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jefhatfield
Jul 11, 2003, 03:45 PM
is it me, or does macrumors seem more impersonal these days?

while some of the back and forth from the old days like john123 vs spikey and kela, or alphatech vs newbies were sometimes not very friendly, people here had a community and were familiar with each other

now that macrumors is approaching 20,000 members, is there still the same sense of community?

..or does it seem weird because i am the last person standing from macrumor's first six months and from the first year there are perhaps less than half a dozen of us?

Durandal7
Jul 11, 2003, 04:56 PM
The Five Eras of the Macrumors Forums

Chapter 1
In the beginning there was blakespot and he said "let there be forums" and there were forums. Thus the Macrumors forums were created. The ability to allow comments on news articles began to draw a community that soon swelled to near 1500 and there was rejoicing. Alongside the rejoicing came flamewars, but mostly rejoicing.
Chapter 2
But alas, not all was well in the Macrumors forums, the admins grew dissatisfied with the rather primitive comment system and thus the site integrated a new backend. Gone was the primitive comment system and in it's place stood the glorious pillar that was vBulliten. And so it came to pass that in April of the year of our lord 2001 all of the existing members departed on an exodus to the new forums.
Chapter 3
Bu August 2001 the ranks of Macrumors began to swell and many familiar faces such as dukestreet began to arrive. Over the next few months Macrumors enjoyed a massive influx of new sane users. But in Feburary 2002 the serenity was shattered. A chosen son was cast out of the glorious forums by God himself, never to return. The message was clear: "One cannot go aginst the word of God." And while most accepted this a few dissented and were exiled or fled.
Chapter 4
Community Discussion was enjoying it's golden age until it was shattered. A massive influx of posters with no other purpose then political discussion arrived. The sane members fled while a few were trapped by the Siren's call of flame bait. Finally the political threads were exiled to the darkest corner of the forums, in the hopes that they would never be seen again. The demi-gods began to roam the Earth alongside mortals in this time, it was a time of magic and strife. The Gods even delegated some of their powers to a few Chosen Ones.
Chapter 5
We now live in the fifth era. New members who somehow accumulate massive amounts in a short time continually amaze while Hell's minions still attempt their occasional attack on the forums.

job
Jul 11, 2003, 05:22 PM
Originally posted by Durandal7
But in Feburary 2002 the serenity was shattered. A chosen son was cast out of the glorious forums by God himself, never to return.

I got all the references save that one.

Care to elaborate? ;)

I would tend to agree with you jef. The only people I really know are Alphatech, King Cobra, and asurace/Durandal7. Now with large amounts of users hitting the much sought after '6502' status, I no longer feel the same sense of community that I did when I started posting (June/July of 2002).

arn
Jul 11, 2003, 05:30 PM
if you stay on MacBytes.com and it's subforum, it still has a small site feel to it.

:)

besides... I don't know why Blakespot gets so much credit. He's only just been someone who helps out from time-to-time. ;)

arn

arn
Jul 11, 2003, 05:33 PM
Originally posted by jefhatfield
is it me, or does macrumors seem more impersonal these days?

now that macrumors is approaching 20,000 members, is there still the same sense of community?


In many ways you are right...

there are a ton of users... and you don't recognize most of them. I don't recognize a lot of them.

I think MacRumors has never had a very big "community" feel to it... it's always been very functional. Mac Rumors w/ discussions.

It did have it's own community of course -- but not in the warm-fuzzy feeling. Spikey et all was during the Arn is an intern and doesn't have time to deal with the forums era. Which meant discussions could get crazy... and I would look into it every few weeks or something.

In it's chaos, somehow you all emerged. :)

arn

jbomber
Jul 11, 2003, 05:40 PM
Originally posted by job
I got all the references save that one.

Care to elaborate? ;)

I would tend to agree with you jef. The only people I really know are Alphatech, King Cobra, and asurace/Durandal7. Now with large amounts of users hitting the much sought after '6502' status, I no longer feel the same sense of community that I did when I started posting (June/July of 2002).

Er, what's '6502' status?

Sorry to ask, but i guess i've only been here for a couple weeks.

job
Jul 11, 2003, 05:49 PM
Originally posted by jbomber
Er, what's '6502' status?

Sorry to ask, but i guess i've only been here for a couple weeks.

It's when a user hits 500 posts.

They are a macrumors 6502 and are allowed to have an avatar.

:)

Durandal7
Jul 11, 2003, 06:03 PM
Originally posted by job
I got all the references save that one.

