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MacRumors
Jul 1, 2007, 08:05 AM
http://www.macrumors.com/images/macrumorsthreadlogo.gif (http://www.macrumors.com)

Amidst the pre-iPhone launch hype, Visto announced (http://www.visto.com/news/releases/07.06.28_iphone.asp) that they would be providing Exchange support for the iPhone.

Through Visto, iPhone users will be able to experience secure mobile access to current and legacy versions of both Microsoft Exchange and IBM Lotus Domino corporate messaging platforms. Visto will enable access that is easy to implement and administer and will alleviate IT concerns regarding security and reliability.

At present, the iPhone can only support Exchange servers if IMAP support is enabled on the servers.

Visto Mobile for the iPhone will be available in "late Q3 2007". A free 60-day trial will be offered (www.vistomobile.com/iphone) when its released. There is no other word on pricing.

This does, however, represent at least one 3rd party application making its way to the iPhone.



IEatApples
Jul 1, 2007, 08:21 AM
Great… now bring on some more! :)

BuzzLightyear
Jul 1, 2007, 08:57 AM
Are you sure this is really a third-party app for the iPhone and NOT some product that will run on a PC/Mac and as a conduit between the Exchange server and the iPhone's regular Mail.app?

Their other product is "Visto Mobile", available in several versions including a "Personal Edition":

Visto Mobile Personal Edition is easy-to-use and designed for individuals and small groups, offices and departments with less than five people. With a single installation of our PC software, you can have the mobile email you want without having to purchase a server-based solution. Visto Mobile features a small piece of software you download onto your PC at work and the Visto Mobile application that you download onto your mobile phone." (emphasis mine)

Given that Mail.app is a much more capable mail program than what is found on most mobile phones (there probably aren't many that have IMAP support out-of-the-box), I'm thinking it's possible that there is no need for any third-party program, just their software that runs on your work computer.

Just a thought...

dernhelm
Jul 1, 2007, 09:02 AM
Are you sure this is really a third-party app for the iPhone and NOT some product that will run on a PC/Mac and as a conduit between the Exchange server and the iPhone's regular Mail.app?

Their other product is "Visto Mobile", available in several versions including a "Personal Edition":

Visto Mobile Personal Edition is easy-to-use and designed for individuals and small groups, offices and departments with less than five people. With a single installation of our PC software, you can have the mobile email you want without having to purchase a server-based solution. Visto Mobile features a small piece of software you download onto your PC at work and the Visto Mobile application that you download onto your mobile phone." (emphasis mine)

Given that Mail.app is a much more capable mail program than what is found on most mobile phones, it's entirely possible their is no need for any third-party program, just the software that runs on your work computer.

Just a thought.

Anything is possible, there are very few details, but if this is what they meant, then their press release is VERY misleading. Only receiving exchange mail when syncing with your Mac would be a non-solution solution, and certainly isn't what the press release seems to imply.

Now it is unlikely that they'll have "push mail" a la Yahoo mail (or crackberry), but you should be able to minimally retrieve on the road (without accessing your Mac).

Zadillo
Jul 1, 2007, 09:26 AM
Are you sure this is really a third-party app for the iPhone and NOT some product that will run on a PC/Mac and as a conduit between the Exchange server and the iPhone's regular Mail.app?

Their other product is "Visto Mobile", available in several versions including a "Personal Edition":

Visto Mobile Personal Edition is easy-to-use and designed for individuals and small groups, offices and departments with less than five people. With a single installation of our PC software, you can have the mobile email you want without having to purchase a server-based solution. Visto Mobile features a small piece of software you download onto your PC at work and the Visto Mobile application that you download onto your mobile phone." (emphasis mine)

Given that Mail.app is a much more capable mail program than what is found on most mobile phones (there probably aren't many that have IMAP support out-of-the-box), I'm thinking it's possible that there is no need for any third-party program, just their software that runs on your work computer.

Just a thought...

I would definitely say that the fact that there current software requires a download onto your phone, that they actually do have a third party app. It isn't just about integrating with a mail client.

