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Shaun.P
May 3, 2007, 05:11 PM
A couple of months ago, I decided to give blood for the first time. I walked into the blood bank in Glasgow, filled out a questionnaire, got my iron tested on copper sulphate and then gave a pint of blood. A couple of minutes after the nurse took the needle out my arm I felt very light headed, and warm!
A couple of weeks after this I got my donor card through the mail which determined that I have A- blood which is quite rare. Even after having a negative experience the first time [after feeling a bit ill after it], I decided that it was worth giving it if I only experienced 15 minutes discomfort.
So on Saturday there, I gave blood for my second time. I had nothing to eat and nothing to drink apart from around 300ml of water. When the nurse asked me before I gave blood if I had anything to eat and drink today I lied and said yes. I gave blood and after the needle was taken out and your told to sit on the chair to rest for a few minutes, my head started feeling really heavy and it was an effort to keep it up. At the same time, I also began to feel really warm all over my body. I also felt dizzy and for a few seconds felt sick. I put my head right back in the chair but it didn't help much. All I realy wished for was to be unconcious so I wouldn't have to experience the horrible feeling I was experiencing! Anyway after about 15 minutes, I felt OK. But those 15 minutes were the worst I have ever felt in my life. Part of me thinks though that I should be selfless in trying to give back to the world by going through this horrible feeling everytime I give blood, and I like the idea of giving something back to society - helping out in a way. But I'm not damaging myself by doing this am I?

The whole reason I'm posting this is just to see who else gives blood. What blood group you are. Has anyone had any negative experiences? Does anyone here really want to give blood but they are afraid?

Funnily enough the first time I gave blood I was terrified I would get a letter through the mail telling me I had HIV or something. Not that I've been doing anything unsafe to warrant getting an infection, but it was just an underlying fear and it completely put me off giving blood for years!

Shaun

Jaffa Cake
May 3, 2007, 05:16 PM
Quite a few MacRumormongers do, if the response to this thread (http://forums.macrumors.com/showthread.php?t=184444&highlight=blood) is anything to go by. :)

j26
May 3, 2007, 05:18 PM
I'm O- the universal donor, but they don't want my blood as I lived in the UK for a while and could have Mad Cow Disease.

lexus
May 3, 2007, 05:25 PM
but they don't want my blood as I lived in the UK for a while and could have Mad Cow Disease.

are you serious?

j26
May 3, 2007, 05:33 PM
Yep, because I lived in the UK for over a year, the Irish Blood Service won't accept my blood.

The ban was brought in around the time of the Mad Cow Disease scare - the Blood Transfusion Service was badly burnt a couple of years before after giving several people AIDS and was taking no chances.

yellow
May 3, 2007, 05:35 PM
Strangely I've asked most of the doctors that I see regularly what my bloodtype is and none of them know and it's not in the charts they have.

Oh, and can't give blood becasue of the meds I take.

Queso
May 3, 2007, 05:37 PM
O+ here, but I can't give blood because of Teh Ghey :)

pseudobrit
May 3, 2007, 05:42 PM
I'm on steroids.

Plymouthbreezer
May 3, 2007, 05:43 PM
Needled. Yikes.

So, no blood giving for me. I pass out when needles come near me.

pseudobrit
May 3, 2007, 05:54 PM
O+ here, but I can't give blood because of Teh Ghey :)

Needled. Yikes.

So, no blood giving for me. I pass out when needles come near me.

There's a joke here about being afraid of pricks, but I'm afraid it will offend someone everyone.

b0tt094
May 3, 2007, 06:14 PM
I would but Im not 18, I probably will then. I dont mind needles, I have already given enough blood for medical reasons to fill a little plastic 2 inch pool (I just relized how disturbing that sounds:p)

PlaceofDis
May 3, 2007, 06:20 PM
right now i can't.
hasn't been a year since my last tattoo. but i think i'll wait for the year to be up, give blood and then get more tattoo work done.

prostuff1
May 3, 2007, 06:20 PM
I have given blood once and that was back in high school for the blood drive. I ended up feeling exactly like you describe. I have not given blood since mostly because of the sick feeling. I do plan on giving blood again though soon. When i first gave blood they asked me my weight and told me that i was close to a, "you should be above this weight before you give blood" line. I am still close to that weight but i am a little heavier, so I am going to try it again. I know what to expect when i go next time so i will make sure to eat and drink a lot.

Giving blood is a good thing and something that should be done by more people. It not like our body won't make more.

nbs2
May 3, 2007, 06:23 PM
To the ARC? No.

mkrishnan
May 3, 2007, 06:30 PM
I give regularly, in the past via the Red Cross, and now via LifeSouth, because Red Cross does not collect here. O+

When the nurse asked me before I gave blood if I had anything to eat and drink today I lied and said yes. [...] But those 15 minutes were the worst I have ever felt in my life. Part of me thinks though that I should be selfless in trying to give back to the world[....]

FearFactor, I have to ask... do you not see the pattern here? I'm not sure why you have to see it as selfless sacrifice of your comfort. This is a lot less likely to happen if you actually do eat and drink before giving. Do you know what I mean?

sycho
May 3, 2007, 07:51 PM
Hehehe, 14th Plasma donation this morning for me.

iSaint
May 3, 2007, 08:12 PM
I can give double platelets (or something like that) and don't have as many side effects. Of course, if you eat a good breakfast you'll feel fine.

Kashchei
May 3, 2007, 08:25 PM
Yep, because I lived in the UK for over a year, the Irish Blood Service won't accept my blood.

The ban was brought in around the time of the Mad Cow Disease scare - the Blood Transfusion Service was badly burnt a couple of years before after giving several people AIDS and was taking no chances.

I'm in the same boat and the irony is that I'm a vegetarian. So even though I lived in England for over a year, a businessman on a weekend trip to London undoubtedly had more exposure to Mad Cow Disease and they aren't banned. This really ticks me off since I would like to give blood but am permanently banned.

mattscott306
May 3, 2007, 08:34 PM
I'm a type O- so for the past few years I've been giving blood every few months.

Sutekidane
May 3, 2007, 08:40 PM
I tried to give blood a few months back, but apparantly I can't because I'm gay. Oh well, more for me.

livingfortoday
May 3, 2007, 08:40 PM
I think we should make this one of those polls where you can see who voted for what. Just in case I need a new organ ever.

And I can't give blood for six months due to the tattoos... and the demons.

livingfortoday
May 3, 2007, 08:41 PM
Oh well, more for me.

Or for the vampires! :eek:

mattscott306
May 3, 2007, 08:41 PM
I tried to give blood a few months back, but apparantly I can't because I'm gay. Oh well, more for me.

What? I don't remember reading that on the survey.

sycho
May 3, 2007, 08:45 PM
What? I don't remember reading that on the survey.

One of the questions in Canada for males is:

Sex with another man since 1977?

For females:

Sex with a man who had sex with another man since 1977?

Stadsport
May 3, 2007, 08:46 PM
O+ here, but I can't give blood because of Teh Ghey :)

I don't know what my blood type is, but I also am infected with the gay, and therefore cannot donate blood.

Other donor characteristics are also taken into account: starting in 1985, the American Red Cross and Food and Drug Administration policies prohibit accepting blood donations from gay/bisexual men, specifically from any "male who has had sex with another male since 1977, even once,"[5]

This is, of course, despite the fact that a straight guy can literally roll off a hooker and walk into a blood donation clinic.

amacgenius
May 3, 2007, 08:47 PM
Apparently I can't according to the Red Cross donate blood because of some shots I had in my past.

That sucks, I was signed up to donate tomorrow...now I'm sad.

mattscott306
May 3, 2007, 08:47 PM
This is, of course, despite the fact that a straight guy can literally roll off a hooker and walk into a blood donation clinic.

There is a question that says: "Have you paid for sex, or had sex with anyone who has paid for sex?"

swiftaw
May 3, 2007, 08:47 PM
I can't because I lived most of my life in the UK, but even if I could, I wouldn't due to an objection to some of the rules. Specifically, even though I am straight I object to the fact that the FDA does not allow gay males to donate blood. All blood is screened before being accepted, so what does it matter. I object to this prejudice.

Stadsport
May 3, 2007, 08:48 PM
There is a question that says: "Have you paid for sex, or had sex with anyone who has paid for sex?"

I use the term "hooker" loosely ;)

Keebler
May 3, 2007, 08:51 PM
I can give double platelets (or something like that) and don't have as many side effects. Of course, if you eat a good breakfast you'll feel fine.

i'm actually calling tomorrow to donate platelets. the side affects, as you described, aren't as bad and you can donate every 2.5 or 3 weeks whereas it's every 56 days for blood. Plus, they put on a movie for you considering it takes up to 2 hours.

the best part, from what i hear.... the platelets are typically used within 2 days and go straight to dire need patients such as cancer patients (and also due to the fact that platelets don't have as long a shelf life as whole blood).

my record for pumping out a full bag of blood is just over....damn...can't remember if it's 3:34 seconds or 4 mins. All i can remember is that i pumped that damn ball so much that i had an incredibly massive bruise on my arm for 3 days :)

I beat the rest of my team though :)

iSaint
May 4, 2007, 12:52 AM
i'm actually calling tomorrow to donate platelets. the side affects, as you described, aren't as bad and you can donate every 2.5 or 3 weeks whereas it's every 56 days for blood. Plus, they put on a movie for you considering it takes up to 2 hours.


I could swear I was told to wait a longer period - like 112 days?! :confused:

I've been frustrated the past two times I've tried to give. Our local donor service uses a little bus with three people staffing it, and they get too busy and turn me away. They are, however, beginning to publish their dates in the paper further in advance.

Nermal
May 4, 2007, 01:31 AM
Yep, because I lived in the UK for over a year, the Irish Blood Service won't accept my blood.

They have the same restriction here. Not allowed to give blood if you lived in the UK for a certain amount of time (probably a year).

SkyBell
May 4, 2007, 02:03 AM
Not 18 yet (grrr.. just four more years, just four more years) And I don't know my blood type, although I know it's A something. I plan to donate once a year when I'm old enough.

amacgenius
May 4, 2007, 02:52 PM
I actually was allowed to donate today thank God - I gave a Pint of blood at our school's blood drive, it was actually kinda fun, I plan to do it as often as possible :).

vniow
May 4, 2007, 03:02 PM
Never given although it looks like I could given the screening requirements. I would however gladly take some if it was given to me...

MacPanda
May 4, 2007, 06:34 PM
they don't want my blood as i am gay.

Max Payne
May 4, 2007, 06:46 PM
I envy you. I can't give blood because I have low hemoglobin <12.

Maybe you felt the pain because you had no sugar in your blood. You need to eat before donating. Good luck next time you donate.

juanster
May 4, 2007, 06:52 PM
not alklowed if u have a recent tattoo

mattscott306
May 4, 2007, 06:54 PM
Ok here are blood donation qualification (http://www.redcross.org/services/biomed/0,1082,0_557_,00.html) guidelines.

someguy
May 4, 2007, 07:08 PM
Until this thread, I was not aware that gay men could not donate blood. It makes sense (I suppose), but I had never heard this before.

mattscott306
May 4, 2007, 07:13 PM
It makes sense (I suppose),
Why? Because of AIDs? That's a backwards rule that was made when aids was predominantly in the homosexual community, but now that it's common with all sexual preferences, that rule (IMO) is pointless.

ziwi
May 4, 2007, 07:49 PM
O+ here. I try to give regularly as it seems the proper thing to do. Every pint helps up to 3 people.

I have not yet had a negative experience while or after the donation - I usually have OJ and a carb of sorts prior and drink a ton of water after.

The qualifications are always changing the peircing / tattoo has come down to 6 months when it used to be a year. They relax the code as much as they can as there is always a need. Why not take it from everyone? Who knows - I do know the first time they take it and subsequent they do test the blood so it seems strange that there would be a limitation unless one was known to have a disease.

Give - you only have to be 'brave' the first time like going up the first hill of the coaster - the anticipation is what gets you.

someguy
May 4, 2007, 07:50 PM
Why? Because of AIDs? That's a backwards rule that was made when aids was predominantly in the homosexual community, but now that it's common with all sexual preferences, that rule (IMO) is pointless.
That makes sense as well (I suppose). :p

rockthecasbah
May 4, 2007, 09:45 PM
B positive. I donate pretty much as often as i can with the waiting period. My high school is quite good about having blood drives, we have 4/year. Spring and Fall during school, one during the winter, and one in early July.