Care to elaborate? ;)


spikey, his "chosen son" status is up for debate but since it was a joke I figured it didn't really matter :D

jbomber
Jul 11, 2003, 06:20 PM
more drama than 'Days of our Lives'...

do tell...

Wardofsky
Jul 12, 2003, 03:35 AM
I think the Demi-G's/Contribs have a seperate community, they are the ones that "Payed to Play" (As duke put's it).

I also think the one's with avatars that have lasted the test of time make them obvious.

Those who have access to the Mac info are special ;)

I think that the DGVPG was a very different ;)

tazo
Jul 12, 2003, 04:27 AM
I know I am not an old schooler by any means, having registered only a few months ago. In that time I have seen the member count grow by well over 3,000. The issue of whether or not continuing expansion of a website is good or not is debatable. I believe that for a person to feel this site is a community, or even that they are part of it, a certain amount of dedication is required. It is like when you first join a bulletin board community. You are out of place, you don't really know how the system works or even how the people react. But I stuck with the website, eventually registering a few months ago.

Had I not kept reading posts, had I not tried to figure out the rule, had I not attempted to understand what was camaraderie and what wasn't, I may never have felt welcome on this website.

But enough about me.

I agree with you jef'. As a website such as this expands, the personal touch of the formed community lessens exponentially. However like a city that expands with more people every year, the services are increased and bettered, and a distinct 'culture' is attained.

With the ever-growing amount of people joining this site every day, the Macrumors.com community will grow. However if the members of this website, the very individuals who make this website even worthwhile do not unite for the prosperity of the site, then any future for the site will have been tarnished.

Call me crazy, but a community that gets along, lives long.

-tazo

Wardofsky
Jul 12, 2003, 04:54 AM
You still have to remember how many people registered are inactive with only a few posts.

If there was one big purge I'm sure we'll see some more accurate active numbers.

I'm not saying we should, but there are a lot of inactive members.

WinterMute
Jul 12, 2003, 12:53 PM
I had a browse through the member lists the other day, I was really surprised at the numbers of members who have never posted at all, and the vast majority of the posters are well below even 100 posts, I have to say that I find the sense of community here much more coherent and friendly than any other forum site.

I'm sure it's down to the strictness of arn's administration and the good work of the mods, I think a lot of new members would do well to remember this isn't a democracy, it is a benign dictatorship.

Does V-bulletin allow any stats on log-ins? Theoretically an unused account could be deactivated after a period of time I suppose.

I've been here six months or so, so I can't claim to be a vet, but I feel like I belong now.

King Cobra
Jul 12, 2003, 03:43 PM
If anyone has the song Bullets by Creed read the first 5 chapters again while playing the song. :eek:

Originally posted by arn (in one post)
:)
;)


The change occured when forum members noticed the smallest occurances. Arn, have you ever used two smilies in one post before? :)

I still like the strictly-dedicated Mac "discussion" that was AlphaTech, spikey, jef, joey j and john123 (two of my favorite forum members).

The new political MacRumors does not seem so entertaining as before. Yes, there are facts and news as always, but I think the "fun" factor has lacked off slowly.

Perhaps it was all because of the political discussion that originated, but even when the "geek thread" and funny pictures threads were key threads in the Community section of MacRumors, you couldn't feel the original MacRumors entertainment feeling you would have felt a year ago.

Also, anologies and casual phrases are not fun. They are indirect and suggestive to false themes. I feel direct impact truth and specific opinions draw in crowds rather than make them think abut what is being said.

The MacRumors community has gradualy changed from explicit to indirect in only a matter of a few years, and the confusion of the word "fact" with the word "opinion" has coincided with this change. False assumptions are made by some individuals at MacRumors. A member could simply correct the mistake another member made. But sometimes this does not occur.

When a member corrects another individual's mistakes in the form of a "rant" or an insult, so-called "flamewars" are generated. Such flamewars make up the new MacRumors, with new being anytime a political forum was ever in existance at MacRumors. Add facts and evidence, or even rational experiences to these flamewars, and you have the old MacRumors, which involved more insightful information integrated into flamewars.

Yes, I miss the old days for that reason. I miss the AlphaTech vs. AmbitiousLemon arguments, which may have been the most intelligent arguments ever held by two MacRumors contributors. I miss the joey j vs. spikey conflicts, which were the longest, one-sided series of conflicts ever at MacRumors.