Look at:

http://www.visto.com/products/devices_vmpe.asp

Visto supports all of the leading platforms including:

* Symbian OS (UIQ, Series 60, Series 80)
* Windows Mobile Edition (PocketPC and Smartphone)
* Palm OS
* J2ME
* WAP 1.3, WAP 2.0, HTML, Imode

So even with smartphones, they're talking about their app running on Symbian, Windows Mobile, Palm OS, J2ME.

This really sounds like a third party app, and not something that works with regular mail clients (if it wasn't, there'd be no need to create apps for Symbian, Windows Mobile, Palm OS, etc. since you could just use the mail clients for each of those OS's).

The iPhone's Mail app is pretty capable, but so is the mail app on some of these other platforms; a lot of the supported devices are either smartphones/PDA phones or at least regular phones with Java clients. It seems clear that their solution is built around a third party client install on the phone itself.

This strikes me as a very good sign as far as future announcements of "real" third party apps.

-Zadillo

MOFS
Jul 1, 2007, 09:30 AM
I can see this being the first of a lon line of 3rd party apps trickling onto the iPhone. I guess Apple will just do "checks" on the software just to make sure it doesn't crash the phone - something they're rightly wary of.

IEatApples
Jul 1, 2007, 09:31 AM
…wonder when games are gonna come? :cool:

Any news from Nintendo? ;)

newamiga
Jul 1, 2007, 10:02 AM
I am sure this makes sense to some, but why have Exchange and Domino support if you don't sell to businesses or let business customers activate iPhones? They have a bunch of pissed of corporate customers..

Zadillo
Jul 1, 2007, 10:08 AM
I am sure this makes sense to some, but why have Exchange and Domino support if you don't sell to businesses or let business customers activate iPhones? They have a bunch of pissed of corporate customers..

I'm sure that these things are being worked on.

-Zadillo

Xenious
Jul 1, 2007, 10:11 AM
The 3rd party application piece might be nice, but as far as the idea itself this is poor. I've seen different "exchange sync" type clients and most require something running on your desktop that your phone then communicates back to and the desktop piece talks to exchange/etc. Besides being an annoying solution the danger here is that Apple decides this is "good enough" and doesn't go further with adding native over the air activesync support.

Trust me that the difference between your phone talking directly to an exchange server and using a desktop as an intermediate step (even over the internet) is night and day.

mi5moav
Jul 1, 2007, 10:12 AM
So, this and the BMW announcement where the two missing announcements?? I hope there is more.

What happens if you drag an ipod game to the iphone?

Much Ado
Jul 1, 2007, 10:16 AM
…wonder when games are gonna come? :cool:

Any news from Nintendo? ;)

I'm sure iPhone is powerful enough to run the majority of Wii games out there ;)

Zadillo
Jul 1, 2007, 10:17 AM
So, this and the BMW announcement where the two missing announcements?? I hope there is more.

What happens if you drag an ipod game to the iphone?

iPod games wouldn't work on the iPhone.

Besides, iPod games are mostly designed around the presence and use of the scrollwheel.

I would not be surprised to see games made available for the iPhone, but I think they would be games specifically made for it.

Random Ping
Jul 1, 2007, 10:22 AM
Given that the iPhone supports VPN, I wonder if sys-admins will just set up IMAP through a VPN to access Exchange?

JeffDM
Jul 1, 2007, 10:34 AM
iPod games wouldn't work on the iPhone.

Besides, iPod games are mostly designed around the presence and use of the scrollwheel.

I would not be surprised to see games made available for the iPhone, but I think they would be games specifically made for it.

I think the scroll wheel can be emulated, but you would be stuck in portrait mode, using about a third of the screen for the display and the rest for a simulated scroll wheel and simulated buttons to the sides. I think it would be a nice idea, just not as nice as a game made for the new type of touch screen. I just don't think it bodes well for a game platform to basically be made moot in less than a year with no backward compatibility.

Yankees 4 Life
Jul 1, 2007, 10:35 AM
so this should bring a few hundred thousand new customers to apple...

Zadillo
Jul 1, 2007, 10:38 AM
I think the scroll wheel can be emulated, but you would be stuck in portrait mode, using about a third of the screen for the display and the rest for a simulated scroll wheel and simulated buttons to the sides. I think it would be a nice idea, just not as nice as a game made for the new type of touch screen.

