORWAY! :eek:

IJ Reilly
Apr 28, 2007, 11:43 AM
That's just the thing with earthquakes -- often they are felt more strongly further away from the epicenter. BTW, I thought I was hearing this morning that the official magnitude was 4.7. That's a fairly significant shaker, even by California standards.

Dagless
Apr 28, 2007, 03:43 PM
4.7 are what the Americans are saying.
4.3 are what the Brits are saying.

Some British seismologist expert really sounded like he was trying to play it down on BBC News. Then again I suppose we have so few events like this (heck I didn't even feel the Manchester shudder we had some years back) that a lot of people will be scared so it'll be nice to avoid panic.

Jaffa Cake
Apr 28, 2007, 03:48 PM
4.7 are what the Americans are saying.
4.3 are what the Brits are saying.Apparently, the initial estimate was 4.7 but after the earthquake boffins had chance to analyse the data properly they declared it as a 4.3. US reports quoting the initial estimate would explain the discrepancy.

Dagless
Apr 29, 2007, 06:22 AM
Well we all know that it was caused by warring dinosaurs deep in the Earths core.

CortexRock
Apr 29, 2007, 11:06 AM
I'm in Canterbury, which is north-east of Folkestone/Dover and I felt the tremor. A very noticeable shaking of my building, kinda like having a really heavy lorry drive past quickly (which is what I thought it was at first!).

zephead
Apr 29, 2007, 11:45 PM
So how did you Brits like your little taste of California weather and an earthquake? :p We actually haven't had an earthquake here in the Los Angeles area for a while now, maybe a year or so? Not a strong enough one that we could feel, of course.

IJ Reilly
Apr 30, 2007, 12:36 AM
So how did you Brits like your little taste of California weather and an earthquake? :p We actually haven't had an earthquake here in the Los Angeles area for a while now, maybe a year or so? Not a strong enough one that we could feel, of course.

Shush up! Don't you know talk like that can bring them on?

AndyR
Apr 30, 2007, 11:27 AM
Well we all know that it was caused by warring dinosaurs deep in the Earths core.

Would that be Denver, the last dinosaur?? Or is he still sunning it in California :D

XIII
Apr 30, 2007, 11:33 AM
I'm really pretty close and felt nothing.. oh wells.

Queso
Apr 30, 2007, 11:36 AM
Would that be Denver, the last dinosaur?? Or is he still sunning it in California :D
Denver against Barney. I hope Denver wins. Barney annoys me ;)

IJ Reilly
Apr 30, 2007, 11:38 AM
Would that be Denver, the last dinosaur?? Or is he still sunning it in California :D

In fact, he's on trial (http://www.reuters.com/article/entertainmentNews/idUSHAR96148420070430) as we speak!

Mac-Addict
Apr 30, 2007, 11:42 AM
My sister lives in canterbury and she woke to find her whole room shaking.

Jaffa Cake
Apr 30, 2007, 01:33 PM
My sister lives in canterbury and she woke to find her whole room shaking.She probably just had cramp. ;)

JMax1
May 1, 2007, 11:30 AM
4.7 are what the Americans are saying.
4.3 are what the Brits are saying.

Apparently, the initial estimate was 4.7 but after the earthquake boffins had chance to analyse the data properly they declared it as a 4.3. US reports quoting the initial estimate would explain the discrepancy.

It's because they use metric. The Metric Richter Scale is different...

IJ Reilly
May 1, 2007, 11:50 AM
It's because they use metric. The Metric Richter Scale is different...

A joke, I hope. There's only one Richter Scale (which is neither metric nor anything else).

CortexRock
May 1, 2007, 01:18 PM
I heard somewhere that only journalists use the Richter scale to measure strength of earthquakes, because it's the scale everyone is familiar with.

Apparently, geologists and seismologists use some other, more scientific/accurate scale... anyone know more about this or can 'cancel or allow' on this idea?

Wes
May 1, 2007, 02:38 PM
I heard somewhere that only journalists use the Richter scale to measure strength of earthquakes, because it's the scale everyone is familiar with.

Apparently, geologists and seismologists use some other, more scientific/accurate scale... anyone know more about this or can 'cancel or allow' on this idea?

Sounds like you are referring to this:

The moment magnitude scale was introduced in 1979 by Tom Hanks and Hiroo Kanamori as a successor to the Richter scale and is used by seismologists to compare the energy released by earthquakes:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moment_magnitude_scale

IJ Reilly
May 1, 2007, 03:28 PM
A number of earthquake measurement techniques are in use, but the Richter Scale is still very much supported.

Applespider
May 1, 2007, 03:39 PM
As if global warming making our weather like California's wasn't bad enough.

I must confess though to finding sitting in the local park in the sunshine quite enjoyable though in April... I quite like this side effect of global warming... it's the storms, additional rainfall at the wrong times and not enough at the right times so that all the grass turns yellow that's not quite so good. Will continue buying energy efficient lightbulbs etc...

The moment magnitude scale was introduced in 1979 by Tom Hanks and Hiroo Kanamori as a successor to the Richter scale

I was impressed by the guy who told us what the earthquakes in the 13th and 16th centuries were on the Richter scale... I mean... how? :confused:

CortexRock
May 2, 2007, 12:15 PM
Thanks Wes, that's the one I was thinking of... good to know someone else had heard of it!

displaced
May 5, 2007, 09:40 AM
One of our field staff at work had 60,000-worth of damage done to her house by the earthquake. Poor woman has the worst luck in the world. We once saw a new, out-of-the-box computer bluescreen as she walked past it :eek:

Still, she's taking it all with her usual glum resignation. She said that on the plus side, she doesn't mind doing lots of work all over the country for us since she'd rather be staying in hotels at the company's expense rather than having to sort out her own accommodation -- her house has been deemed unsafe.

iBlue
May 8, 2007, 06:35 AM
I'm late to reply to this but I have to post, if not only as a warning to the whole of the UK. ( :p )

I'm a Californian living in England, and I swear I bring whatever cali's got with me wherever I go. There was uncommonly pleasant weather in England for a while but it seems the quakes are coming too. There's good and bad to everything, right?

It's an ongoing joke with my family, every place I've ever moved to has had earthquakes within a year of my settling. I can't wait to tell them it applies even in England. :o

FTR, I didn't feel the earthquake, thankfully, but I've been traumatized plenty by them.

So apologies to everyone, feel free to blame me.