Perhaps if we never see these days again, we will see more intelligent days in front of us. But we make our future our past after we have lived it.

job
Jul 12, 2003, 08:12 PM
Originally posted by King Cobra
The new political MacRumors does not seem so entertaining as before. Yes, there are facts and news as always, but I think the "fun" factor has lacked off slowly.

I hear that. I remember during the months of June/July 2002. Those were fun months, when the Alien thread was still going strong and the Macrumors community really seemed alive. It seemed that everywhere you looked users had certain inside jokes with others which still seemed funny to all the rest. I have yet to laugh that hard since.

[Y]ou couldn't feel the original MacRumors entertainment feeling you would have felt a year ago.

You're right. Something was and still is missing. I don't claim to know what it is, but it just isn't 'fun' anymore. Even with the release of the long awaited G5s, the forums still seem muted, the only exception being the hotly contested PoliWar forum.

King Cobra
Jul 13, 2003, 03:39 PM
>You're right. Something was and still is missing. I don't claim to know what it is, but it just isn't 'fun' anymore.

I think the fun and entertainment factor is still there, but its integration into MacRumors discussion has changed. The feeling of entertaining and intelligent flamewars has decreased significantly to the point in which individuals feel powerful with underaged and offensive vocabulary within flamewars.

But, perhaps, this is just my view.

Here are a few threads serving as examples to my viewpoint. These are the older threads of MacRumors.

URL the 1st (http://forums.macrumors.com/showthread.php?s=&threadid=593) (November 2001)
URL the 2nd (http://forums.macrumors.com/showthread.php?s=&threadid=5524) (May 2002)

Some individuals would incorporate the viewpoint of the Xg5 and spikey wars from February 2002. To those, who can more relate to threads, such as this (http://forums.macrumors.com/showthread.php?s=&threadid=2505) and this (http://forums.macrumors.com/showthread.php?s=&threadid=2502), the only reason for why such threads may appeal to you is the content of the discussion is far below acceptable levels of intelligent discussion. As a matter of my opinion, these levels are so low that they attract individuals, who find this immature extreme appealing, even though this describes nothing else about the reader.

Many newer flamewars, especially with regard to such in the political section, involve a conglomeration of objectional references and insults, rather than either extreme of intelligent discussion. Even individuals, who do not take offense to such comments, will recognize that other individuals are offended. It is at the moment that such a derogatory comment is either made or address with an even further derogatory remark in which the "fun" factor evolves in a negative fashion.

I feel that it would be difficult to retrieve that fun factor, since we will forever remember the remarks that changed that factor. I also feel that such a fun factor is brought back to our conscious every time we create threads for the purpose of temporarily setting aside this conscious, because the memories of the offending remarks certain individuals have made are more potent in our minds than a joke, or a picture.

This is the case for not just MacRumors, but everywhere in life.

The difference is the "fun" factor is overlayed by the consciousness the most when the relationship between the current environment and the environment in which harsh and degrading comments are most relative to each other.

For instance, below is a thread at a website called syntrillium.com, in which the topic is dedicated to the $64000 question: How do you remove vocals from music? As you read through the thread, as well as the conglomerative comical input by registered users, you will be able to enjoy that fun factor once again without having to worry abut the background of the site.

Syntrillium (http://forums.syntrillium.com/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=9436&whichpage=1)

The more we encounter offenses to ourselves that impact our conscious, the more attempts we make to find a new opposite extreme to hide our conscious. When we can relate the most to our painful memories, we are not as joyfully entertained as we would be in an environment away from these memories and our own conscious. But both our past and our conscious have this in common: They stay in our lives forever, and we cannnot change them.

Gus
Jul 14, 2003, 04:17 AM
Cobra, I generally agree with your statements, but I present this
http://forums.macrumors.com/showthread.php?threadid=22989&highlight=Behold

As a recent example of a very long thread with very few of the insults. It was actually VERY civial for more than 95% of the thread. That said, in the last couple of years, things do seem to have changed, but I don't think it is for the bad. It's just not as, how was it put, "warm and fuzzy" as it once was.

Regards,
Gus

King Cobra
Jul 14, 2003, 09:32 AM
Gus, I can tell you did not have to search that thread for long, as it stuck out in your mind. Perhaps it is an excellent choice, but many new long threads have no/few flamewars, with the exception of politics.

As for your thread, there are too many offensive references for me to read through, so I closed the window with the thread on the first page.

I do agree...