True. They could sort of emulate the experience; but I think it's more likely they'll just release iPhone specific games.

Actually, when the first "multitouch" and "all touchscreen device" patents surfaced, in my mind I imagined an iPod that would basically be like what the iPhone is, but the iPod mode would be like a "virtual iPod"..... that is, it would have the same screen space used for displaying music itself, and replicate a virtual scrollwheel so it was still like the same iconic iPod experience.

It didn't even occur to me that Apple would come up with a completely new interface concept for music and movies. Of course, this is why Apple is Apple...:)

Grimace
Jul 1, 2007, 11:10 AM
GREAT!! This is huge for businesses! :D

twoodcc
Jul 1, 2007, 11:11 AM
good. looking forward to more applications

AppleMan101
Jul 1, 2007, 11:36 AM
http://www.macrumors.com/images/macrumorsthreadlogo.gif (http://www.macrumors.com)

This does, however, represent at least one 3rd party application making its way to the iPhone.

Yahoo! and Google are third parties too...


This does, however, represent at least one another 3rd party application making its way to the iPhone.

Zadillo
Jul 1, 2007, 11:40 AM
Yahoo! and Google are third parties too...

Good point; since they're already built in, I don't think of them as third party apps.

I think the big question on everyone's mind really is going to be what kind of third party applications will be available, whether we'll be able to simply install them, etc.

The coolest thing of course would be if it was just a miniature Mac, and anyone could just install anything they like; but I can see why they want to avoid this (frankly I've had so many third party apps crash or make my Palm Treo 650 unstable that I almost avoid using them now, other than Salling Clicker and TomTom).

Hopefully there will be a good way to make it easy for even small developers to make it easy for iPhone users to get their apps, even if it means going through a verification process (sort of like the signed Symbian app stuff).

nydoofus
Jul 1, 2007, 11:44 AM
Their website is pretty confusing. I can't tell if its a Desktop Redirector or an application for the phone itself.

Zadillo
Jul 1, 2007, 11:45 AM
Their website is pretty confusing. I can't tell if its a Desktop Redirector or an application for the phone itself.

It's both. It involves a client you install as an app on your phone, and a desktop redirector.

-Zadillo

ourson66
Jul 1, 2007, 11:55 AM
The coolest thing of course would be if it was just a miniature Mac, and anyone could just install anything they like; but I can see why they want to avoid this (frankly I've had so many third party apps crash or make my Palm Treo 650 unstable that I almost avoid using them now, other than Salling Clicker and TomTom).

Hopefully there will be a good way to make it easy for even small developers to make it easy for iPhone users to get their apps, even if it means going through a verification process (sort of like the signed Symbian app stuff).

I was of the impression that the iPhone was running a "lite" version of Mac OS X, which gets its stability because of Unix's protected memory and kernel. It's exceedingly rare to have a misbehaving app kill the entire OS on Mac, so I'm not sure how or why the Apple people are so concerned about stability on the iPhone (if indeed they are - i'm just going based on several replies to this thread that apparently "Apple" is concerned). Mac OS X is inherently FAR more stable than PalmOS ever was, so I don't think this is a fair comparison at all.

Avatar74
Jul 1, 2007, 12:04 PM
They have a bunch of pissed of corporate customers..

I would disagree with that statement because iphone is an expensive device to begin with. There's no way in hell my company would pay for even our directors or VP's to use these. When it comes to luxury gadgets, they flourish more in the consumer market where there are no hard limits to spending or any real requirement to rationalize or cost justify what are generally emotion-driven purchases. By contrast, most corporations have management wanting to do things as cheaply as possible to maximize profits.

Granted, there may be some businesses that will go for the iPhone but the consumer market will always be the bigger target. Consequently supporting Exchange is not their biggest priority.

I don't think, also, that it's wise for them to support business accounts at this point until the kinks of exchange support have been worked out because they're likely to have much higher expectations and possible legal action from corporate spenders if they deploy to businesses prematurely.