I don't understand the reasoning behind people who refuse to give blood. Besides fears, i really see very little behind their arguments. It is painless and to me relaxing. Plus i feel good for helping in an easy way i can :)

sycho
May 4, 2007, 10:26 PM
Any one here donate Plasma? There's nothing like the feeling of your blood coming back into your arm, specially when it was the last return and it sat in the tubes for a few minutes while waiting to be unhooked.

Here is a quick run down for people that don't know how Plasma donation goes:

Blood comes out of your arm, and a saline solution is added as it is coming out. A Bowl is then filled, amount varies person to person, but once it is full, then the bowl turn into a centrifuge. The Plasma (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blood_plasma) is then collected and the red blood cells return.* A fare amount of blood remains in the tubes as to insure no air bubbles get into the blood stream (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Air_embolism). The process is repeated until approximately 515mL of Blood Plasma is collected. During the final return, the machine stops and holds some blood in the tubes, which is then fed back into you manually by the nurse and gravity.** Hold your arm where the needle was for five minutes, eat a cookie, drink some juice that you choke on because of the sugar content, and you are good to go.

* The first return feels a little weird if you haven't donated before, mainly because of the saline solution. It's hard to describe, but I guess, kinda like ants crawling on you is the best way to describe it.

** Lots of times if the nurses are busy with other people, your blood will sit out of you for a while, so when you get it back, it's kinda cold, like ice cubes going up the inside of you arm, but it goes away almost instantly.


That being said, I donate once a week. I don't get money or anything really, except a smile and some cookies.

NEENAHBOY
May 4, 2007, 11:20 PM
I can't due to my six years in the UK. My dad's O- and used to give all the time before we went over there, so he was kinda pissed about that regulation.

I don't even know my blood type, though I've always wondered.

greg555
May 4, 2007, 11:38 PM
I've donated 25 times, starting about 6 years ago. Never had a bad reaction but one time it started leaking right at the end (when they were taking the testing samples). So I had to get poked in the other arm so they could get them. Now they take the test samples right at the beginning.

Here the Canadian Blood Services questionaire (http://www.blood.ca/CentreApps/Internet/UW_V502_MainEngine.nsf/resources/Can-I-Donate/$file/01127-F020831-E.pdf)

Greg

MacPanda
May 5, 2007, 04:48 AM
are a male who has had sexual contact with another male, even once, since 1977.

well i guess that figures to you even tho most gay guys are very clean and use more protection that straight guys, if they don't want my blood it is their loss.

OwlsAndApples
May 5, 2007, 05:02 AM
A few months I'll be able to, at least I think that's the rule in the UK (17?)

Peterkro
May 5, 2007, 05:41 AM
O+ here, but I can't give blood because of Teh Ghey :)

I can't because I've had HepC (even though I'm cured),when I die they'll give me a lead lined coffin that will be soldered shut (also applies to HIV victims)not for the Ghey yet but I'm sure some people would think it's a good idea.:mad:

tominated
May 5, 2007, 05:57 AM
I can't. I have 4 1/3 years to go. I did receive blood and platelets when I was having chemotherapy for a supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal brain tumor.

Foxglove9
May 5, 2007, 07:18 AM
I don't know my bloodtype but I hope to find out soon because I'm curious.

I can't give blood because I'm on long term meds. And even in the past when I could do it, I wouldn't, because I pass out easily just from silly blood tests. Circulation problems or something.

What I do know is the last time I had blood work the person told me I have the darkest blood she's ever seen. :D

MACDRIVE
May 5, 2007, 07:45 AM
I hate the screening questions they always ask. After answering the questions, they're always left with the impression that I'm some sort of psycho-freak that takes anti-psychotic drugs and never has sex. :mad:

freebooter
May 5, 2007, 08:11 AM
I've donated maybe 15 times in Canada and liked it (i.e. no adverse reactions). I considered an affirmation of good health and an exercise in generosity. Now that I'm living in a different country (Korea) I haven't donated on the assumption that they would want my [dirty foreigner's] blood. I just decided to try and find out. :) Thanks for the thread.

someguy
May 5, 2007, 08:32 AM
I hate the screening questions they always ask. After answering the questions, they're always left with the impression that I'm some sort of psycho-freak that takes anti-psychotic drugs and never has sex. :mad:
Are you not? ;) :p

amacgenius
May 9, 2007, 07:50 AM
I hate the screening questions they always ask. After answering the questions, they're always left with the impression that I'm some sort of psycho-freak that takes anti-psychotic drugs and never has sex. :mad:

Well it's weird, because like I mentioned ours was at our school (nobody over 18) and they ask if you've ever had sexual contact with anybody from Africa, and all sorts of sexual activity questions, and most of the kids can truthfully say no to most, but yet the screener (in my case) looked at me when we were done like "this kid seems boring".

MongoTheGeek
May 9, 2007, 08:46 AM
I can't. I have 4 1/3 years to go. I did receive blood and platelets when I was having chemotherapy for a supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal brain tumor.

I have 2 years I guess. I don't know since mine recurred and was metastasized.

Andrew D.
May 9, 2007, 09:37 AM
I can't donate blood because I have an iron-deficiency disorder. I would, if I could, but I can't. Bah.

juanster
May 9, 2007, 11:43 AM
why is it that people that have lived in the UK for over a year can t give blood? i don t seem to get the idea herE?

MongoTheGeek
May 9, 2007, 12:27 PM
why is it that people that have lived in the UK for over a year can t give blood? i don t seem to get the idea herE?

TSE's. Specifically variant Creutzfield-Jacob Disease

juanster
May 9, 2007, 12:52 PM
TSE's. Specifically variant Creutzfield-Jacob Disease

ohhhhhh ok

sycho
May 9, 2007, 12:58 PM
W00T, going for donation number 15 tomorrow.

cycocelica
May 9, 2007, 01:19 PM
I think I am O+.

Although I already made a thread about this, glad to see people are promoting it still.

macmama
May 9, 2007, 08:52 PM
I've tried a few times, but was only successful once. Usually my hemoglobin level isn't high enough. Guess I should be taking some vitamins, eh?

mkrishnan
May 10, 2007, 06:44 AM
I've tried a few times, but was only successful once. Usually my hemoglobin level isn't high enough. Guess I should be taking some vitamins, eh?

Besides vitamins and meat, I understand that eating the darker greens -- esp. spinach, kale, bok choi, etc, -- is really good for iron levels. I think even things like broccoli. :) But it is one time when men have the upper hand. :p You don't have enough iron to give blood; we have too much and actually benefit for health reasons from the reduction in blood iron levels (e.g. this (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=9326996&dopt=Abstract))! :eek:

Doctor Q
May 24, 2007, 02:05 AM
FYI, here is the previous Blood Donation thread. They weren't suitable for merging because they each have a poll.

Rodimus Prime
May 24, 2007, 07:48 AM
I have donated blood once. Since then I became ineligible to donate because of some medication I started taking so it will be at least 2 years before I will be able to donated again.

Edandlindz28
May 24, 2007, 09:00 AM
I would give but I am always in a third world country every other year.

leekohler
May 24, 2007, 09:40 AM
O+ here, but I can't give blood because of Teh Ghey :)

Same here- but I don't remember what my blood type is.

xsedrinam
May 24, 2007, 12:28 PM
A- here, but can't donate since '91 because of Teh Hepatitis.
P.S. Don't drink "tintos" off the street in Bogotá, no matter what they say.

leekohler
May 24, 2007, 12:32 PM
A- here, but can't donate since '91 because of Teh Hepatitis.
P.S. Don't drink "tintos" off the street in Bogotá, no matter what they say.

Go get vaccinated. It takes care of hepatitis A and B. I got it done a few years ago. I need my liver to function as well as it can. :)

xsedrinam
May 24, 2007, 12:36 PM
Go get vaccinated. It takes care of hepatitis A and B. I got it done a few years ago. I need my liver to function as well as it can. :)
Ya, I got it treated, and the liver does regenerate, so I'm good to go. Last time I went to give blood, they got to hepatitis history, and showed me the door.

leekohler
May 24, 2007, 12:38 PM
Ya, I got it treated, and the liver does regenerate, so I'm good to go. Last time I went to give blood, they got to hepatitis history, and showed me the door.

Did you just get treated or did you get the vaccine as well?

xsedrinam
May 24, 2007, 12:43 PM
Did you just get treated or did you get the vaccine as well?
All the vaccines. They told me it didn't make any difference for donor's history. It may have changed since then but I haven't tried to donate since the mid '90s.

leekohler
May 24, 2007, 12:48 PM
All the vaccines. They told me it didn't make any difference for donor's history. It may have changed since then but I haven't tried to donate since the mid '90s.

Wow- that's so weird. I wonder why?

Keebler
May 24, 2007, 12:59 PM
well, i thought i would report on my attempt to donate blood platelets.

in a nutshell, i couldn't donate!!!! my platelet count was a little lower than they'd like to see. of course, my initial reaction was - am i ok? and she said yup..no problems. some ppl just have more platelets than other folks. kind of like having blue or brown eyes. my hemaglobin and white cell counts were through the roof and my blood pressure was 124/56 and my heart rate was 66 so i felt good about that.

I am, however, totally bummed i couldn't donate. she said to try in another 4 weeks. it could have been b/c i had worked out in the morning and i might have drank too much water...thus diluting the blood a bit. i wasn't far off the mark to donate so that could be it.

but the next time, they're going to take a sample of my blood first and run the test. i guess they don't do that for 'virgin' donaters b/c it rarely happens that a person can't donate.

and here in canada, most of the platelets goes very quickly to bone marrow transplant patients.

cheers,
Keebler

floriflee
May 24, 2007, 02:16 PM
I can't give blood. I've been banned since we lived in the UK during the mad cow scare. Hmm... maybe that explains my slow mental decline.... :p

Doctor Q
May 24, 2007, 04:17 PM
FYI: The political issue is being discussed in the FDA: Gay Blood Icky! thread.

I envy you. I can't give blood because I have low hemoglobin <12.Hemoglobin varies from hour to hour and day to day, so you might just have been ineligible at that time. Donors are encouraged to drink plenty of fluids before a donation, and ironically that reduces your hemoglobin; you don't have less of the protein (i.e., you aren't anemic), but the percentage of cells goes down from from the extra fluid.

Based on day to day variations and the amount I've had to drink, my HGB is sometimes off the charts and sometimes just enough to qualify.

Ok here are blood donation qualification (http://www.redcross.org/services/biomed/0,1082,0_557_,00.html) guidelines.Yes, those are the Red Cross guideilnes. The details of a donor questionnaire can vary from organization to organization, and that they also change over time as new concerns emerge, e.g., time spent in specific countries.

Any one here donate Plasma? I donate once a week. I don't get money or anything really, except a smile and some cookies.You are my hero.

I've donated 25 times, starting about 6 years ago.You too! Some people can't donate, and some aren't interested, so that's all the more reason for the rest of us to keep up the habit.

jayb2000
May 24, 2007, 04:34 PM
I am actually overdue to donate. I usually try to go within a week or two of being eligible. I have done 10-12 donations in the last 4 years, not sure exactly.
I like the double red donation, takes the same amount of time, only have to go 1/2 as often, and no need to sit around for 20 minutes making sure I don't pass out. :D

sycho
May 24, 2007, 05:13 PM
You are my hero.


Wow, I don't think I've been someone's hero before. Maybe you could give me a cool label under my name or something. ;) :p

Quick edit here:

I just took off the bandage from my donation today, and the scab was all suck to the gauss, so now my arm is slowly bleed. :thumbs down:

Doctor Q
May 24, 2007, 06:21 PM
Wow, I don't think I've been someone's hero before. Maybe you could give me a cool label under my name or something. ;) :pSorry, I checked the stockroom and we're fresh out of cool labels. But we have plenty of kudos left, so I can give you a bunch of them for being a good citizen. Just fill out your "Q" Kudos Application Form (http://www.kudosgroup.com/QCard/index.htm). :D

Interesting fact: Donating blood reduces your ferritin level (stored iron), and research studies appear to show that this can reduce your risk of heart disease, heart attack, and stroke. Plus you get cookies!

sycho
May 24, 2007, 06:26 PM
Sorry, I checked the stockroom and we're fresh out of cool labels. But we have plenty of kudos left, so I can give you a bunch of them for being a good citizen. Just fill out your "Q" Kudos Application Form (http://www.kudosgroup.com/QCard/index.htm). :D
Ummm, maybe later...