>That said, in the last couple of years, things do seem to have changed, but I don't think it is for the bad. It's just not as, how was it put, "warm and fuzzy" as it once was.

with that, because the change is not for the bad. It's for the members of MacRumors, who have changed. New faces have arrived on the scene with certain personality traits, and others have left MacRumors, taking with them their unique traits.

MrMacMan
Jul 15, 2003, 12:33 AM
Whoever says the current situation with MacRumors has turned into a flamewar is totally incorrect, if they have every registered anyplace else they would know that the current situation is 10000x better then it could be.

We have a Hella lot of member that just never even posted, that is bad IMO, but it shows that as we get larger, we have even more empty space.

Heck I am decreasing ranking because of you people! ;)

Anyway when people don't know what '6502' Status is, that scares me.

john123
Jul 20, 2003, 10:13 AM
I'll put in my two cents' worth....

The "revolving door" of new members made it a lot harder for people like me to want to post on as consistent a basis. I still use the site very frequently, to read the news articles, and on rare occasions I will read comments...but when you can get a couple hundred posts on a thread in such a short period of time, it feels like your own individual post doesn't matter as much and is less likely to be read.

The problem for me is that with so many members, there ought to be a little basic courtesy with regard to posting etiquette; specifically, I'd say that if you aren't adding anything to the thread that is well-thought-out, then you should keep it to yourself. The sheer volume of posts that are a couple lines long and contribute nothing to the discussion makes it so much harder to wade through the threads to find the "good" ones.

-j123

Squire
Aug 16, 2003, 09:27 AM
Originally posted by MrMacman
Anyway when people don't know what '6502' Status is, that scares me.

I've been wondering what "6502" meant for ages. I asked a question in the site restructuring thread but got no answer. Searched the FAQ and every (I think) related thread. Still nothing. Not until now, when I stumbled on this thread, was my question finally answered. I actually would like to know the hierarchy, for lack of a better term, of the member designations. And, by the way, what's the significance of the number 6502? Perhaps you could direct me to the thread where this is explained.

Originally posted by john123
I'll put in my two cents' worth....

...The problem for me is that with so many members, there ought to be a little basic courtesy with regard to posting etiquette; specifically, I'd say that if you aren't adding anything to the thread that is well-thought-out, then you should keep it to yourself. The sheer volume of posts that are a couple lines long and contribute nothing to the discussion makes it so much harder to wade through the threads to find the "good" ones.

-j123

I've been noticing the same thing lately. There are a lot of people who must have a ton of spare time on their hands. I find it amazing how a person can amass 500 posts in a month or so.

Squire

MacAztec
Aug 27, 2003, 09:39 PM
I miss the old days of when I first joined the site. I remember you jef, and eye, and Kishba I believe.

There were like 15 main posters. It was awesome.

jsw
Feb 15, 2005, 03:39 PM
*** On the lab table, one sees an aged and forgotten thread, dusty and desiccated. ***

*** An evil genius (or mad idiot) stands, hand on switch. ***

*** The switch is pulled down. ***

*** Bolts of lightning arc through the room. ***

*** "It's ALIVE!" ***

I think MacRumors has never had a very big "community" feel to it... it's always been very functional. Mac Rumors w/ discussions. ...

I came across this while verifying Mr. Anderson's previous identity. Yes, it makes me feel like a new pup given the vast age of others' memberships (although I'm now in something like the 33rd percentile in terms of seniority).

However, I'm posting because I think that, at least to me, the forums do provide a fair sense of community. Perhaps it was missing for a while, back in those years before I stumbled into the light, but I think we feel like a community now. Any of the elders care to comment?

evildead
Feb 17, 2005, 06:09 PM
I used to post here a lot more durring the "old days". I think your right about the impersonal feel. I guess thats what happens when something becomes more and more popular. Now days, I just poke my head in now and then.

-evildead

stcanard
Feb 17, 2005, 06:50 PM
As somebody who's been around for about a year and a half, I certainly can't comment on what it used to be like, but I get a definite "community" feeling out of MacRumors.

In the technical forums, the community is very helpful. In the news/rumors forums, people often get off in heated debate, and of course the community forums anything can be talked about. Although there are a lot of members, there a number that stand out in my mind, being either the most prolific posters (edesign comes to mind...) or ones I've had personal battles/arguments with. It definitely leaves me with a feeling of "knowing" people here.

I've noticed that I remember avatars better than names, that's why I finally got around to adding one myself. So definitely the 6502+ range sticks out in my mind better than the "regular" or "member" people.