Zadillo
Jul 1, 2007, 12:18 PM
I was of the impression that the iPhone was running a "lite" version of Mac OS X, which gets its stability because of Unix's protected memory and kernel. It's exceedingly rare to have a misbehaving app kill the entire OS on Mac, so I'm not sure how or why the Apple people are so concerned about stability on the iPhone (if indeed they are - i'm just going based on several replies to this thread that apparently "Apple" is concerned). Mac OS X is inherently FAR more stable than PalmOS ever was, so I don't think this is a fair comparison at all.

From at least what Jobs and Apple have claimed, the concern wasn't about third party apps affecting the stability of the iPhone itself. They claim the concern is what unsigned apps, etc. might be able to do to the network they run on.

Personally I'm not sure how justified this is. It has always struck me more as an excuse until they do sort out how to handle third party development.

But at the same time, Symbian for example does have something similar with the concept of "signed" apps that have gone through some certification process, so it perhaps isn't unheard of.

The thing is, Palm OS and Windows Mobile do not have any limitations like this, and I don't think I've heard of any rogue Palm OS or Windows Mobile apps bringing down a mobile phone network or something.

-Zadillo

phatspider
Jul 1, 2007, 01:04 PM
Thats interesting - Vodafones email service (Vodafone Business Email) is powered by Visto - could be something to do with a certain network tie up and launch in around about q3 :)

safXmal
Jul 1, 2007, 01:21 PM
Why would Visto need to have an application on the iPhone itself? Wouldn't it be enough to have a translator on the exchange server?

Personally I think Apple should not give in to the pressure to make the iPhone exchange compatible. Here again, as with flash, they have the opportunity to force the industry to use open standards iso proprietary systems.

When they can sell the iPhone to CEO's, those CEO's will make sure that the IT department makes the system work with iPhone.

elgruga
Jul 1, 2007, 01:28 PM
I am tired of naysayers - EVERYONE will want an iPhone.
Business users happen to be consumers, in fact 'business' types are rabid consumers, they invented consumerism!

Enough of this 'business users wont buy the iPhone because blah blah' - YES THEY WILL, BABY!

The iPhone is so far ahead of all the crap out there that only a few wont be completely hypnotised by this thing.

Give in - the iPhone has won, and its only day two!

I will give my Razr away and get an iPhone the day they arrive in Canada......and thats a promise.

Oh, I'm a business user - run all my sales from my phone, BTW.

svento
Jul 1, 2007, 01:47 PM
Given that the iPhone supports VPN, I wonder if sys-admins will just set up IMAP through a VPN to access Exchange?

Now if only Apple could support a Cisco VPN in their built-in software! It seems like every company I know of uses the Cisco VPN... this was never an issue on the Mac since Cisco has a 3rd part client...

The kicker for me is that my company actually supports IMAP mail via their exchange server... unfortunately I can't get to the server!!!

loudog40
Jul 1, 2007, 02:16 PM
Given that the iPhone supports VPN, I wonder if sys-admins will just set up IMAP through a VPN to access Exchange?

Yes, but they you have to be on VPN all the time. Accessing webpages via EDGE is slow enough, but doing everything through a VPN will only make things more painful. Also, corporate users with RSA keys will have to type in their password every time.

AAAAND, there's no calender or contact syncing via ActiveSync. :(

macintel4me
Jul 1, 2007, 02:48 PM
Tell me if I'm understanding this correctly...

1) Apple's iPhone Exchange Support (IMAP) = unencrypted, pull
2) Visto's iPhone Exchange Support = encrypted, pull
3) Blackberry Exchange Support = encrypted, push

Is that right?

patrickr135
Jul 1, 2007, 03:47 PM
Has anyone tried using OWA? (not that it is a long-term solution but may get me through a couple of months)

Yankees 4 Life
Jul 1, 2007, 04:16 PM
hey naysayers... lets wait until the thing comes out for iphone(like for my iPhone) and we can judge it...

manu chao
Jul 1, 2007, 04:47 PM
1) Apple's iPhone Exchange Support (IMAP) = unencrypted, pull
2) Visto's iPhone Exchange Support = encrypted, pull
3) Blackberry Exchange Support = encrypted, push


Standard IMAP is certainly unencrypted (except for the username and password) and pull. My impression is also that Visto is encrypted (whether it is pull or push, I don't know) and Blackberry as well (in addition to being push).