Interesting fact: Donating blood reduces your ferritin level (stored iron), and research studies appear to show that this can reduce your risk of heart disease, heart attack, and stroke. Plus you get cookies!

Hmmm, doesn't help me much, since I get most all of my blood back. :p Unless it is stored in the plasma, then I'm set for life!

MongoTheGeek
May 24, 2007, 08:12 PM
Interesting fact: Donating blood reduces your ferritin level (stored iron), and research studies appear to show that this can reduce your risk of heart disease, heart attack, and stroke. Plus you get cookies!

There are some people with a disease that the treatment is regular blood letting, hemochromatosis.

Doctor Q
May 25, 2007, 12:46 AM
There are some people with a disease that the treatment is regular blood letting.Right, and iron overload can be a very dangerous condition if left untreated. Meanwhile, people without hemochromatosis who receive blood transufions may also suffer from iron overload from the iron they accumulate. Removing blood (phlebotomy) can reduce iron in those with hemochromatosis, but of course wouldn't be a suitable treatment for people who require transfusions - you'd be taking out the blood you just put in!

A few times I've donated blood while somebody in the next chair was having blood taken out to reduce their iron store. The procedure is the same, but they send one unit of blood to the blood bank and dispose of the other. I hope they keep track of which is which!

Doctor Q
Jun 3, 2007, 01:01 PM
I saw a sign yesterday at a Community Center here in the Los Angeles area. It saidBlood Donations
Saturday, June 9
Drop off Donations HereI'm not making this up. It was on the south side of Ventura Blvd. in the San Fernando Valley, near Vanalden Avenue. I was driving and couldn't take a snapshot of it. Anybody live near there?

I think what they meant was that you could drop off donations for an auction or a raffle or some such event, not that you should drop off your blood, but the sign sure struck me as funny.

xsedrinam
Jun 3, 2007, 02:55 PM
I saw a sign yesterday at a Community Center here in the Los Angeles area. It saidBlood Donations
Saturday, June 9
Drop off Donations HereI'm not making this up. It was on the south side of Ventura Blvd. in the San Fernando Valley, near Vanalden Avenue. I was driving and couldn't take a snapshot of it. Anybody live near there?

I think what they meant was that you could drop off donations for an auction or a raffle or some such event, not that you should drop off your blood, but the sign sure struck me as funny.
Frightening thought for the day. :eek: :D

grafikat
Jun 3, 2007, 03:19 PM
I've given gallons over the years. It was the one way I could give back when I didn't have any money, and then it just became a habit. My right arm does have a couple of nasty divots, it you really look!

...on a side note, a gal I met at a beauty school told me she was thinking about studying lobotomy. I gave her a funny look, and she said (I'm not kidding here) "ya, you know, for taking blood and stuff?":eek:

I only donate at the local hospital now, just in case I meet up with her or someone similar!

Counterfit
Jun 3, 2007, 03:50 PM
I had to take a break from it after the last time I did. (I think it was my fourth. w00t, a half gallon! :D)
Bad idea #1: looking at the needle. I don't like watching needles go into skin. Can't watch it when I get injections, can't watch it on ER, DEFINITELY can't watch it when the needle is 1cm wide.
Bad idea #2: Okay, this wasn't a bad idea, not even an idea at all, but I did have to get stuck twice last time, as the nurse/whateverthey'recalled didn't quite get the vein in my right arm. You might think "how TF do you miss", but I would guess that it's pretty easy to not get it 100% when the needle's nearly the same diameter as the target.

I don't have to worry too much about side effects though, I've got plenty of blood to spare. Last time I went, I was asked if I wanted to donate two units of just red blood cells (I think that's what it was, it was a new thing. basically the opposite of donating plasma).

Doctor Q
Jun 3, 2007, 03:56 PM
I don't have to worry too much about side effects though, I've got plenty of blood to spare. Last time I went, I was asked if I wanted to donate two units of just red blood cells (I think that's what it was, it was a new thing. basically the opposite of donating plasma).They make me wait 56 days between whole blood donations. Exactly 56; I know because I tried to go on Day 55 once. How long do you have to wait after a double donation?

sycho
Jun 3, 2007, 04:55 PM
I don't have to worry too much about side effects though, I've got plenty of blood to spare. Last time I went, I was asked if I wanted to donate two units of just red blood cells (I think that's what it was, it was a new thing. basically the opposite of donating plasma).

Weird... Instead of taking my whole blood, they only take my plasma, and instead of wanting you whole blood, they only want your red blood cells... Why don't they just take whole blood from both of us?

Side note, here is all my goodies:
http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1026/528221921_54668c5ee1_b.jpg
http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1073/528128730_5de77009f0_b.jpg
http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1240/528128406_da95a05bd1_b.jpg
http://farm1.static.flickr.com/249/528595755_74fdf28cea_o.jpg
The iSight is crappy in low light!!!


And my arm after last week's donation...:( Still looks like this, actually, it looks worse. I'm going to go to the collection centre tomorrow as soon as they open.
(don't mind my hairiness or pantlessness... :p )

http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1216/525236399_9675ecc74a_b.jpg

Mac-Addict
Jun 3, 2007, 05:01 PM
I would give blood but I'm like 13. Heh I will most likely when I am older and feel like helping people in need of blood xD Right now I'm all too young for nearly everything apart from 12A's (PG13 I think..) Joy.


http://farm1.static.flickr.com/249/528595755_74fdf28cea_o.jpg
OMG Now I really want that shirt. I would ware it forever and walk around really smug. All the village children would shout "Ah look its Joe the super hero who saves 9 lives!" as I walked by :D, As I south "Thats right kids! Give blood. And dont do drugs."

Doctor Q
Jun 3, 2007, 05:52 PM
And my arm after last week's donation...:( Still looks like this, actually, it looks worse.At least they didn't give you a black eye!

(I have a very good memory.)

holamiamigos
Jun 3, 2007, 07:15 PM
i have given blood twice and proud of it.. they were all part of the school blood drive...first time was the regular way. but the second time was the ALYX machine... anyone use that??? its pretty cool...

sycho
Jun 3, 2007, 07:31 PM
i have given blood twice and proud of it.. they were all part of the school blood drive...first time was the regular way. but the second time was the ALYX machine... anyone use that??? its pretty cool...

Does it look anything like this:

http://farm1.static.flickr.com/197/455909442_c6c409c367_o.jpg

holamiamigos
Jun 3, 2007, 07:35 PM
yea thats exactly it

sycho
Jun 3, 2007, 08:15 PM
yea thats exactly it

I call them "The machines"...
http://www.tigress.com/incitatus/Stuff/Movies/Matrix/morpheus.JPG

holamiamigos
Jun 4, 2007, 12:22 PM
haha nice.

grafikat
Jun 4, 2007, 08:04 PM
I can't donate (or sell :p ) plasma, as my veins are too small. The problem comes when putting the separated blood back into my arm.

I've thought about bone marrow donation, but the pain factor has always scared me away.

Doctor Q
Jun 4, 2007, 09:00 PM
I've thought about bone marrow donation, but the pain factor has always scared me away.They have a newer technique that is less scary.

With the old method (a bone marrow donation), they extract marrow, usually from your hip, with you under anesthesia. The procedure doesn't hurt (you are unconscious) but you can be sore afterwards. They get the stem cells, which is what you are actually donating, from your marrow.

With the new procedure, they get the stem cells out of your bloodstream, just like a regular blood or platetlet donation. The difference is that beforehand they give you injections of "growth factors" that cause some of your stem cells to move from your bone marrow into your bloodstream, where they are easy to get at. The process seems a bit like magic, but it works.

For those willing to donate if and when a patient in need turns out to match you, here (http://www.marrow.org/HELP/Join_the_Registry/Join_in_Person/) is the information about joining the National Marrow Donor Program. I did! :)

amd4me
Jun 4, 2007, 09:25 PM
I'm A-, so screwed if I get in an accident.

Counterfit
Jun 4, 2007, 09:33 PM
They make me wait 56 days between whole blood donations. Exactly 56; I know because I tried to go on Day 55 once. How long do you have to wait after a double donation?

No clue, I only did a single of whole blood.
Weird... Instead of taking my whole blood, they only take my plasma, and instead of wanting you whole blood, they only want your red blood cells... Why don't they just take whole blood from both of us?

Well, I know that sometimes, only a unit of plasma is needed for some patients, but I guess you have a point. Why not just collect whole blood and separate the parts later? There must be some sort of problem with doing it that way...

And for the record, I'm not sure what blood type I have, (it's not even listed on my donor card :confused: ) but I think I was told it was some sort of B last time I donated.

Doctor Q
Jun 4, 2007, 10:44 PM
I used to think everyone should know their blood type "for emegencies."

But, as it turns out (at least here), they always test your blood type before giving you a transfusion, even in an emergency, so there's no reason to know it in advance. In fact, if you tell them what your blood type is at the hospital, they won't take your word for it; they'll still test it.

holamiamigos
Jun 5, 2007, 12:59 PM
so who has received blood here?

sycho
Jun 6, 2007, 08:30 PM
Picture time!!!!
http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1011/533984539_59219546ab_o.jpg
http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1173/533984583_4f030d9c11_o.jpg
http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1348/533884572_84c047f733_o.jpg

If someone can turn those into an animated gif, that would be grand. :)

http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1291/533984877_e3dd8d41a8_o.jpg
"It's feels funny!!!"

http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1172/533884914_db2f0ca2cf_o.jpg
515 CC's of Andrew right there!
Ok, that photo is being bitchy and won't rotate to the normal upright position. :(


Linky to photo's as per flickr guild lines. (http://www.flickr.com/photos/22454863@N00/sets/72157600096248686/)

Doctor Q
Jun 7, 2007, 09:49 PM
If someone can turn those into an animated gif, that would be grand. :)Thanks to forum member Blue Velvet, who helped me in another thread, here's an animated version.

holamiamigos
Jun 7, 2007, 10:22 PM
haha i think thats funny

Doctor Q
Jun 7, 2007, 10:29 PM
I think that's iodine on his arm, which is used to sterilize the skin. sycho can confirm this for us.

Occasionally there are people allergic to iodine so they use something else. I'm so used to being asked about it that they say "Are you aller-" and I interrupt to say "No, I'm not allergic to iodone."

fairnymph
Jun 9, 2007, 01:41 PM
They won't let me. :( (I don't weigh enough)

I'm in the bone marrow donor bank though, which is probably even better.

That's hilarious sycho. :D

sycho
Jun 10, 2007, 03:23 PM
Thanks to forum member Blue Velvet, who helped me in another thread, here's an animated version.

W00T!!!!

That is so fricken great. :D That will be my avatar when I can have one. :P

I think that's iodine on his arm, which is used to sterilize the skin. sycho can confirm this for us.

Yup. First and alcohol swab thingy, then the iodine. And excellent new, the bruise on my arm is not purple any more. It should be gone in a week or two. :)

cycocelica
Jun 10, 2007, 03:50 PM
Just recently they opened up a Plasma donation center in my college town. $30 per donation and you can donate twice a week. Definitely going to start doing that.

sycho
Jun 10, 2007, 03:56 PM
Just recently they opened up a Plasma donation center in my college town. $30 per donation and you can donate twice a week. Definitely going to start doing that.

Ewwww, twice a week? Honestly I am so glad that people donating in Canada aren't paid. Seems to promote honesty quite a bit. That's just how I think, give me crap if you want, but remember that I donate every week and don't get paid. ;)

cycocelica
Jun 10, 2007, 03:59 PM
Ewwww, twice a week? Honestly I am so glad that people donating in Canada aren't paid. Seems to promote honesty quite a bit. That's just how I think, give me crap if you want, but remember that I donate every week and don't get paid. ;)

Thats all well and good, but I still donate when I can and have never gotten paid. This is for plasma, not blood.