I won't touch the Political forum. In my opinion American politics is too polarized these days, and that gets reflected in the fact that in any forum (TV/radio/bulletin boards) it seems to be impossible to have a passionate debate/discourse witout people resorting to personal animosity. The opinions are too far apart and too entrenched in jingoism (on both sides). As an outside observer, I say this is reflective of a change in American society on the whole in the last decade, not anything specific to this forum.

I wonder, for the people that feel like there is a loss of community, how much time do you spend in the political forum? I could see the level of vitriol that I sometimes observe there colouring the overall view of MR.

blackfox
Feb 17, 2005, 07:15 PM
This is an interesting thread, I am glad it got resurrected (thanks JSW), it is interesting to see people lamenting the "old days" a year-and-a-half ago.

It is my second anniversary as a member here tomorrow (feb 18th), though I used to lurk for the better part of 2002. I still see some old faces from that time, although they seem to be overpowered by all the new blood. I wonder how old-school I am at the two-year mark (comparatively).

I remember spikey vaguely, which was refreshed by KC's linking to a classic thread involving a protracted flame-war between joey j and spikey, which while asinine, was also pretty entertaining and rather informative. I am so glad that no-one deconstructs posts like joey j (or john123 iirc), it was ridiculous to follow. It was also amusing to look at expectations of G5s waay before they came, or even reasonable assumptions about the speed-increases of G4s, which never happened.

As for the political forum, for the past 1.5 years, I have posted mainly there, as thankfully I have not needed much tech help and some of the help/rumor threads become unduly repetitive for my tastes. This is why it took me almost two years to acheive 6502 status. It is my experience that the political forum ebbs and flows, depending on contributers and news items. 2004, being an election year, was a rather spirited time, with a wealth of contributers from all walks-of-life and viewpoints. Since it's crash and burn after the Election, it has been decidedly in ebb mode, but I am sure it will recover in time. I feel this is true for the forums at large, also, as some really great threads still pop up and get the community involved.

Through all this time, however, I have been impressed that MR has managed to keep such a high-level of discourse and civility, which is a testament to both the moderators and to the members. Considering the site's rapid growth, this is no small task. I look forward to continual enjoyment in the months and years ahead.

5300cs
Feb 18, 2005, 12:12 AM
I registered in 2002, does that make me old skool? :confused: :)

I mainly post in the Collectors thread because that is my passion (and because there's no Fanaticism thread.) I remember City of Glass getting kicked off (or leaving?) after fighting with a number of people.

These days it seems like there are lot of new people, and still some older folks, and they tend to mix. I am also surprised at the number of new people coming, and the amount of time it takes to get 500 posts; it took my almost 2 years :eek:

The people here are for the most part friendly though, (a hell of a lot better than Apple Fritter- I don't even waste my time there anymore.) Since I've been here so long, and have so many posts, I'm kind of too lazy to register anywhere else.

The only other forums I post to are Japantoday.com and the Mac 68k Liberation Army.

saabmp3
Feb 18, 2005, 12:52 AM
I registered in 2002, does that make me old skool? :confused: :)
These days it seems like there are lot of new people, and still some older folks, and they tend to mix. I am also surprised at the number of new people coming, and the amount of time it takes to get 500 posts; it took my almost 2 years :eek:


It seems like we get a new user, they go on a posting rampage for about 6 months and get to the 2000 post count. Then they disappear, never to be seen again. Sometimes it really frustrates me, they're doing it for the post count. I'm at around 600 and it took years to get to this point. I post when I have something that I want to say, hopefully useful. If I never hit 2000, it won't make a difference to me, or probably to anybody else on the forum.

If I put in 10 good, resourceful comments total, that will have a much better impact.

BEN

Squire
Feb 18, 2005, 02:00 AM
It seems like we get a new user, they go on a posting rampage for about 6 months and get to the 2000 post count. Then they disappear, never to be seen again. Sometimes it really frustrates me, they're doing it for the post count. I'm at around 600 and it took years to get to this point. I post when I have something that I want to say, hopefully useful. If I never hit 2000, it won't make a difference to me, or probably to anybody else on the forum.

If I put in 10 good, resourceful comments total, that will have a much better impact.

BEN

I wish there were more people like you. (When I found out about the 500-post mark for a 'tar, I was shocked and just succumbed to the idea of never having one. Just for kicks, I checked my post count the other day and found I had just crossed the 1000-post mark.) There sure are a lot of posts that are:

LOL
Cool!!!
G5 PowerBooks next Tuesday?
;)
etc.