Where Yahoo's push e-mail fits in, I am not sure. I think it is an extension of IMAP, therefore push but unencrypted.

(And I guess it is going to take quite a while until we see PGP encrypted e-mail on the iPhone, but maybe IMAP push (Yahoo?) over VPN will happen in the not too distant future.)

macguitarman
Jul 1, 2007, 05:27 PM
dupe, sorry

macguitarman
Jul 1, 2007, 05:28 PM
This sounds like good news. But its not clear what this gives us.

1) I have already tested OWA (Outlook Web Access) and it does work.
It connects to our Exchange server (OWA), which is the Exchange server's info presented publically via webmail.

You have to login on the Safari webpage, and typing in webmail on the iphone is not great,

Oh, yeah this is of course over Wi-Fi, any web action over Edge, as we all know, is jokingly slooow, practically unusable.

2) Putting software on your Win PC computer at work in order to use this as a conduit, is usually not sanctioned in most IT depts (actually stupid and unnecessary).

We strongly do not recommend it, in fact all personal file sharing to individual machines is turned off if we see, there is no reason for it, users save their work to servers and users can get to all of their data anywhere / anytime via VPN.

(By the way we use a hardware based VPN solution by Juniper, SSL VPN. Access via a web browser, no VPN client).

So this web browser / webmail access is not a solution at all, not on the iPhone.

And this desktop as a conduit, is not going to happen. It can and should just be at the server level, that is what servers are for. Not to mention many of my users, don't have a Win PC for a desktop, only a Mac. So what good does that do.

3) Software installed on the iPhone, not sure about this, SJ has already said, only AJAX apps for third parties, perhaps this will be how it is done.

4) This is not a replacement for Mac Mail app on the iPhone, just a way to connect. I don't know about you but iPhone Mail App is just awesome, kicking butt, better than 10.4 Mail app.

I want no other interface / GUI for doing Mail on the iPhone, it is the best looking / functioning Mail app I have ever seen.

5) I have always said, it would be great if Mac Mail app (on OS X) could be pointed to the OWA server (which is a public address, not the actual Exchange server), input all your info and we la, you can get mail that way.

6) Installing Visto's software on the Exchange server. I don't even know about this. OWA server, yes a better chance. Even if it is Windows software and works flawlessly, Win IT guys are usually unwilling to do this, and if / when the OWA / Exchange server acts up, oh, it's that Mac software (even though it is really Windows software) you installed on the server for the iPhone.

7) What is the cost, all I know is, it needs to be cheap, easy and not a big deal for the Exchange admins, if it is not, it won't get installed.

Perhaps this is ActiveSync, or activesync like functionality, ported to the ARM processor / iPhone OS X.

Daniel Eran has made a good point, Active Sync does not exist for OS X, much less ARM / iPhone OS X, MS has little incentive to port this, either does Apple to perpetuate MS / Active Sync.

What will it be, as I said, cheap, easy, rock solid, and stays totally out of the way or no go.

macguitaman@mac.com

Compufix
Jul 1, 2007, 05:44 PM
It's both. It involves a client you install as an app on your phone, and a desktop redirector.

Originally my Nextel Blackberry needed a desktop app to redirect email...and although a PITA...it worked....

Now we have a Blackberry Enterprise Server which talks to Exchange and pushes the mail to the phone....so why wouldn't Apple add a similar function to OSX Server to push mail and calander events to iPhone. Would make sense...and give OSX server a Enterprise function that would help get it in the door.

Although it SHOULD come from MS, Apples needs a decent mail/calander/contacts/to do app that talks to Exchange along par with Outlook on Windows.

We use Entourage which gets the job done....but still nowhere near perfect.

Why not build in a "Crossover" style system in OSX Server and run a Windows developed MAPI client that talks directly to Exchange (or a OSX Naitive app) that can have users added to it, then a code entered on an app on the phone to set up secure communications and authorization (like how Blackberry currently works).

What is so hard about implementing MAPI on OSX? If PALM and Nextel and others can implement MAPI on Windows...why can't someone on OSX do it?

-Compufix

macguitarman
Jul 1, 2007, 05:52 PM
>>>>>Although it SHOULD come from MS, Apples needs a decent mail/calander/contacts/to do app that talks to Exchange along par with Outlook on Windows.