Its not like I wouldn't donate if there was no money involved, its just that the money is another incentive. I have been donating since I was able to.

sycho
Jun 10, 2007, 04:03 PM
http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1172/533884914_db2f0ca2cf_o.jpg
515 CC's of Andrew right there!
Ok, that photo is being bitchy and won't rotate to the normal upright position. :(


This is for plasma, not blood.

;)

sycho
Jun 10, 2007, 05:42 PM
Thanks to forum member Blue Velvet, who helped me in another thread, here's an animated version.

I just noticed that the first two pictures are out of order... :(

:o It goes like this:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/22454863@N00/533984539/in/set-72157600096248686/

http://www.flickr.com/photos/22454863@N00/533984583/in/set-72157600096248686/

http://www.flickr.com/photos/22454863@N00/533884572/in/set-72157600096248686/

:o So, maybe, yeah... (you guys know what I am getting at...) :o

grafikat
Jun 10, 2007, 05:55 PM
They have a newer technique that is less scary.

The process seems a bit like magic, but it works.

For those willing to donate if and when a patient in need turns out to match you, here (http://www.marrow.org/HELP/Join_the_Registry/Join_in_Person/) is the information about joining the National Marrow Donor Program. I did! :)
Thank you Q...The place I donate blood is in this program. I should have mentioned my concerns to them a long time ago!
Cheers,
Kat

displaced
Jun 10, 2007, 06:07 PM
Thursday next week will be my 19th donation according to the questionnaire I've just filled out. Type AB+ (easy to remember: "Hey, be positive!")

Mainly I go to chat with the nurses. Always manage to have a bit of a laugh with them. I rarely miss an appointment and it's got to the stage where they always send over the trainee blood nurses to 'do' me, so to speak. One girl, bless her, managed to really screw up the needle insertion. Not sure how it happened, but my blood sprayed all over her. In her surprise, she yanked the needle out sharpish (pardon the pun) and left my arm pouring copious amounts of the claret. She was very, very apologetic. I just put my finger on the puncture and asked for a steri-wipe thingy to clean myself up. At least I was wearing a red shirt...

Giving blood's got to be one of the most direct ways you can help the ill. You know that once your blood's in that bag, the next time it comes out will be for something important, whether it be research, a routine operation or during some emergency.

Plus, I love bourbon biscuits (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bourbon_Biscuit) and cheesy Quavers (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quavers) which you get for free after giving blood :)

edit: apologies if it's been posted elsewhere in the thread, but there's a nice chart of UK National Blood Service supply levels here (http://www.blood.co.uk/pages/stocklevel.html). The site's also got a load of information about how blood groups work -- who can be given what, etc.

Interestingly, despite my AB+ blood only being in 3% of the UK population, what little stock of that group they have is enough for 10 days -- much more than the larger stocks for other groups. I suppose it's because AB+ blood is only suitable for AB+ patients and there's so few of us anyway!

Doctor Q
Jun 11, 2007, 04:59 PM
there's a nice chart of UK National Blood Service supply levels here (http://www.blood.co.uk/pages/stocklevel.html).Anybody know of a page like that for the United States? I haven't found one. Maybe we just aren't that organized, or not that centralized.

Doctor Q
Jun 11, 2007, 07:56 PM
I just noticed that the first two pictures are out of order... :(Trying again...

sycho
Jun 11, 2007, 10:18 PM
Trying again...

:D Thanks.

sycho
Jun 13, 2007, 06:13 PM
I went in for my Plasma donation number 20 today. It was bad from the start. Temp on the top end of the scale, no blood coming out at first... Once it was going, not much plasma was being collected, then the return started... Oh boy that was painful. My blood didn't go into my vain and went into my tissue. They had to throw out my blood, almost as much as in a whole blood donation. :(
I can't go back for 56 days now. I got some things to think about, some choices to make in that time...

Doctor Q
Jun 13, 2007, 08:47 PM
I went in for my Plasma donation number 20 today. It was bad from the start. Temp on the top end of the scale, no blood coming out at first... Once it was going, not much plasma was being collected, then the return started... Oh boy that was painful. My blood didn't go into my vain and went into my tissue. They had to throw out my blood, almost as much as in a whole blood donation. :(
I can't go back for 56 days now. I got some things to think about, some choices to make in that time...Hey, stop that! You'll scare aware potential donors! Let me correct your post for you:
I went in for my Plasma donation number 20 today. It was great from the start. I passed all the tests and the procedure went fine. I got a big cookie and some juice and it turned out the blood was used to save the life of an adorable child.There, that's better! :D

Saluki Alex
Jun 13, 2007, 09:36 PM
A negative blood type here.

I've been donating blood since I was 16 (you can do that here if you have parental consent). The second time I donated, I actually passed out. And by "passed out" I don't mean got light-headed or hot, I mean I actually lost consciousness. I had finished donating and was sitting down eating my cookie and started to feel funny and got up and attempted to get one of the nurses but didn't quite make it.

I've kept donating though, it seems that I'm one of the few my age who does (I'm 19 going on 20). Whenever we have a blood drive on campus, I try to get my fraternity brothers out to do it since I'm our philanthropy chairman, but only a few of us donate, some of the guys can't donate and most of the others are afraid of needles.

Maybe I'm just used to it since I've been doing it for so long, or maybe because I was sick a lot as a child and am used to getting shots. But I've never understood people who are afraid of needles. This is especially the case with some of my brothers who are over 6 foot tall and pretty big guys, but they're afraid of a little needle. :rolleyes:

Doctor Q
Jun 13, 2007, 11:59 PM
But I've never understood people who are afraid of needles.What scares people is the anticipation of pain.

Which of these do you fear more? Getting an injection.
Hitting your toe on the coffee table.
Which of these hurts more? Getting an injection.
Hitting your toe on the coffee table.Typical answers: #1 and #2.

The stubbed toe hurts more, and for longer, but the encounter is over before you know it happened, so it causes no dread. But when the doctor is to give you an injection, your thought might be "oh no, unavoidable pain about to be inflicted!"

I'm no different. I cringe if I see a needle approaching someone's arm in a movie or TV show, because it's gonna hurt. But when it's my turn to get the needle, I know from experience that it's barely any discomfort. A little jab might feel like nothing or might cause a momentary sting, but it's thinking about it that is hard for people. I got over it by gritting my teeth the first few times, until I realized it was nothing to worry about.

Saluki Alex
Jun 14, 2007, 06:21 PM
What scares people is the anticipation of pain.

Which of these do you fear more? Getting an injection.
Hitting your toe on the coffee table.
Which of these hurts more? Getting an injection.
Hitting your toe on the coffee table.Typical answers: #1 and #2.

The stubbed toe hurts more, and for longer, but the encounter is over before you know it happened, so it causes no dread. But when the doctor is to give you an injection, your thought might be "oh no, unavoidable pain about to be inflicted!"

I'm no different. I cringe if I see a needle approaching someone's arm in a movie or TV show, because it's gonna hurt. But when it's my turn to get the needle, I know from experience that it's barely any discomfort. A little jab might feel like nothing or might cause a momentary sting, but it's thinking about it that is hard for people. I got over it by gritting my teeth the first few times, until I realized it was nothing to worry about.

I guess I should have clarified what I meant a little better. I don't understand people's fear in the face of helping save the lives of other people. I'm not going to say that I love the feeling of getting jabbed with a needle, but I'm glad that I can do that simple act (and yes, deal with the discomfort of the procedure) to help others in need.

What I was actually getting out when I made my initial post was the fact that usually the guys in my fraternity that won't give blood because they don't like needles are the stereotypically macho guys whom you would assume to be "man-enough**" to handle a donating blood.



**I struggled when using the phrase "man-enough" because I don't mean to convey to anyone that I'm some sort of chauvinist "frat boy." When you're in a fraternity, you often times contend with people's preconceived notions of the stereotypical frat-boy.

Shaun.P
Jul 20, 2007, 05:23 PM
Well tomorrow will be exactly 12 weeks since I last gave blood so I'm driving up to Glasgow with a friend to donate again, for the third time!

I'm going to have a filling breakfast (in other words something from the breakfast menu from Burger King) and some fresh orange juice before going to avoid feeling like I did last time.

I was on the UK 'Give Blood' website today and I would like to ask a question about something HIV related.

• Every single blood donation is tested for HIV (the virus that causes AIDS) and hepatitis B and C.
• Infected blood isn't used in transfusions but our test may not always detect the early stages of viral infection.
• The chance of infected blood getting past our screening tests is very small, but we rely on your help and co-operation."

I've always been paranoid of finding something wrong with my blood, and was just wondering, I have gave blood, waited 12 weeks gave blood and waited 12 weeks again, and am giving blood for the 3rd time tomorrow.
If anything was wrong with my blood, like HIV, it surely would have been picked up after 2 tests? How soon is your blood tested after you donate, and what is the standard procedure if they find something wrong with your blood? Do they phone you or send you out a letter?

This put me off giving blood for a while.

Shaun.P
Jul 20, 2007, 05:30 PM
Nobody is B-?

displaced
Jul 21, 2007, 04:07 PM
I was on the UK 'Give Blood' website today and I would like to ask a question about something HIV related.

I've always been paranoid of finding something wrong with my blood, and was just wondering, I have gave blood, waited 12 weeks gave blood and waited 12 weeks again, and am giving blood for the 3rd time tomorrow.
If anything was wrong with my blood, like HIV, it surely would have been picked up after 2 tests? How soon is your blood tested after you donate, and what is the standard procedure if they find something wrong with your blood? Do they phone you or send you out a letter?

Indeed, viruses such as HIV have a certain incubation time during which they'll be missed by tests. This is why it's absolutely vital that you give truthful answers to the pre-donation questionnaire. All blood is tested, but donors who have had some form of possible exposure will be scrutinised closer and for a longer period of time before it's released for use.

Blood is tested almost immediately after donation. Watch when you give blood. There's a little branch in the tube that leads from your arm to the bag. The nurse attaches a couple of those 'vacutainer' test-tubes to this branch to collect some of the blood that you're donating separate from the main bags.

These test-tubes are sent immediately for testing by the NBS. Having never had anything dangerous in my blood (other than neutropaenia, which is only dangerous to me!), I've never had the NBS contact me about my blood. I would very much imagine you'd be contacted by phone by a professional qualified to advise you about any condition you may have and what steps you should take.

This put me off giving blood for a while.

Umm... why?

Oh, I should also mention that the NBS really prefers that you do not give blood in order to find out if there's anything wrong with it. If you have any reason to believe you may have a blood disorder, see your GP. They'll be able to run a much more appropriate set of tests. Note that the NBS will test for blood conditions that would harm a recipient. It does not test for factors which could indicate a problem with some other part of the donor.

For example, the NBS's tests won't show that I've got chronic (thankfully) benign cyclic neutropaenia. They might note that my neutrophils are a little low, but it won't make my blood unusable or lead to a diagnosis of my condition. It's harmless for a recipient so it's not a problem.

Mac One
Jul 21, 2007, 05:40 PM
I've donated blood twice (I'm 16 1/2 and in NZ) and have O-. My brother also donates and is O+.

My parents don't...now...
Not because they're sad but because they live in the UK until 1980.
Once they came to NZ they donated blood for 15 years before they were told not to because of the mad cows. I mean if they've donated for 15 years, apparantly with Mad Cow disease, how much more harm can they apparantly do?

Shaun.P
Jul 22, 2007, 08:47 AM
Thanks for the help answering my questions above!

I went ahead and gave blood for the third time yesterday. I felt okay afterwards as I has a pretty descent breakfast.

I thought it would be interesting if someone (Doctor Q!) could find a way to compare the results in the forum poll about peoples' bloodgroups, compared to the National Blood Services' website on the UK population and see how much a diversity there is.

http://www.blood.co.uk/pages/all_about.html

displaced
Jul 22, 2007, 09:25 AM
Thanks for the help answering my questions above!

I went ahead and gave blood for the third time yesterday. I felt okay afterwards as I has a pretty descent breakfast.