You get the idea.

Squire

vniow
Feb 18, 2005, 04:36 PM
*** "It's ALIVE!" ***

You've gone mad!!

*ahem*

The community has changed quite a bit since I've been here (approaching 3 years come July), mostly in size and participation. Its quite a bit larger than what it was even a year ago which is part of the reason why I don't post nearly as much as I used to, chances are whatever I want to contribute to a thread has already been said by the time I get to it. Another is because I've been Mac-less for awhile and feel a bit out of place among much of the forum, I do try to help out when I can though.
Aside from my issues, the forums here still feel like a community nonetheless, its the one I visit and participate the most in even though I visit other boards on a regular basis.
The one thing I don't like about the forums getting as large as they have is there tends to be a lot of repitition which I think can drive some older members away, like as mentioned before, a lot of things get stated or asked over and over again and it gets quite frustrating. Regardless, its still worth it to visit here as much as I do and see what's going on, even if I don't seem to participate as much as I have had in the past.

-Ani

5300cs
Feb 18, 2005, 04:50 PM
I've noticed the same thing. The one thing I don't like about the forums getting as large as they have is there tends to be a lot of repitition which I think can drive ... oh :D

I see the same series of questions over and over again:

When will Apple make another PDA?
Can I rip DVDs on Mac?
What are some good Mac programs?
Should I buy a PB or an iBook?
How much RAM do I need?
A Mac for gaming?

It takes a few months, but guaranteed these questions will crop up. :rolleyes: If we put up stickies on all those questions, would the newbies read them, or just post the same Qs anyway?

Lacero
Feb 18, 2005, 04:50 PM
The Five Eras of the Macrumors Forums

Chapter 1
In the beginning there was blakespot and he said "let there be forums" and there were forums. Thus the Macrumors forums were created. The ability to allow comments on news articles began to draw a community that soon swelled to near 1500 and there was rejoicing. Alongside the rejoicing came flamewars, but mostly rejoicing.
Chapter 2
But alas, not all was well in the Macrumors forums, the admins grew dissatisfied with the rather primitive comment system and thus the site integrated a new backend. Gone was the primitive comment system and in it's place stood the glorious pillar that was vBulliten. And so it came to pass that in April of the year of our lord 2001 all of the existing members departed on an exodus to the new forums.
Chapter 3
Bu August 2001 the ranks of Macrumors began to swell and many familiar faces such as dukestreet began to arrive. Over the next few months Macrumors enjoyed a massive influx of new sane users. But in Feburary 2002 the serenity was shattered. A chosen son was cast out of the glorious forums by God himself, never to return. The message was clear: "One cannot go aginst the word of God." And while most accepted this a few dissented and were exiled or fled.
Chapter 4
Community Discussion was enjoying it's golden age until it was shattered. A massive influx of posters with no other purpose then political discussion arrived. The sane members fled while a few were trapped by the Siren's call of flame bait. Finally the political threads were exiled to the darkest corner of the forums, in the hopes that they would never be seen again. The demi-gods began to roam the Earth alongside mortals in this time, it was a time of magic and strife. The Gods even delegated some of their powers to a few Chosen Ones.
Chapter 5
We now live in the fifth era. New members who somehow accumulate massive amounts in a short time continually amaze while Hell's minions still attempt their occasional attack on the forums.

What Chapter would we be in now?

5300cs
Feb 18, 2005, 04:58 PM
The Five Eras of the Macrumors Forums

...

Chapter 5
We now live in the fifth era. New members who somehow accumulate massive amounts in a short time continually amaze while Hell's minions still attempt their occasional attack on the forums. :)

Blue Velvet
Feb 19, 2005, 03:26 AM
What Chapter would we be in now?

Hopefully not 11...

This thread has a mournful and wistful quality about it.

Things move on. If anything has recently changed in the last 3-4 months it's an influx of recent and intending switchers with numbers in their names... many of them adolescent.

It's understandable but pointless to be disparaging about these new members at least membership is rising... many of them will stay, some of them may even end up contributing.

