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hockey6773
Mar 19, 2002, 12:18 PM
How do you replace a hard drive in a imac 350? If possible pictures would help

King Cobra
Mar 19, 2002, 04:07 PM
Try this website.

http://www.macworld.com/2001/10/howto/imac.html

My father gets a subscription to Macworld, and I read through the magazine article quickly.
__________________

It does not take a genius to figure it out . . . just someone who uses a Mac.

mac15
Mar 19, 2002, 10:50 PM
they say its easy but it pretty difficult
since its out of warranty go to your apple store and chck it out there

IndyGopher
Mar 19, 2002, 11:05 PM
Ummm... don't have any pictures.. but it's not hard.

Pull the vented cover off the VGA connector area.
remove the 4 screws that hold on the bottom (2 by the flipper foot, 2 under the VGA cover)
remove the 6 screws that hold on the vented shield (4 around the edges, 2 on the drive cage)
remove the 4 screws that hold the hard drive in.
remove the 2 cables. (data and power)
Put the new drive in (make sure it's jumpered for master)
put all the screws and pieces back (reverse order)

Should have taken about 5 minutes with an electric screwdriver, maybe 10 without. Boot off your restore CD, and follow the instructions on the screen.

One caveat, if you have the Original Apple RAM in there, you may need to remove it to get the vented shield off without distorting its shape. The DIMMs Apple used in the older iMacs are the tallest I have seen in years. Same goes for an Airport card, but I don't think that was even an option in the 350's

eyelikeart
Mar 19, 2002, 11:38 PM
it's really not a big deal to replace any parts in an iMac.... :o it's just tedious...

they require a bit of work to get apart....lots of screws....making sure to put the correct ones back where they belong....

since u have a 350 I'm assuming it's a slot-load? be thankful u don't have the tray....those take a little figuring out to get back together....

take note from IndyGopher and u should be fine...

MacAztec
Mar 20, 2002, 12:02 AM
I dont think it will be that hard. Yes, you are lucky you have a slot-loader. I dont think I would even TRY it on my iMac 333.

I think you can get instructions from xlr8yourmac.com or MAYBE apple, you will have to look in to it.

IndyGopher
Mar 20, 2002, 01:27 AM
The tray loaders (like the 333 previously mentioned) are not difficult to work on, but EyeLikeArt nailed it with the word tedious. Most of the time I spend dismantling the 233-333 iMacs is consumed with muttering and disparaging the supposed industrial design genius people keep cooing about. For comparison, replacing the hard drive in a tray-loader takes about 20 minutes... every bit of 3 to 4 times as long as the slot-loaders. So I guess we have to salute Apple's ability to IMPROVE their designs. (And the worst Mac on Earth is still more pleasant to work with than the best PC.. not that I am biased or anything.)

PB180
Mar 20, 2002, 02:03 AM
I tried to add more RAM to my Bondi iMac (Rev A)- after reading instructions, I'm glad that I paid the extra money to watch someone else do it! That was certainly one of Apple's worst designs ever for do-it-yourself upgrades.

I too would love to add a bigger hard drive, but it's just not worth the aggravation for a 4 year old computer. I just wish I had firewire or SCSI so I could add an external!

whfsdude
Mar 20, 2002, 05:03 AM
I took the powerboard out, it's fried but frieds fixing it :-)

hockey6773
Mar 20, 2002, 11:58 AM
Originally posted by PB180
I tried to add more RAM to my Bondi iMac (Rev A)- after reading instructions, I'm glad that I paid the extra money to watch someone else do it! That was certainly one of Apple's worst designs ever for do-it-yourself upgrades.

I too would love to add a bigger hard drive, but it's just not worth the aggravation for a 4 year old computer. I just wish I had firewire or SCSI so I could add an external!

really i have a imac snow and i thought replacing the RAM was easy

eyelikeart
Mar 20, 2002, 12:29 PM
Originally posted by hockey6773


really i have a imac snow and i thought replacing the RAM was easy

the Bondi Blue Rev. A is the tray-load we're talking about....your Snow I think is slot-load...