I thought it would be interesting if someone (Doctor Q!) could find a way to compare the results in the forum poll about peoples' bloodgroups, compared to the National Blood Services' website on the UK population and see how much a diversity there is.

http://www.blood.co.uk/pages/all_about.html

No problem!

With MacRumors being an international site, drawing comparisons between the poll here and the figures on the UK NBS site would be very difficult.

Blood groups tend to be linked to racial heritage -- and not just along lines of skin colour, but the relative 'age' of your genetic make-up. For example, before the 8th Century, the entire UK population was group O. As groups of humanity migrated and bred, groups changed and developed. For example, my group, AB+ is only a few hundred years old. [edit: it's actually 500-1000 years old - I remembered wrong! Still, very recent considering the age of the human race :) ]

See http://www.blood.co.uk/pages/e14diduk.html

Plus, although it's common knowledge that the O- group is the 'universal' type that can be given to anyone, it's also really important for O+ donors to give. O+ can be given to any other Rh + group (A+, B+, AB+). AB- is also vital, since it's used as the basis for building plasma stocks.

There's also more info about blood group ages and geographic and cultural breakdowns here:
http://www.blood.co.uk/pages/world_blood.html

Doctor Q
Jul 22, 2007, 12:53 PM
Thanks for all the interesting information, displaced!

Here's a colorful comparison of the U.K. numbers and our current poll totals. I have a feeling that our sample size is a bit smaller, but here it is for what it's worth. I ignored the "Don't know" answers.

Our percentages for each blood type are within 2% of the national averages, except that we have a smaller A+ percentage (24% instead of 35%) and a larger O- percentage (14% instead of 7%).

absolut_mac
Jul 22, 2007, 01:52 PM
What blood group you are. Has anyone had any negative experiences? Does anyone here really want to give blood but they are afraid?

A+

None fortunately. Although my wife usually feels very dizzy and lightheaded afterwards.

I enjoy donating blood and hope that my blood comes in good use to those who need it. I pray that I'll never be in of a need a donation myself.

Shaun.P
Jul 22, 2007, 06:00 PM
Thank you Doctor Q. I find it very weird that according to the UK Blood Website, there is a higher chance of you being B - than AB - and yet there are 2 AB - people and no B - people!

Doctor Q
Jul 22, 2007, 06:56 PM
Thank you Doctor Q. I find it very weird that according to the UK Blood Website, there is a higher chance of you being B - than AB - and yet there are 2 AB - people and no B - people!It's a weird concept, but in a small sample we'd expect to get results that vary from the national averages, even if we were all people in the original sample.

For example, suppose you have a few different colors of socks in your dresser drawer. Mix them all up, then pick out half of them at random. What are the chances that your sample will have colors in the same proportions as the whole collection, i.e., that you'll have picked out exactly half for each color? It's rather small. If there were 6 black socks, 4 white socks, and 2 gray socks, I compute the chances at 13%.

displaced
Jul 22, 2007, 06:57 PM
Thank you Doctor Q. I find it very weird that according to the UK Blood Website, there is a higher chance of you being B - than AB - and yet there are 2 AB - people and no B - people!

It's because we're all rare gems here on MR :)

Thanks Dr. Q. I'm actually quite surprised that we're reasonably close to the UK-specific NBS figures.

The NBS site's really interesting. The fact that blood groups have 'materialised' over time was news to me. I wonder how they determined the eras during which new groups evolved and how it was that all mankind had group O during the stone-age.

I wonder if there's a possibility of another differentiating factor developing in the future?

Also, check out the Japanese Blood Type Theory of Personality (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_blood_type_theory_of_personality). Interestingly, the description of my AB group fits with the typical description of my Aquarius starsign. Probably still hocus-pocus though :D

(edit: linking through some Wikipedia pages -- which I must stop myself from doing, 'cos it's way past midnight and I've got work tomorrow -- it seems there's some debate as to which is the 'Ancestral' blood group, i.e. which was the first group present in mankind. Geneticists seem to be claiming that genes suggest that A would be the ancestral type. However, I can see that the universal nature of O- and the 'universal for Rh+ recipients) nature of O+ could be interpreted as it being the ancestral type.

All very interesting stuff... but sleep beckons :D]

Doctor Q
Aug 7, 2007, 05:05 PM
55 Facts About Blood (http://www.americasblood.org/go.cfm?do=Page.View&pid=12) (at least in the U.S.)

Doctor Q
Aug 10, 2007, 01:39 PM
When I made my latest appointment to donate blood, I was asked if I'm a "random" donor. I didn't know what that meant! Turns out it means that I'm donating to the general blood bank, not donating for a particular patient.

So I guess I'm Random Doctor Q.

* * * * *

Wanna discuss a controversy? I've been hearing differences of opinion about what blood bank policies should be about using the newest vs. oldest donated blood when a patient needs a transfusion. Suppose they have units of blood that were donated from 1 day to several weeks ago. When somebody needs a transfusion, which blood should they use?

1. If they use the oldest blood first, there is the least chance that a unit will expire without being used. Since blood is sometimes in short supply, this policy must clearly be best.

2. If they use the newest blood first, the patient may get the biggest "boost" from it. The other blood in the blood bank might not even turn out to be needed. Since it can help a patient to the maximum extent possible, this policy must clearly be best.

3. Suppose Person A needs blood during routine surgery (say a joint replacement) while Person B is regularly transfusion dependent. Person A just needs to replace some lost volume and will soon regenerate their own. Meanwhile, Person B has medical reasons to minimize the number of transfusions they get, so they would benefit from having the freshest possible blood. So Person B should get fresher blood and Person A less-fresh blood, no matter who asked first. This serves both patients well, so this policy must clearly be best.

4. But Person B makes much greater demands on the blood bank for their regular transfusions. If that one person keeps getting the freshest blood, many others are getting less-fresh blood than they would otherwise. It's not fair to favor one person over many people, so it's better to give medium-fresh blood to Person B but save the rest for all of the other people. Since this helps more people, this policy must clearly be best.

Not that easy to decide, is it? When you hear about policymakers having to make life-or-death decisions, it's usually not in the literal sense, but here's such a case!

JudgeDanny
Aug 10, 2007, 02:48 PM
I always thought my first post on this forum would be about a mac, not giving blood!!!! :)

I gave blood for the first time when I was 17 because, I was curious as to what my blood type was :)

Blood type is O+. Funny thing is, my best friend happens to be O+ too and we're always joking around about who to call for a transfusion :)

I don't go out of my way to donate so I dont donate that often, but when I see a blood drive at the gym or at work, I'm definately there :)

Besides..... donating blood is a great way to get a break from work!!! Your boss would have to be pretty cold-hearted to scream at you for it :) :p

killerrobot
Aug 10, 2007, 02:55 PM
right now i can't.
hasn't been a year since my last tattoo. but i think i'll wait for the year to be up, give blood and then get more tattoo work done.

I'm in the same boat. I had totally forgotten that it would stop me from giving blood until I showed up and they asked me the question. Yeah I know, silly me for getting clean needles stuck into me -- wait shouldn't giving blood stop you have giving blood?

Daveman Deluxe
Aug 10, 2007, 03:30 PM
I've seen the question come up regarding why you can't donate if you've been in certain countries for a number of years. The answer is that they're being mery cautious regarding Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease and variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (the human versions of bovine spongiform encephalopathy, or mad cow disease). There is NO blood test that can detect CJD or vCJD. This is why people who simply MAY have been exposed are deferred from donating.

As for HIV/gay men... last time I heard, HIV is still considerably more prevalent among gay men than among straight men (the reverse seems to be true among women, however). Since blood tests for HIV will not return a positive result until several months after an HIV infection, it makes sense to me that they would be cautious in that regard as well. Bear in mind also that straight men are asked questions regarding behavior that may put them at risk for HIV infection as well, such as soliciting prostitutes.

Anyway, for those who are deferred from donating, if you want to help the Red Cross/whatever organization, sign up as a volunteer at a donation site. They always need people to help out with giving people cookies, and helping them with their bags and all that.

As for me, I just finished with gallon #1 the other week. :D

Xfujinon
Aug 10, 2007, 03:33 PM
Due to severe anemia, I am not eligible as a blood donor. I tried to donate plasma once (slipped through the net), but it left me so sick afterwards that I never tried it again.

HOWEVER...

After having worked for more than two years in a plasma clinic, I can say without hesitation that 99.9999% of the people that go have no problems, no trouble, no side-effects of any kind. Citrate reactions and hypersensitivity reactions are so rare that I never saw one in two years of nearly full time work. Most people go in, donate, then leave without incident.

My fiance donates blood like crazy, as often as she can. I encourage everyone who is eligible to do the same. From my work in the hospital, it is evident that there is a very real need for it.

Moreover, as a researcher, it is good to have supplies to work with. During the year I work in the Leishmania laboratory here at school, experimenting with neutrophils and so forth. It is hard to find donors even for that noble service (feeding the parasites, so to speak). Research leads to progress, progress leads to an improvement in lives.

Donate blood!

\steps off podium.

sycho
Aug 10, 2007, 03:53 PM
Apparently I am able to donate plasma again. My dad said Canadian Blood Services phoned me up the other day when I was out. During my 56 day leave from donating plasma I've thought a lot about stuff, and well, I decided that I am not going to be donating plasma anymore. I was up to 20 donations, and that is plenty enough for my liking, and don't worry, I have good reasoning behind this.

Ish
Aug 10, 2007, 04:15 PM
FearFactor, I have to ask... do you not see the pattern here? I'm not sure why you have to see it as selfless sacrifice of your comfort. This is a lot less likely to happen if you actually do eat and drink before giving. Do you know what I mean?

I agree with mkrishnan - after feeling a bit ill after the first time, why did you say you'd had something to eat when asked at your second donation? It doesn't make sense to me. If you give blood on an empty stomach, you'll almost certainly feel ill.

Unless you're feeling masochistic, next time have something to eat and drink before you go and you'll probably be fine. Works for me.

2jaded2care
Aug 10, 2007, 04:37 PM
After donating at least a few gallons to the American Red Cross over the years, I stopped when I realized I was basically giving this organization a DNA sample. I don't trust them enough with that, even if they offered reassurances about how the DNA could be used. And, to my knowledge, they haven't offered.

Doctor Q
Aug 10, 2007, 04:39 PM
Unless you're feeling masochistic, next time have something to eat and drink before you go and you'll probably be fine. Works for me.I go on a drinking binge before donating. Wait, that didn't sound right. Lemme start over...

I drink lots of water and juice for many hours before donating. That makes it easier for all concerned. Sometimes I'm not very thirsty for the juice they want you to have afterwards, but I drink that too.

Afterwards, they say you shouldn't operate heavy machinery. I guess that means we should use MacBooks instead of Mac Pros for the rest of the day. :p

After donating at least a few gallons to the American Red Cross over the years, I stopped when I realized I was basically giving this organization a DNA sample. I don't trust them enough with that, even if they offered reassurances about how the DNA could be used. And, to my knowledge, they haven't offered.If they already have at least one DNA sample and plan to use that information for something without your permission, does it matter whether or not you give them more DNA samples?

2jaded2care
Aug 10, 2007, 05:05 PM
If they already have at least one DNA sample and plan to use that information for something without your permission, does it matter whether or not you give them more DNA samples?

It wouldn't, but I stopped donating several years ago. I have no idea if they would still have any samples/information from that long ago, even if they had any intention of cataloging such for any reason.

I know it seems paranoid, but I don't necessarily always trust the gov't, I certainly don't trust business, and I'm suspicious of some charities. (I still have a bit of a memory, much as I try not to use it.)

kitki83
Aug 10, 2007, 05:40 PM
Since theres a discussion about Donating blood, I accidentally arrange my blood donation to be the same day for my wisdom teeth to be removed.
How far apart should I change my blood donation, 2 weeks or 1 month? I know they made me wait 2 weeks when I had a cold last time.

Thanks

Gav
Aug 10, 2007, 05:55 PM
I can't because I'm not old enough.

Doctor Q
Aug 10, 2007, 08:24 PM
Since theres a discussion about Donating blood, I accidentally arrange my blood donation to be the same day for my wisdom teeth to be removed.
How far apart should I change my blood donation, 2 weeks or 1 month? I know they made me wait 2 weeks when I had a cold last time.