Exactly, this architecture is in Leopard server, to hook into the Exchange server and present calendar events to Macs in iCal. But this costs an OS X server. A Win IT director wont justify the cost of it. Most do not want Macs (servers) in the data center, it pisses them off. (good).

For Calendar functionality get Snerdware's GroupCal

But it helps to have at least one OS X server in your data center if you have Macs.

Check out Daniel Erans articles on this at roughlydrafted.com, he breaks this whole Active Sync, etc, stuff down nicely.

Also, most companies will not support Both an OWA / Active Sync mobile solution (not sure of the cost but if you are already an MS shop, IT guys dont mind, AND another separate Blackberry server.

Not going to happen. Not in a widespread way anyway. Many IT depts. will say we only support Windows Mobile / Active Sync and if you have a Blackberry, you are not supported, SOL.

Of course depends how many Blackberry carrying VIP's put pressure on the IT dept to support both, but it is not usual, it is one or the other.

gerogev
Jul 1, 2007, 05:57 PM
Check out this from the AT&T website

http://www.wireless.att.com/businesssupport/knowledgeBase.do?content=KB80815.html

Plus, you need to re-activate your international access.

Sorry. No push email from exchange. EDGE instead of 3G.

I know the interface is cool but people need to work on these things rather than just show them to their awestruck friends.

Frankly, I would assume anyone with one of these must not really have any business existence at all.

newamiga
Jul 1, 2007, 06:20 PM
Actually as a corporate executive for an IT company, I can tell you there is a great deal of interest on our part to be able to move our execs over the the iPhone. There is considerable disappointment on our side that we cannot, because of ATT's activation policies. I sent Steve Jobs an email. Who knows if he will answer or even read it, but I think they need to be aware of the tons of corporate users out here who would love to switch from our Treos to iPhones. Guess I will see if he or someone from Apple responds.

Cybbe
Jul 1, 2007, 06:21 PM
Yahoo! and Google are third parties too...
Yes, but mail.app, Safari and Google Maps are all applications designed and programmed by Apple (yes, even Google Maps). Google delivers the backend network service, Apple designed the application. Actually, at the D5 interview, Jobs went on about how not being restricted to a web environment allowed Apple to design a magnificent application superior of Google's online version. I certainly see the irony in this considering which environment they're offering to third party programmers..

catdog02481
Jul 1, 2007, 06:30 PM
Has anyone tried using OWA? (not that it is a long-term solution but may get me through a couple of months)


YES!
OWA works perfectly using safari and is superfast over wifi and acceptable over edge. In fact i am using it now and am planning on chucking my BB (already returned my 8830 to verizon and went back to old 7250 until i have full confidence in iphone/coverage then it's bye bye verizon and BB/was great until iphone showed up)

macguitarman
Jul 1, 2007, 06:37 PM
I remind everyone of this, it is coming, this just is one announcement, of the several SJ hinted at.

http://www.usatoday.com/tech/techinvestor/corporatenews/2007-06-28-jobs-stephenson-qa_N.htm

Q: What about corporate e-mail? I understand that's an issue for many consumers, who may not be able to hook up to their company networks?

Jobs: You'll be hearing more about this in the coming weeks. We have some pilots going with companies with names you'll recognize. This won't be a big issue.

This asssured me that there is as I said a viable, innocuous solution coming, perhaps several options.

newamiga e-mail / call me on my iPhone, I am a Mac IT professional, would be glad to bounce ideas off you, be rest assured this will all be possible, despite what is ATT saying to the contrary, just be assured by what SJ has said, it says it all.

He and Apple have anticipated this and have plans.

macguitarman@mac.com

voicegy
Jul 1, 2007, 06:46 PM
Has anyone tried using OWA? (not that it is a long-term solution but may get me through a couple of months)

Yes, I have to for now, as Exchange is our system in one of the largest school districts in the country - fortunately, I work in IT and am close to the email admins, and we've been discussing Exchange and the iPhone for a number of weeks. It would be SO MUCH BETTER for my Exchange email to work like my .mac account does on the iPhone - and the OWA on anything-other-than-IE experience is about as lame as you can get.