I have only worked on the Rev. A iMac...with tray...RAM was actually kinda easy....I did have to downloaed instructions from the net on how to disassemble it though...he he he...:p

IndyGopher
Mar 20, 2002, 01:12 PM
One of the other techs here at work (purely a PC person.. and barely, at that) tried to install memory in one of the Rev. A Bondi's.. got it open ok, even firgured out the less-than-intuitive disembowelling procedure.. got in there and promptly forced the memory into the VRAM explansion slot. So if you have any use for a broken SO-DIMM or a damaged iMac Rev. A motherboard, he's your guy... so while it seems really simple after you've done it.. I guess there is plenty of room to screw up if you aren't familiar with it. Besides, once you get inside a Rev. A/B/C/D iMac, the amount of laptop-ness is very amusing.

AlphaTech
Mar 20, 2002, 01:21 PM
The hardest part about installing parts into the Rev. A and B iMac's (up to the slot loaders), is putting the tray that contains that you just worked on back in. I don't know how many times I have had to fight to get that back in correctly. Sometimes it goes in the first time, others, it takes several.

I have found that installing/replacing hard drives in either tray or slot loading iMac's takes about the same amount of time (within a minute or two of each other). Both have their easy and harder parts. You have to be careful with grabbing the screws on the slot load, so that they don't fall into the upper part of the case (requires major work to get them out then). The only things that are truely a snap in the slot loading iMac is memory and the airport card.

King Cobra
Mar 20, 2002, 03:34 PM
Personally, the first Apple Computer I received was the 233MHz Bondi Blue iMac. And, yes, it does have a slot-loading 24x CD-ROM. Installing the RAM on that thing is a pain in the neck. My father is not a memory-installing expert, but he could tell that there was one slot for RAM above the CPU, and another below. It is a bit tricky.

Question: How much RAM can the Rev. A iMac hold? From Ian Page and his Mac info program Mactracker the iMac could hold 512MB of RAM. However my father says that the iMac can hold less than that.
__________________

It does not take a genius to figure it out . . . just someone who uses a Mac.

PB180
Mar 20, 2002, 04:25 PM
In my Bondi iMac, I have the original 32 MB DIMM in the bottom slot along with a 256 MB DIMM for a total of 288 MB. Officially, I believe the bottom DIMM can be replaced with 128 MB, for a total of 384 MB.

However, Low End Mac (lowendmac.com) reports that a 512 MB DIMM can be put in the top slot, which I suppose would allow for a maximum of 640 MB!

Certainly one of the cool things about opening the Bondi iMac is the abundance of internal connectors which are unexpected. There is an actual mac 15 pin video cable as well as the old mac serial port for the IR. Plus the mezzanine slot, which I have never had a use for.

The video port and serial port mean that with clever hacks a larger screen can be used for these iMacs if the original 15" has problems (or is too small) or old serial devices can be used (although I can't fathom why!)

It's been a good little computer!

mischief
Mar 20, 2002, 04:29 PM
You can fit 2 lo-profile 256's in them.

Hemingray
Mar 20, 2002, 04:51 PM
Via the Help Center in the iMac Rev. B I am using right now:

Each SO-DIMM can be upgraded to 128MB SDRAM.

So offically Apple recognizes the Rev. B is capable of 256, although everymac.com says it will take up to 384 "when higher density DIMMs are produced." I'm not sure about the 512 though, mischief. It may be that only one of the DIMMs will recognize over 128. I'm no expert, though, so maybe you can! Have you successfully gotten a Rev. B to recognize 512? I've never tried.

mischief
Mar 20, 2002, 04:55 PM
2 slots @ 256 each. The 128 limit was cuz as of the date of manufacture no memory larger than a 128 would physically fit in the hole.