ThanksI suggest that you ask both your dental surgeon and the blood donation center.

Ish
Aug 12, 2007, 02:51 PM
I go on a drinking binge before donating. Wait, that didn't sound right. Lemme start over...

I drink lots of water and juice for many hours before donating. That makes it easier for all concerned. Sometimes I'm not very thirsty for the juice they want you to have afterwards, but I drink that too.

Afterwards, they say you shouldn't operate heavy machinery. I guess that means we should MacBooks instead of Mac Pros for the rest of the day. :p

You've obviously got it down to a fine art. If you have a juicer, there's nothing better than the juice you make yourself, with all the enzymes alive and kicking, rather than the pasturised stuff you find in the supermarket. And being British, I go for the cup of tea afterwards! I'm not fond of diluted fruit squash either. If someone's prone to feeling off-colour afterwards, it's better for them to have a cold drink though.

Do you get any acknowledgement in the States after giving a certain number of donations? In the UK they give a red and silver (coloured) badge after 25 donations, a red and gold (coloured) badge after 50 plus a pen and I think it might be a plate after 60. Nothing expensive, just a small acknowledgement and a letter of thanks.

Daveman Deluxe
Aug 12, 2007, 08:05 PM
After my eighth donation, I got a pin--eight donations is one gallon of blood. After my sixteenth, I will get a nicer pin. After twenty-four, I'll get an even nicer pin. It goes on like that.

grafikat
Aug 12, 2007, 08:26 PM
I donate to the hospital that is local to me, not to any of the "blood organizations". I also stop drinking coffee a day or so before, and really increase my fluid intake.

Doctor Q
Aug 13, 2007, 04:53 PM
Do you get any acknowledgement in the States after giving a certain number of donations?
After my eighth donation, I got a pin--eight donations is one gallon of blood. After my sixteenth, I will get a nicer pin. After twenty-four, I'll get an even nicer pin. It goes on like that.Kinda funny that they stick you, then thank you by giving you something you can stick yourself with!

After my sister reached 50 donations, she was a bit disappointed that she got no special recognition, so I bought her a donor T-shirt.

Macmaniac
Aug 15, 2007, 03:01 PM
I have done about 4-5 donations, I should do it more often. However my dad is like an all star to the Red Cross. He is O so he gets calls all the time for blood. He has donated since the 70s, I am sure he has over 100-200 donations!:eek:

Doctor Q
Aug 25, 2007, 02:46 PM
My goal is to reach 40 donated units of blood by the end of 2007. As long as I keep donating every couple of months, I will succeed. Giving myself this challenge in public will force me to do so!(That quote was from January.)

I reached my goal today! I've now donated 40 units of whole blood. :)

Now I need a new goal. How about 1,000,040 units?

rdowns
Aug 25, 2007, 02:51 PM
Nice going. I donate blood regularly as it is a regularly scheduled event in the clubhouse at the condo where I live. As I'll be moving soon, I will switch to donating at work, it is regularly scheduled in the office building.

Give blood everyone! It's important!!

squeeks
Aug 25, 2007, 09:24 PM
well, i know my girlfriend isnt going to give blood anymore, last time they did her blood test came back one half HIV positive, and thats put us through an almost two month long ordeal getting her retested, then retested again, she was negative both retests but its still be a really stressful time for us, so lets just say that was the last time either of us will give blood

Doctor Q
Oct 20, 2007, 04:55 PM
I got a great reward for donating blood this morning. I suppose helping people who need blood is a reward in itself, but I'm in it for My Personal Benefit. :D :cool: :rolleyes:

Since there was a Starbucks near the donation center, I wandered in to look for the Starbucks iTunes song of the day. I was the only customer in line and they were so friendly that they gave me the song for today and then pulled out a little box with past songs and picked out one of each for me. I got 12 songs in one fell swoop! A medical miracle!

Shaun.P
Apr 10, 2008, 10:47 AM
I gave blood again today. My 5th donation :). I have been due since January so I am a bit late...

I also joined the fast response team which basically means if they desperately need blood, they phone you to come in within 24 hours!

Anyone else been donating recently?

xUKHCx
Apr 10, 2008, 10:50 AM
I gave blood today again. My 5th donation :). I have been due since January so I am a bit late...

I also joined the fast response team which basically means if they desperately need blood, they phone you to come in within 24 hours!

Anyone else been donating recently?

If you are going regularly how does that work?

I did it a couple of weeks ago and put my name down on the bone marrow donor list and got myself an organ donation card while I was at it.

I also tried to get on the platelet donation program however my count was not high enough.

Shaun.P
Apr 10, 2008, 10:56 AM
Basically you give blood every 12 weeks as normal. If you are due (i.e. over 12 weeks) they might phone you up if there is a shortage of your blood group. They will only phone you up if you are due and they desperately need it.

I have not given platelets... I've heard it can be quite demanding on your system.

Doctor Q
Apr 10, 2008, 11:08 AM
Right. The fast response system doesn't matter for people who go as soon as they are eligible (what I try to do). But many people don't get around to it and getting that phone call will bring them in.

Even when a blood center is short, they won't skirt the rules about the frequency of donation, although they may make exceptions and let you donate sooner if you are donating for a relative. I'm not sure if they'd make that kind of exception if you are donating for a friend in need.

Giving platelets takes longer, and can make you cold during the process (they put blankets on us), but it's actually easier on the body overall since you don't lose red blood and fluid volume. You don't feel a lack of platelets. You feel normal again almost immediately. That's why you are allowed to donate platelets more often.

Shaun.P
Apr 10, 2008, 11:16 AM
Very interesting Doctor Q.

Here is an interesting article which states that giving blood is actually good for your body:

http://archives.cnn.com/2000/HEALTH/04/26/give.blood.wmd/

Maybe of interest to those who are thinking about donating!

xUKHCx
Apr 10, 2008, 11:22 AM
Interesting in the UK we are only allowed to give blood every 16 weeks (used to be 17).

This last time was the first time that I got a bruise afterwards, it was pretty big about 4 inches long and 2 wide.

Shaun.P
Apr 10, 2008, 11:23 AM
In Scotland you can donate every 12 weeks :).

juanster
Apr 10, 2008, 11:26 AM
i havent given blood for well over a year, i should probably get on that.... thx of rthe reminder

Daveman Deluxe
Apr 10, 2008, 11:50 AM
Interesting. The American Red Cross allows donations every eight weeks.

I give four times a year--my university has a blood drive every term and once during the summer.

Prof.
Apr 10, 2008, 12:48 PM
I've given a total of four pints of blood since I was in High School. I did it every year, twice a year since I was a Junior. I only did it to get out of certain classes I hated.:cool:

I'm A+ btw.

nlivo
Apr 10, 2008, 04:53 PM
I'm donating blood on Monday for the second time. I'm 16 and did as soon as I turned 16. O Positive for me.

ucfgrad93
Apr 10, 2008, 05:13 PM
Used to give a couple of times a year, but haven't given in quite awhile. I'm A+

Doctor Q
Apr 26, 2008, 06:46 PM
I wasn't supposed to do any strenuous exercise after donating blood today, but I guess they're going to arrest me for breaking that rule.

You're supposed to drink juice, eat a snack, and sit still after donating blood, and they suggest staying put for at least 15 minutes. But the guy next to me decided that 5 minutes was enough. He stood up quickly, got lightheaded, and fell to his knees. I jumped up and grabbed his shoulder to keep him from hitting his head if he fell further. The nurses took over, made sure he was OK, then helped him up and took him to lie down.

So remember to "serve your time." Eat a cookie and relax!

Shaun.P
Oct 13, 2008, 12:05 PM
Well I'm planning on donating again tomorrow. I believe this will be my seventh donation, and will secure my pledge to the Scottish National Blood Transfusion Service (they try to encourage 3 donations per year).

I would like to try and encourage a renewed interest in this thread. After all, if it encourages one person to give blood (who hasn't before), isn't it worth it?

ZiggyPastorius
Oct 13, 2008, 02:17 PM
I'm A +

This past year, I finally turned 17, and I was excited to be able to give blood, because helping to save lives is important to me. However, I was always scared about it, because I have a deathly phobia of both needles and blood. I always forget it shortly afterwards, but every time I have to get blood drawn at the hospital, I freak out. Anyways, this past time, I actually hyperventilated, then passed out while giving blood. Besides not being a good thing in and of itself, the fact of this is crushing my soul. If I can't give you little vial of blood with a tiny needle [without passing out], how am I going to manage to sit there for 10 minutes while they suck a pint out of me with a giant needle? I still want to do it so bad, I just don't know if i can.

After my sister reached 50 donations...

50...donations...?!?

:eek:

I'm getting lightheaded just reading this thread.

Mord
Oct 13, 2008, 02:24 PM
I can't for various reasons.

Doctor Q
Oct 13, 2008, 02:59 PM
50...donations...?!?

:eek:

I'm getting lightheaded just reading this thread.Sit down, put your head down near your knees, breath at a normal pace, then buy yourself something wonderful from the Apple Store. That's sure to make you feel better!

My sister's 50 donations were of platelets. You can donate platelets once or twice a week (guidelines vary), but you can donate blood only every 8 weeks because it takes longer for your body to replace them. The actual time it takes an individual probably depends on personal factors, but the donation centers I know hold to that 56-day standard for everyone.

Counterfit
Oct 13, 2008, 05:06 PM
Giving platelets takes longer, and can make you cold during the process (they put blankets on us), but it's actually easier on the body overall since you don't lose red blood and fluid volume.
I did red-cell-only last time, and I didn't get cold at all. Granted, I'm usually pretty warm anyway. They replace the red cells with saline anyway, so most people usually feel great afterwards.
Interesting. The American Red Cross allows donations every eight weeks.

16 for red-cell-only donations. I donated a few weeks ago, so now I can't until January. I'm almost halfway to a mug! :D

ZiggyPastorius
Oct 13, 2008, 07:16 PM
Sit down, put your head down near your knees, breath at a normal pace, then buy yourself something wonderful from the Apple Store. That's sure to make you feel better!

My sister's 50 donations were of platelets. You can donate platelets once or twice a week (guidelines vary), but you can donate blood only every 8 weeks because it takes longer for your body to replace them. The actual time it takes an individual probably depends on personal factors, but the donation centers I know hold to that 56-day standard for everyone.

Heh, if only there was an Apple store near here...and if only I had the money for that :)

I think I'm still going to give it a try...It's important to me, I just don't want to pass out during it or anything. I lose my calm almost instantly once I feel the needle. It's worth a shot...

SubZer0
Oct 13, 2008, 07:33 PM
AB+ here, fairly rare type that no one else can use. The good news for me is I can use virtually anybody's blood. Since it's kind of rare I get calls from time to time when they need type specific blood for a planned operation.

I have been donating blood since 2000 and started because I had a needle phobia. Call it white-coat syndrome, but has a kid I had an adverse reaction to a penicillin shot (turns out I am allergic to the stuff) which put me into a minor seizure. After that anytime a doc took a needle to me I had to warn them that I was feeling as if I was going to pass out.

The Blood Bank of Alaska has one of those motor-homes that they drive around and collect from various business locations. They showed up at work one day. So, I told my self that enough was enough and I was going to get over this phobia once and for all. I climbed aboard and gave my first pint. Since then I have no white coat syndrome at all! That and I got over the needle thing when I had to administer shots to my wife.

Before you donate, make sure that you ate a good meal AND are well hydrated. The only times I have felt strange after a donation was when I had no advance notice and did not drink some extra fluids in preparation. Other than that, there is no reason not to donate.

Anyone who doesn't donate really should...you never know when you might need it yourself.:cool:

ZiggyPastorius
Nov 19, 2008, 09:48 PM
I know it's not that special, and a lot of people do it, but I just wanted to let everyone know that despite my fears, I'm going through with my blood donating adventure. I signed up for the blood drive on the 26th, and I'm going to try it. I've been really worried because I have a tendency to pass out/hyperventilate/freak out while getting blood drawn (let alone a bigger needle, and a hell of a lot more blood). I'm hoping that someone talking to me and holding my hand will be enough to keep my mind off the needle and the blood. Hopefully, the person holding my hand won't mind hearing me explain music theory, as that would probably be the best way to keep my mind off it. What makes it more fun, is that as soon as I'm done giving blood, I'm hopping in a van for an eight-hour trip to Wisconsin. Anyways, it's been a long-time goal of mine, despite my issues, to give blood, as saving lives is important to me. My blood type is A+, I think.