It can be instructive to look back at your own first efforts on this forum...

themadchemist
Feb 22, 2005, 04:29 PM
It's still strange to me to see threads with only 30 or 40 posts average a thousand or two thousand views...While the average number of posts per thread has probably increased, that change seems more subtle to me than the dramatic rise in hit counts.

tpjunkie
Mar 2, 2005, 10:14 AM
I think it is true that this place has changed, and I actually remember reading this thread when it was first posted; however I had only been a member for 8 months or so, so I really had no idea what people were talking about. I registered right after the TiBooks were revised to D, (bemoaning how my computer had become obsolete in three months). In those halcyon days, it seemed there were fewer regulars, but they always had something to say. When a new product was announced, it was possible to post a comment in the forum thread without it immediately disappearing in a sea of similar comments that would hit 400 posts in hours.

This forum is still evolving, and the moderation remains excellent; I don't think there is any escaping the effect of the number of members has on community though.

weev
Mar 5, 2005, 05:09 PM
It's when a user hits 500 posts.

They are a macrumors 6502 and are allowed to have an avatar.

:)


Ok, so this is why the forums are generally of poor quality, people just write "I want one, too", so they may accrue their post numbers for a symbolic rise in status.

Surely, it's about quality rather than quantity?

job
Mar 6, 2005, 12:29 PM
Ok, so this is why the forums are generally of poor quality, people just write "I want one, too", so they may accrue their post numbers for a symbolic rise in status.

Surely, it's about quality rather than quantity?

Quality yes, sadly some posters aren't willing to put in the thought or effort to post something worthwhile, especially if their only goal is to get the avatar next to their name.

I'm not saying that all posters do this and I definitely had a lot of worthless posts when I first joined these boards, but with a lot of the older members that I used to post with leaving/already left, it just doesn't feel the same anymore.

Applespider
Mar 6, 2005, 12:55 PM
I'm on a couple of forums that have no post count statuses. We still tend to get lots of one-line 'me too' posts tho. It's a sports forum though.

The trouble is that for many new questioners on a 'tech' board, it's useful to know whether the answer to fix your sick Mac is coming from a fellow newbie who may not know the answer or somene who's been there and tried it several times (although 6502 status may have been built up through 'me too' posts and the newbie may be a closet Mac service repairer!)

The trouble is that a 'postcount' based system is the easiest to organise/manage. Unfortunately, it's also the easiest to abuse. I'm not sure whether perhaps there's a way to mix posts with time on the site. So you can't be a 6502 until you've been a member for 6 or 12 months (which might discourage some from posting more than the 1 to 3 times a day that would take).

I guess the other problem is the community spirit. As seen in the recent 'You know you spend too much time on Macrumors when' thread, this community is addictive. People click on the 'new posts' search and want to be included, want to be helpful and feel they need to say something, even if it's not particularly useful to the person.

If people also read through rather than just hitting reply, we'd have less too. Yes, threads get long but if you don't read all the way through and jsut add a question that's already been answered, you make them even longer - and you're still going to go through screeds to find the answer if you come back several hours later to check.

Perhaps if everyone paused before hitting the 'submit reply' button to figure out if what they'd typed did actually help or further the discussion rather than being a 'me too', we'd have a few less posts... (pause..... click)

MrMacMan
Mar 7, 2005, 02:58 PM
MacRumors has changed too much.

No I'm not just blabbering on and on, there was a community, of friends, of people you know and can talk to.

Now -- Its just like on random threads people are really really nasty.

I mean even just repost, people can yell repost, but its more like 'Why the hell did you repost this... God I've seen this 10000000x times... Geez this AGAIN!'
I mean it was alright before if you just didn't talk to people outside the forums, but now its not even like people want to talk to anyway.

Members don't care much about the forums or apple or anything specific there are -- they are all just here.

I mean it just happened right before the forum change skins, everyone started to get nasty.

I dunno if anyone can be done but heck I remember were members would get their birthday posted in community disc. but not anymore.

Just like today for my birthday.
--MrMacMan

Blue Velvet
Mar 7, 2005, 03:05 PM
MacRumors has changed too much.

No I'm not just blabbering on and on, there was a community, of friends, of people you know and can talk to.

Now -- Its just like on random threads people are really really nasty.

I mean even just repost, people can yell repost, but its more like 'Why the hell did you repost this... God I've seen this 10000000x times... Geez this AGAIN!'
I mean it was alright before if you just didn't talk to people outside the forums, but now its not even like people want to talk to anyway.

Members don't care much about the forums or apple or anything specific there are -- they are all just here.

I mean it just happened right before the forum change skins, everyone started to get nasty.

I dunno if anyone can be done but heck I remember were members would get their birthday posted in community disc. but not anymore.

Just like today for my birthday.
--MrMacMan


Happy Birthday MrMacMan :)

I try to occasionally say Happy Birthday to people I can remember...