AlphaTech
Mar 20, 2002, 04:56 PM
Originally posted by King Cobra
Personally, the first Apple Computer I received was the 233MHz Bondi Blue iMac. And, yes, it does have a slot-loading 24x CD-ROM. Installing the RAM on that thing is a pain in the neck. My father is not a memory-installing expert, but he could tell that there was one slot for RAM above the CPU, and another below. It is a bit tricky.

Question: How much RAM can the Rev. A iMac hold? From Ian Page and his Mac info program Mactracker the iMac could hold 512MB of RAM. However my father says that the iMac can hold less than that.


The Rev A iMac didn't come with a slot loading cd-rom drive, they came with tray loading. Unless someone has made some modifications, it has to be tray.

Also, the Rev A iMac is only listed as supporting up to 128MB of memory. It is possible that it can handle more since memory has changed since then. You would be best off checking vendors to see what they have that will fit/work with that system.

King Cobra
Mar 20, 2002, 05:00 PM
Originally posted by AlphaTech


The Rev A iMac didn't come with a slot loading cd-rom drive, they came with tray loading. Unless someone has made some modifications, it has to be tray.

Also, the Rev A iMac is only listed as supporting up to 128MB of memory. It is possible that it can handle more since memory has changed since then. You would be best off checking vendors to see what they have that will fit/work with that system.

Whoops! Did I say Slot-Loading? I meant tray loading. My mistake.

My question about the memory also directs to some other source (I cannot quite pinpoint where I heard this) that said the operating system can read up to 256MB of RAM in the iMac, although more RAM could be inserted.

And 640MB is probably out of the question. I have not heard that from anyone else.
__________________

It does not take a genius to figure it out . . . just someone who uses a Mac.

MacAztec
Mar 20, 2002, 05:02 PM
Originally posted by PB180
I tried to add more RAM to my Bondi iMac (Rev A)- after reading instructions, I'm glad that I paid the extra money to watch someone else do it! That was certainly one of Apple's worst designs ever for do-it-yourself upgrades.

I too would love to add a bigger hard drive, but it's just not worth the aggravation for a 4 year old computer. I just wish I had firewire or SCSI so I could add an external!

What are you talking about? I can do this in about 5 minutes, and 9 minutes to be done! It is very easy, i didnt even know what I was doing when I opened the iMac. I guess you just have to know things ;)

AlphaTech
Mar 20, 2002, 05:24 PM
MacAztec,

All you need is a few functioning brain cells to figure out how to pull the iMac's apart to get to the memory (even less for the slot loaders). Two philips and one slot screwdriver are also all that you need. Do it once, and the next time, you will have it done in the 5-10 minute time frame, if not less. I never pulled an iMac apart before I started working where I am now. It only took one time to get to the point where I knew where everything was.

I believe that even Apple shows you how to put in the upper chip for the rev A & B iMac (they allow you to do those).

I guess the people that busted their iMac, or can't figure it out need some help (in more ways then one :D).

To think, I used to get in trouble for taking things apart, now I get paid to do it :D.

DakotaGuy
Mar 24, 2002, 05:37 PM
Originally posted by PB180
In my Bondi iMac, I have the original 32 MB DIMM in the bottom slot along with a 256 MB DIMM for a total of 288 MB. Officially, I believe the bottom DIMM can be replaced with 128 MB, for a total of 384 MB.

However, Low End Mac (lowendmac.com) reports that a 512 MB DIMM can be put in the top slot, which I suppose would allow for a maximum of 640 MB!

Certainly one of the cool things about opening the Bondi iMac is the abundance of internal connectors which are unexpected. There is an actual mac 15 pin video cable as well as the old mac serial port for the IR. Plus the mezzanine slot, which I have never had a use for.

The video port and serial port mean that with clever hacks a larger screen can be used for these iMacs if the original 15" has problems (or is too small) or old serial devices can be used (although I can't fathom why!)

It's been a good little computer!

What is a mezzanine slot? Never heard of such a thing in my life...