Something good will happen with the relationship between Exchange and the iPhone eventually - for now, as with all IT departments, we hesitate to simply turn on POP or IMAP for security reasons - we're mostly a cautious group. (By the way, MANY folks in my IT dept. use and love Macs.)

macguitarman
Jul 1, 2007, 06:56 PM
Simply turning on IMAP on an Exchange server, is not a security risk.

The Exchnage server is not available to anyone outside the company network, only inside / on the company network.

And one must autheticate via AD.

I wish people would stop spreading this that turning on IMAP is an automatic security risk.

We have it on, Macs use Mac Mai app internally.

rob@robburns.co
Jul 1, 2007, 07:54 PM
I have always said, it would be great if Mac Mail app (on OS X) could be pointed to the OWA server (which is a public address, not the actual Exchange server), input all your info and we la, you can get mail that way.

This is how Entourage accesses the Exchange server. This would be the next teir of client support for Exchange (after IMAP). Unfortunately, some IT Admins are afraid to even make Outlook Web Access available to clients.

I think there will be big news about Exchange and, more importantly, broad adoption of non-proprietary alternatives to Exchange. Someone mentioned Leopard server and calendar server, but that project is completely open source and available at:

http://www.calendarserver.org/

There are many excieting projects that related to Darwin Calendar server and the CalDAV standard: including ActiveSync open source clients.

rob@robburns.co
Jul 1, 2007, 08:02 PM
Simply turning on IMAP on an Exchange server, is not a security risk.

My understanding is the only thing missing from Exchange's implementation of IMAP is quotas. If IT wants to impose quotas and use IMAP you have to use a different IMAP solution (i.e, drop Exchange).

Someone else has mentioned that the Mail client on iPhone does not have SSL/TLS. I think this has to be a short-term software issue. I haven't verified that's iPhone doesn't support IMAP and POP over SSL, but if it is I'm sure it will be addressed soon.

Finally, push mail definitely seems like the right way to do things, but how much does it matter to the end-user. Set your client to every minute. You have unlimited data and the communication with the server sill not bog down other operations. If anything this is a very small problem for AT&T and their network: not for anyone using an iPhone.

theb3freak
Jul 1, 2007, 08:27 PM
iPod games wouldn't work on the iPhone.

Besides, iPod games are mostly designed around the presence and use of the scrollwheel.

I would not be surprised to see games made available for the iPhone, but I think they would be games specifically made for it.

Simple enough - Apple edits the software to provide a touchscreen scrollwheel, and now the iPhone plays with iPod games!

Zadillo
Jul 1, 2007, 08:31 PM
Simple enough - Apple edits the software to provide a touchscreen scrollwheel, and now the iPhone plays with iPod games!

Yeah, not saying that couldn't be done, but it seems like it would be kind of a half-assed solution that Apple wouldn't normally do. It seems more likely they'd have people create updated iPhone specific games.

SeaFox
Jul 1, 2007, 08:37 PM
Visto Mobile for the iPhone will be available in "late Q3 2007". A free 60-day trial will be offered (www.vistomobile.com/iphone) when its released. There is no other word on pricing.

Prediction: Visto's software will not be a purchasable solution. It will be a service. Note they are offering a sixty-day trail, but it doesn't say trial version. Yet another monthly fee for your iPhone service.

A Pittarelli
Jul 1, 2007, 08:37 PM
exchange server support is good incentive for the business community to switch, heres hoping it works properly

Random Ping
Jul 1, 2007, 08:55 PM
Frankly, I would assume anyone with one of these must not really have any business existence at all. (emphasis added)

That is a silly statement in its sweepingness. Certainly there are many people for whom the iPhone, in its current form, will not work. But there is not a single, uniform profile for business people, just as there isn't for consumers.

I suspect Apple executives are highly aware of these different groups, their usage patterns, which features are "must haves", and which features are "nice to have". And they probably have estimates of how many additional iPhones they will sell by adding each new feature, and these probably form the basis of their attack plan for iPhone updates.

The conspiracy theory question is: Are either Apple or AT&T purposely leaving out certain features to avoid conflict with certain business segments?