Basically, it sounds like the village is now a town or a city where individuals are more anonymous and less respectful of each other's views.

But don't give up on it yet. There are plenty of interesting, fun, thoughtful people here -- you get out of it what you put in.

Squire
Mar 7, 2005, 03:21 PM
Yeah, happy birthday. Treat yourself to a few strings at the local bowling alley. ;)

Squire

MrMacMan
Mar 7, 2005, 04:11 PM
Thanks guys.

:D

I suppose not everyone is mean spirited ;)

evildead
Mar 7, 2005, 06:38 PM
Remember when eyelikeart organized a "geek fest"? I don't remember where it was but I think there was only one. I didn't attend but, that was a diffrent time for this community.

MacAztec
Mar 7, 2005, 06:48 PM
I miss the old MacRumors. When there were intellectual posts in threads. I remember JefHatField (who is that now BTW, I forget), Eyelikeart, AlphaTech (he was cool, where is he now?), Duke, etc. You knew what kind of things people would say, and who to ask for things.

Now, you go to a thread and you just read people that say "Oh, that is cool!" or "I can't wait for this". Just crap, I can't stand it. I think that is why my post count is declining so much. When whoever it was made that thread about the top posters etc., I think my count was dropping the fastest. Oh well, still a good site.

Personally, I don't like the new skin.

Squire
Mar 7, 2005, 08:38 PM
Wasn't that "geek fest" in London? I remember reading that and wondering what kind of event it would be. Imagine, sitting around with a dozen people you know only from posts and screen names.

MacAztec, I know what you mean. When something is announced (i.e. new iPods), I don't even bother posting because by the time I finish typing mine, I'm 5 friggin' pages behind. I still remember seeing the first thread on the PowerMac G5. It was, like, 23 pages or something. amazing. Now, anything new gets an astronomical number of posts. Arn's going to have to invest in some Xserves.

Squire

job
Mar 8, 2005, 11:36 AM
There were several domestic (aka American) geekfests a few years back.

Don't know if the one in London ever got off the ground.

If I recall correctly there was one in DC and the idea of having one in Boston or the MA area was floated.

MacAztec: Alphatech has been gone for a very, very long time. He left when we still posted regularly here, which itself hasn't been for a very long time. He started his own site, the Techpub, which last time I checked has been doing alright for itself.

yellow
Mar 8, 2005, 12:21 PM
The one thing I don't like about the forums getting as large as they have is there tends to be a lot of repitition which I think can drive some older members away, like as mentioned before, a lot of things get stated or asked over and over again and it gets quite frustrating.

I think part of this is to blame on the abysmal search functions of vBulletin. For example, if you had troubles with your "Help Menu", just try and search for that. The search function treats every word as a separate entity, so you end up with everytime someone used the work "help" in a post. Yikes. That is, assuming it doesn't splat you with a "there are too many posts containing the work help".

Of coruse, the other problem is that people are lazy. Why look for yourself ([b]GIYF[/g] [Google Is Your Friend]) when you can just post at 10 different Forums and have it spoon fed to you?

Chaszmyr
Mar 8, 2005, 12:51 PM
With most forum-centered sites I've used in the past, it started out great, with a real tight-knit group, and it gradually grew out of control and lost the old charm. With this site, however, I've had something of an opposite response. I'm not quite as enthusiastic about Apple as i used to be (I'm still more enthusiastic about it than anything else... Just not as enthusiastic about life in general anymore), but lately I've been feeling a sense of community and bonding with some of the regulars here that I've never felt before on this site.

GeeYouEye
Apr 3, 2005, 09:05 PM
Yep, I definitely miss the old days. So many fond memories... nothing like that today... I think the most recent "old time" thread is the "What's your definition of Geek??" thread...

jefhatfield
Apr 4, 2005, 12:26 AM
I miss the old MacRumors. When there were intellectual posts in threads. I remember JefHatField (who is that now BTW, I forget),

he he...i am still jefhatfield...i was networkman for a short time in the early days of macrumors back when i was still enthusiastic about being a techie (which i have burned out on over the years)

when i see these boards today, i get used to the new, heavy posters and i think they see macrumors in a new, fresh way us oldtimers did back in the day and they have a sense of community here...otherwise, they wouldn't keep coming back day after day

i have definitely lurked more than actually posted but that's ok since it's fun to see the new order of macrumors and the personalities and points of view on just about everything under the sun