Hopefully everything goes well :) Wish me luck!

dmr727
Nov 19, 2008, 09:49 PM
Good for you! Enjoy the juice and cookies!

ZiggyPastorius
Nov 19, 2008, 09:53 PM
Good for you! Enjoy the juice and cookies!

Haha! I will, if I make it out of there alive :D :P Hehe, thanks a ton.

Cave Man
Nov 19, 2008, 09:56 PM
After you're done, get your flu shot. ;)

ucfgrad93
Nov 19, 2008, 10:02 PM
After you're done, get your flu shot. ;)

Oh, man, that almost got me kicked out the library, I laughed so loud!:D

Congrats, Ziggy. You are doing a great thing. I've given blood plenty of times and for me there are 2 main problems. First, it hurts more when they take the needle out than put it in. Second, they tape some tubing to your arm and it always kills when they just yank it off along with a bunch of hair.

Try not to worry too much, and like many scary things, you might just find out it is not a big deal. Good luck and let us know how things go.

Vivid.Inferno
Nov 19, 2008, 10:02 PM
I'm not allowed to give blood, stupid laws banning Gay males.

gilkisson
Nov 19, 2008, 10:06 PM
After you're done, get your flu shot. ;)

Cave man,

I lived near Kaiserslautern for about 6 years, in the 80's. I was there when Cherynobl went blooie, and when the "mad cow" scare was getting started.

Ever since I've been back in the States, the Red Cross won't take my blood, for those two reasons. I've had some Red Crossers tell me it's for both reasons, others because I've been "exposed" to BSE in Europe in the 80's.

Have you heard anything like this?

Danke Schoen!

ZiggyPastorius
Nov 19, 2008, 10:09 PM
I'm not allowed to give blood, stupid laws banning Gay males.

Wait, this is serious? I thought i remembered hearing about some ******** law like that, and I sent my mom a text as a joke, I said "Are you sure Laura (my mom's girlfriend) can get it drawn with me? Doesn't US law prevent gays from giving blood?" I didn't realise it actually passed/was still in effect. Sigh.

Edit: I see you are in Canada. Is it the same here in the US?

Cave Man
Nov 19, 2008, 10:31 PM
I'm not allowed to give blood, stupid laws banning Gay males.

While I'm sure you take it personally, it's because of historical precedent and statistical probabilities. I'm ineligible as well, because I've traveled to one of the countries on the "no give" list. But mine is only temporary.

I lived near Kaiserslautern for about 6 years, in the 80's. I was there when Cherynobl went blooie, and when the "mad cow" scare was getting started. Ever since I've been back in the States, the Red Cross won't take my blood, for those two reasons. I've had some Red Crossers tell me it's for both reasons, others because I've been "exposed" to BSE in Europe in the 80's.

Have you heard anything like this?

Sure haven't. I know the US gov is really paranoid about the possibility of nvCJD outbreak. Bad for the cattle industry. Oh, and the people who get it, too...

Wait, this is serious? I see you are in Canada. Is it the same here in the US?

Yes, it's true for the US as well.

greg555
Nov 19, 2008, 10:32 PM
Here are all the questions they ask in Canada (every time you donate) http://blood.ca/CentreApps/Internet/UW_V502_MainEngine.nsf/resources/Can-I-Donate/$file/ROD_2008-04-24.pdf

Greg

andreab35
Nov 20, 2008, 01:26 AM
Wirelessly posted (iPhone: Mozilla/5.0 (iPhone; U; CPU iPhone OS 2_1 like Mac OS X; en-us) AppleWebKit/525.18.1 (KHTML, like Gecko) Version/3.1.1 Mobile/5F136 Safari/525.20)

Awwww that is such a nice thing to do! Good for you that you are attempting to come over your fear a bit!
I would love to donate blood, but I can't do it. I'm such a chicken. I hate needles with the passion and I can't stand tower other people getting their blood drawn!
But good luck! You'll make it out just fine! ;)

Rivix
Nov 20, 2008, 02:34 AM
Good for you! I want to donate blood one day; especially when I have a rare blood type.

anjinha
Nov 20, 2008, 04:07 AM
I hate giving blood because I have very low blood pressure and usually pass out. I still try to give blood whenever I can. :)

Legolamb
Nov 20, 2008, 08:15 AM
ZiggyPastorius, you're a good man. See "Twighlight", load a "Blood Sweat and Tears" album on your iPod, and you're good to go. :D

ZiggyPastorius
Nov 20, 2008, 09:42 AM
Wirelessly posted (iPhone: Mozilla/5.0 (iPhone; U; CPU iPhone OS 2_1 like Mac OS X; en-us) AppleWebKit/525.18.1 (KHTML, like Gecko) Version/3.1.1 Mobile/5F136 Safari/525.20)

Awwww that is such a nice thing to do! Good for you that you are attempting to come over your fear a bit!
I would love to donate blood, but I can't do it. I'm such a chicken. I hate needles with the passion and I can't stand tower other people getting their blood drawn!
But good luck! You'll make it out just fine! ;)

I'm the same way. I get lightheaded just thinking or talking about blood, getting blood drawn, needles, et cetera.

plinden
Nov 20, 2008, 11:09 AM
I'm not allowed to give blood, stupid laws banning Gay males.

And people who've lived in the UK for <mumble> length of time (because of BSE and nvCJD). I can't give blood in the US even though I did regularly before I moved here.

ayeying
Nov 20, 2008, 11:31 AM
I'm not allowed to give blood, stupid laws banning Gay males.

I feel your pain :(

Vivid.Inferno
Nov 20, 2008, 11:50 AM
I don't take it personally, although in a way it could be. I do think it is a stupid law. I wanted to be an organ donor, but now I can't be.

BlackSnow
Nov 20, 2008, 02:20 PM
Good for you. It's good you're getting over your fears. I hate needles so much, but I don't care about the blood. I might give blood too, just to see if I freak out when there a needle about to be stuck in my arm

Dagless
Nov 20, 2008, 02:46 PM
I hate giving blood because I have very low blood pressure and usually pass out. I still try to give blood whenever I can. :)

Same here, docs wanted a blood sample from me earlier this year and even just the little bit they took from that made me almost faint. Not scared of needles or anything, infact I rather like the sensation :o

wwooden
Nov 20, 2008, 03:07 PM
Giving blood is one of the most satisfying things I do. Those people really do make you feel like you're a hero and doing something great. I have the universal blood, O-, so I actually give what is called "Double Red Blood Cell" donation. Basically, they take out the regular pint, put it through a machine that separates the plasma from the red blood cells, then ti mixes the plasma was saline and sent it back into the arm; and does the process again. In the end, they only take one pint of blood, but it is a concentrated red blood cell package. It takes longer than whole blood, but I don't mind.

Only part I don't like is when the needle first goes in, after that I am fine.

Woder-Woman
Nov 20, 2008, 03:31 PM
Im not allowed to give blood either...me feel guilty every time some one gives me a leaflet on it or anything makes even though i shouldn't :(

but its a really good thing to do :D

Doctor Q
Nov 23, 2008, 04:03 PM
Im not allowed to give blood either...me feel guilty every time some one gives me a leaflet on it or anything makes even though i shouldn't :(

but its a really good thing to do :D
The way I see it, if you are willing to donate, whether or not they let you, and you help the cause by encouraging other people to donate, then you're a hero.

EricNau
Apr 9, 2009, 10:47 PM
Just gave blood for the first time today. It was a surprisingly easy process; the most painful part was waiting in line for two hours, but it was for a good cause.

For those who may be considering it, there's no reason to be afraid, I promise! :)

dmr727
Apr 9, 2009, 10:49 PM
When in college, I used to give blood every time I could. Free soda and cookies! Who can resist? :)

kellen
Apr 10, 2009, 12:24 AM
I work at a blood bank and it feels good reading about you guys wanting to donate.

Thanks for the blood and the job!

Doctor Q
Apr 10, 2009, 02:39 AM
Just gave blood for the first time today.
Hooray for you!! I give you my Good Citizen of the Day award. Even though it's night at the moment. :)

jmann
Apr 10, 2009, 02:44 AM
I can't give blood. I'm on the donor deferral list. :(

Eanair
Apr 10, 2009, 10:26 AM
I try to give blood at least once a year. I'm A+ which is rather common, but then again, that means if someone needs a transfusion, there's a good chance they'll be A+ too. :)

I've fainted straight away every time I've donated (upon standing up), but it's worth it. I faint, am unconscious for a few minutes, feel headachy and tired for several days afterwards, but I think the cons of me feeling ill are not enough to justify not giving blood that can save up to 4 people on a single donation.

Fake Hipster
Apr 10, 2009, 11:03 AM
The last time I had blood drawn I promptly collapsed in the doctors office. Now I dont want to go back...

Doctor Q
Apr 10, 2009, 11:14 AM
That explains the winner's badge!

166600

TuffLuffJimmy
Apr 10, 2009, 11:16 AM
I hate the red cross. I couldn't give blood because I've had boy on boy action in the past 42 years.

**** that. I'm squeaky clean.

I really wanted to give blood too. And I'm still curious as to what my blood type is, but now it looks like I'll never know, unless someday I need a transfusion.

r.j.s
Apr 10, 2009, 11:19 AM
I gave back in Feb., so I'm eligible again later this month ...

It's something I need to keep marking my calendar for.

xUKHCx
Apr 10, 2009, 11:20 AM
Well done Eric :)

Just as I was entering the clear stage (long term chest infection) I get another chest problem. Looks like it will be another month or two before I can go again. :(

I actually enjoy going. It is a shame there isn't a fixed centre near where I am living now. It was ever so convenient before.

Rt&Dzine
Apr 10, 2009, 10:05 PM
Good for you, to all who donate! And to those who try!

Doctor Q
Apr 27, 2009, 11:03 AM
Over the weekend I reached my personal goal: I've now donated blood 50 times. Sorry to toot my own horn, but I'm proud of myself because it took years to do this. Fifty is just a number, but working toward the 50-unit milestone helped me keep my focus on arranging my schedule for a blood donation every 2 months. You have to wait at least 56 days between donations (except in certain special circumstances), so I tried to keep the interval between my donations not much more than that.

I encourage those of you who are eligible to donate to take the time for it. If you've never donated blood, try it once. You'll be doing it for a stranger in need, but also for yourself. If you get satisfaction from helping a stranger solve a Mac problem in a forum thread, imagine how it will feel to save a life or help somebody's mom, dad, brother, sister, grandparent, or child get through a medical emergency.

Doctor Q
Apr 27, 2009, 07:19 PM
In the waiting room at the blood donation center I talked to two other blood donors and discovered something interesting.

One donor was a woman with blood type O negative, which makes her a "universal donor". Anyone with any blood type can be transfused with blood from an O- donor. The flipside is that she's the hardest to find blood for if she ever needs it, because people with blood type O- can be transfused only with blood from another O- donor.

Across from her sat a woman who was just the opposite. She was type AB, which makes her blood useful for fewer people who need blood transfusions, but makes it easier to find blood if she ever needs it. Donors who are type AB positive are "universal recipients" since they can accept blood from any blood type, but their donated blood can be used only for other AB+ patients.

When there are shortages of blood, which happens from time to time, especially around the major holidays when people are so busy, O- blood is the most critical supply to have, and O- patients are at the most risk.

EricNau
Apr 27, 2009, 07:29 PM
Well done Q! :)

I encourage those of you who are eligible to donate to take the time for it. If you've never donated blood, try it once. You'll be doing it for a stranger in need, but also for yourself. If you get satisfaction from helping a stranger solve a Mac problem in a forum thread, imagine how it will feel to save a life or help somebody's mom, dad, brother, sister, grandparent, or child get through a medical emergency.
I thought I might add a personal note to this message, because it really hit home:

My dad, while losing his battle with cancer, received blood transfusions to help offset the effects of chemotherapy and radiation, giving him the time and energy to be with me and the rest of our family. While it might not have saved a life, a perfect stranger gave me more time with my dad, and that's honestly the best gift I was ever given.