For example, AT&T sells the BlackBerry Curve (using the EDGE network, incidently). Maybe they don't want the iPhone to collide with the BB market. Or maybe Apple wants the iPhone to be seen as "hip", so they don't want it to be seen as a business device. As an example in a different business, Toyota fights very hard to promote the idea that the Toyota Prius doesn't need to be plugged in (in fact, it cannot be plugged in), so Toyota has been hesitant to develop and promote a plug-in hybrid.

Rocketman
Jul 1, 2007, 09:15 PM
I want my iPhone locked in exchange for $10 more per month than the absolute minimum I could pay if I was willing to forgo 30% of the imbedded features.

Rocketman

RDF victim and happy.

"The conspiracy theory question is: Are either Apple or AT&T purposely leaving out certain features to avoid conflict with certain business segments?"

Apple is the historical champion of crippleware with "blessed" value-added features.

rob@robburns.co
Jul 1, 2007, 10:51 PM
Tell me if I'm understanding this correctly...

1) Apple's iPhone Exchange Support (IMAP) = unencrypted, pull

No encrypted via SSL/TLS. Yes pull (at very data-efficient 1 min intervals; i.e., you might have to wait as much as 60 seconds to find out about a received email)

2) Visto's iPhone Exchange Support = encrypted, pull

Presumably

3) Blackberry Exchange Support = encrypted, push

Yes

Is that right?

As far as we know now. The other issue is that Exchange clients use three different channels that are largely equivalent (but IT Admins often fear two of them):

1) ActiveSync
2) Outlook Web Access (OWA) over HTTPS
3) IMAP

IT admins often think that other than the first one, the others may be subject to security risks because Microsoft did not create them. That may sound strange to sane people, but many IT managers actually think this way. If your companies business ITs think this way than they're may be no support for your Exchange server available through anything other than ActiveSync. If that's the case you won't be accessing Exchange from your iPhone even though methods to do so already exist.

Random Ping
Jul 1, 2007, 10:58 PM
Visto Mobile for the iPhone will be available in "late Q3 2007".

Given that Exchange support for the iPhone is just a software update away, this may be a risky investment for Visto. Overnight Apple, should it so choose, could wipe out the need for this service.

One of the primary advantages about the iPhone are that (1) it is all about the software, (2) Apple controls the software, and (3) the software is trivial to update. This means that the iPhone someone owns today may be a very different device 6-12 months from now.

Zadillo
Jul 1, 2007, 11:05 PM
Given that Exchange support for the iPhone is just a software update away, this may be a risky investment for Visto. Overnight Apple, should it so choose, could wipe out the need for this service.

One of the primary advantages about the iPhone are that (1) it is all about the software, (2) Apple controls the software, and (3) the software is trivial to update. This means that the iPhone someone owns today may be a very different device 6-12 months from now.

Considering that neither Symbian, Microsoft or Palm have done what you suggested to make Visto's solutions for their respective platforms worthless, I somehow don't think Apple's going to be the one to do it first.

We shouldn't get carried away with this "its all about the software" idea; Symbian, Palm OS and Windows Mobile are all platforms with just as much capacity to have updates added to the underlying software, or at least bundled apps, etc. (not even counting that they do offer full third party app development now, while Apple does not).

sato123
Jul 2, 2007, 01:24 PM
Hi,

I don't think Visto will install anything on the iPhone.
Whether it's Visto or any of the other push email provider(except RIM), there is no need to install anything on the iPhone.
There are 2 main ways to offer mobile mail one for personal use and one labeled for corporate use.

The personal one provides a small app on your desktop that uses the MAPI protocol to communicate with Exchange on your behalf. It reads your email, and communicate with an external server, sending him your email; who go and push it out to your mobile phone using a proprietary protocol. In the case of the iPhone you can just use safari to connect to that server and have a "web based/ajax enabled" email interface, and as long as safari connection is open to that server, new email can be pushed to you and it will be protected using ssl.

The corporate variant don't require any installation on your PC, it's usually a server in your intranet that connects directly with your exchange, and get the emails on your behalf and send them again to an external server using a propriatary protocol, to which you connect either using an application on your phone or using a web browser for the iPhone.

Visto announcement, won't necessarily mean that an application will be installed on the iphone.

sato