Even if it is a completely anonymous donation, and whether you're saving a life or just giving a family more time, I assure you, to them it means the world.

r.j.s
Apr 27, 2009, 07:32 PM
Congrats, Doctor Q.

I passed my 56th day last week, and will be back at the blood center here this week to give once again.

SteveMobs
Apr 27, 2009, 07:32 PM
I'm not allowed to give blood because I lived in Europe during the mad cow scare, and I ate beef.

MacGnG
Apr 27, 2009, 07:56 PM
i try and donate every chance i get... we got tshirts and food @ college blood drive :D

joshbing
Apr 27, 2009, 09:42 PM
O+
Personally id rather be a universal receiver instead of a universal donor. But at least I get free cookies and juice when I give blood =)

coronel mustard
Apr 28, 2009, 05:55 PM
It's funny how i stumbled across this thread having just sent off the form to give blood today... I have to admit that the nhs has some weird ways of convincing you to donate- i received a ransom style letter from them claiming they wanted my blood- how could i say no:rolleyes:

emt1
Apr 28, 2009, 06:09 PM
I fooled around with other boys when I was around 16, therefore I obviously have AIDS and can't donate blood.

redwarrior
Apr 28, 2009, 06:12 PM
I gave blood all the time when I worked away from home. Now, where I live, they hardly ever have blood drives. I haven't given in years. I have to admit that I am watching the papers for blood drives now. Since my son was in the hospital and given several liters of blood, I have a new appreciation for those who have donated. I'm going to give every chance I get.:)

Eanair
Apr 28, 2009, 06:42 PM
I just donated again last week. :) :)

kastenbrust
Apr 28, 2009, 07:09 PM
In the waiting room at the blood donation center I talked to two other blood donors and discovered something interesting.

One donor was a woman with blood type O negative, which makes her a "universal donor". Anyone with any blood type can be transfused with blood from an O- donor. The flipside is that she's the hardest to find blood for if she ever needs it, because people with blood type O- can be transfused only with blood from another O- donor.

Across from her sat a woman who was just the opposite. She was type AB, which makes her blood useful for fewer people who need blood transfusions, but makes it easier to find blood if she ever needs it. Donors who are type AB positive are "universal recipients" since they can accept blood from any blood type, but their donated blood can be used only for other AB+ patients.

When there are shortages of blood, which happens from time to time, especially around the major holidays when people are so busy, O- blood is the most critical supply to have, and O- patients are at the most risk.

You mean AB-, thats the rarest blood type and can recieve any blood type due to its lack of antigens, but can only be given to other people with AB-.

AB+ isnt so rare, but it has the same properties, i.e. can recieve other blood types but can only be given to other people with AB+

I donate my AB- so i can recieve preferential treatment if i ever need a blood transfusion when im ill, which is how any blood donation system should work really.

bobfitz14
Apr 28, 2009, 07:17 PM
my dad donates blood quite frequently; while i don't mind needles or getting blood drawn for the doctor i just don't like the amount of blood that they take take (i don't think i can handle it is what i'm getting at), besides i'm only 16 anyways and you ahve to be 17 in the US.

oh and in regard to the poll i have noooo idea what my blood type is:o

taylorwilsdon
Apr 28, 2009, 07:59 PM
I am excluded from giving blood because of my travels. I have donated in the past, however.

JimmyDreams
Apr 28, 2009, 10:59 PM
If the blood bank is SO sure that people who have The Ghey have tainted blood, why not let them donate into a separate bank just for Ghey afflicted people? (I'm kidding, by the way).

They test for everything anyway, why does The Ghey make any difference? Don't they have confidence in their testing???

No blood donations from me. :(

EricNau
Apr 28, 2009, 11:07 PM
To clarify, because I think some frustration has been expressed in this thread, a current FDA regulation prevents "Men Who Have Sex with Other Men" from donating; it's not up to the discretion of the blood banks, many of which openly oppose the ban (including the American Red Cross, which has petitioned the FDA to ease this regulation).

More can be read here: http://www.fda.gov/cber/faq/msmdonor.htm

TuffLuffJimmy
Apr 28, 2009, 11:48 PM
To clarify, because I think some frustration has been expressed in this thread, a current FDA regulation prevents "Men Who Have Sex with Other Men" from donating; it's not up to the discretion of the blood banks, many of which openly oppose the ban (including the American Red Cross, which has petitioned the FDA to ease this regulation).

More can be read here: http://www.fda.gov/cber/faq/msmdonor.htm
Ah that's good to know.

On another note I misread "faq" in that URL and was a little confused and miffed for a moment.

MacAndy74
Apr 29, 2009, 01:35 AM
I donate blood. :o Have to admit though, I generally feel quite flat and a bit fuzzy for about three days after.

redwarrior
Apr 29, 2009, 07:41 AM
Usually that yucky feeling, and even fainting, after giving blood is because of dehydration. A lot of people, most Americans anyway, are chronically dehydrated. Try upping your fluids a few days ahead of time and see if that doesn't help the reaction you are feeling. I fainted a couple of times after giving blood and then finally realized what was wrong with me and fixed that. I always wondered why they didn't give us juice to drink before giving as well as after.:o

EricNau
Apr 29, 2009, 11:15 AM
I always wondered why they didn't give us juice to drink before giving as well as after.:o
It can affect the accuracy of your temperature measurement.

But you're right, one should definitely hydrate oneself before giving blood; it will make the process much easier.

Kardashian
Apr 29, 2009, 11:18 AM
I'm gay.

Computer says no.

kitki83
Apr 29, 2009, 05:49 PM
I am O- which I heard is the universal blood type since I am put on a machine that gets my plates and returns my water?

Haven't donated because I can't find local places (more did not put effort) in blood banks where I work at (west Hollywood, CA) no point going to local places to my house since I get home late. Also I never have issues donating just the nurses have a hard time finding my veins @_@

Doctor Q
May 15, 2009, 06:06 PM
Question: What blood type does a pessimist have?

Answer: Be negative!

- - -

Question: What blood test result does a hypochondriac expect?

Answer: A positive!

- - -

Question: What blood type is the most surprising?

Answer: Oh!

r.j.s
May 15, 2009, 06:27 PM
Doctor Q, please stick to numbers. :D

EricNau
May 15, 2009, 07:08 PM
Meanwhile, I got my donor card in the mail a little while back.

A+ :)

SLC Flyfishing
May 15, 2009, 09:07 PM
I should check into whether or not I'm eligible now. I spent some time in Portugal in 2001 and was inneligible after that time because it was in the height of the Mad Cow Scare. It's probably been long enough now I imagine, I think I remember being told 7 years or something. I also used to be under the weight requirement and ruled out because of that.

I worked for a year in a Trauma Center, that opened my eyes big time to just how important donating blood really is! I saw a ton of people who were given a fighting chance at survival because of a pint or two of O- while the surgeons patched them up and typed and crossed their personal blood types.

I also saw a few people who "didn't have anything left in the tank" by the time they got into the hospital and subsequently died.

If you have O- blood type, it's especially important that you donate if at all possible. That's the universal that anyone can derive at least some benefit from, and is the standard first few units given in a Trauma situation.

SLC

Frisco
May 19, 2009, 05:54 PM
I just gave blood 2 weeks ago at a Work blood drive. I just got my donor card in the mail, but it says my cholesterol is 240!! I am 34--should I get my living will in order :eek:

iSaint
May 19, 2009, 07:15 PM
I just gave blood 2 weeks ago at a Work blood drive. I just got my donor card in the mail, but it says my cholesterol is 240!! I am 34--should I get my living will in order :eek:

Vytorin

Def get a checkup with blood work. That's scary. Probably genetic as well. I just take my meds and still partake in the occasional chocolate cake.

Doctor Q
May 19, 2009, 08:53 PM
I just gave blood 2 weeks ago at a Work blood drive. I just got my donor card in the mail, but it says my cholesterol is 240!! I am 34--should I get my living will in order :eek:
Some doctors use a cutoff that labels a total cholesterol of 239 as "borderline" and 240 to be "high", but it's best to be below 200, depending on HDL and LDL. You might have to give up eating brains 3 times a day, Frisco. It's not true that it makes you smarter. ;) Seriously, though, it's worth following up about it.

A couple of my friends found out that they had low blood counts when they didn't pass the screening for a blood donation. Trying to donate blood alerted them to get a proper checkup and find out what's going on.

emt1
May 19, 2009, 08:55 PM
I just gave blood 2 weeks ago at a Work blood drive. I just got my donor card in the mail, but it says my cholesterol is 240!! I am 34--should I get my living will in order :eek:

Were you fasting for 24 hours before donating blood? I doubt it.

doubleohseven
May 20, 2009, 04:04 AM
I've got no idea what blood type I am. Apparently I take after my Dad who has a rare blood type, but I'm not sure what that is. Anyway, I'm too young to give blood...I'm quite sure you have to be at least 16 or 17. When I'm older, I might do it.

kellen
May 20, 2009, 12:52 PM
Thanks again for donating. I work in the lab that sends out your units to the patients.

Sometimes we have patients who have received over 60 units in one night. Torn inferior vena cava from a car wreck if I recall.

Most people don't know its not just the blood that we use when you donate. From that one unit of blood, it is processed and can be made into many different parts. It can be spun down and separated into platelets, plasma and packed red blood cells. All from the same unit you donated.

When patients receive a "unit" of blood at the hospital, it is actually just packed RBCs at ~250ml, with 20-30ml of plasma.

nobunaga209
May 20, 2009, 01:17 PM
Funny story. I have Type O neg and wanted to give blood a few years back at a blood drive. I was born in Germany and didn't move to the states till I was a toddler. According to the blood drive nurse I am forbidden to give blood since I may have encountered Mad Cow beef at some point in my early childhood...I was like WTF? Scared the dickens out of me and went and checked with my doc...no worries from his POV. To this day though I CAN NOT give blood at blood drives because I've been 'flagged' in their system.
Oh well, guess they don't need me to help save lives....they act like I have the T-Virus or something....:rolleyes:

TuffLuffJimmy
May 20, 2009, 03:02 PM
Funny story. I have Type O neg and wanted to give blood a few years back at a blood drive. I was born in Germany and didn't move to the states till I was a toddler. According to the blood drive nurse I am forbidden to give blood since I may have encountered Mad Cow beef at some point in my early childhood...I was like WTF? Scared the dickens out of me and went and checked with my doc...no worries from his POV. To this day though I CAN NOT give blood at blood drives because I've been 'flagged' in their system.
Oh well, guess they don't need me to help save lives....they act like I have the T-Virus or something....:rolleyes:
I know right! Just one handskie and I'm off the list for life.

EricNau
May 20, 2009, 10:46 PM
Funny story. I have Type O neg and wanted to give blood a few years back at a blood drive. I was born in Germany and didn't move to the states till I was a toddler. According to the blood drive nurse I am forbidden to give blood since I may have encountered Mad Cow beef at some point in my early childhood...I was like WTF? Scared the dickens out of me and went and checked with my doc...no worries from his POV. To this day though I CAN NOT give blood at blood drives because I've been 'flagged' in their system.
Oh well, guess they don't need me to help save lives....they act like I have the T-Virus or something....:rolleyes:
The FDA vehemently protects the safety of the U.S. blood supply; for diseases like BSE (mad cow) for which their is currently no test, the "better safe than sorry" method is used. While it's true that your risk for BSE is extremely low and there's no medial reason for you to be concerned, this restriction is statistically warranted.

I know right! Just one handskie and I'm off the list for life.
That alone would not be considered sexual contact based on FDA recommendations. Naturally, you would need to check with the specific blood collection agency as they each have their own set of restrictions.

TuffLuffJimmy
May 20, 2009, 10:49 PM
That alone would not be considered sexual contact based on FDA recommendations. Naturally, you would need to check with the specific blood collection agency as they each have their own set of restrictions.
Meh, no use in checking now. I'm already on the list and I've done a lot more since that...

xUKHCx
Oct 2, 2009, 03:54 PM
I gave blood today, anybody who wants to see the needle in my arm feel free to click the link -> Needles and blood. (http://rabbitandspider.com/photo.jpg)