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MacRumors
Aug 13, 2007, 07:12 AM
http://www.macrumors.com/images/macrumorsthreadlogo.gif (http://www.macrumors.com)

NYPost.com writes (http://www.nypost.com/seven/08122007/business/nintendo_and_apple_platforms_are_gaming_each_other_business_damon_brown.htm) what appears to be a mostly speculative piece about the possibility of games in the Apple iPhone.

Not much new information is provided, but in the past, there had been reports (http://www.macrumors.com/2007/02/09/iphone-games-in-the-works-from-3rd-party-developers/) that Apple was courting game developers for the iPhone.

Specifically, Electronic Arts' mobile division had been quoted as saying that they had been talking to Apple about games on the iPhone. Electronic Arts would be a natural fit as they are already amongst the few developers who have been releasing new games for the iPod.

Meanwhile, independent development efforts continue on the iPhone with unofficial applications popping up daily. An NES emulator (http://code.google.com/p/iphonenes/) and non-playable port of Doom (http://code.google.com/p/iphonedoom/) have been released for the iPhone. Due to the procedure required to install these applications onto your iPhone, these applications remain available only to interested hobbyists rather than the general public.

Article Link (http://www.macrumors.com/2007/08/13/official-iphone-games-in-the-works/)



roundobi
Aug 13, 2007, 07:19 AM
Its about time, the whole fuctionality is there. The gaming possibilities are so open. I dont know how easy it will be though, on the camera app I always accidentally press the camera button until i found i could hold it, then it takes when you release.

Porshuh944turbo
Aug 13, 2007, 07:31 AM
I'm just waiting for iPhone NES to get better and more usable!

mainstreetmark
Aug 13, 2007, 07:41 AM
I'll never understand the philosophy of allowing only certain companies to develop games for these 'i' devices.

diamond.g
Aug 13, 2007, 08:10 AM
I'll never understand the philosophy of allowing only certain companies to develop games for these 'i' devices.
More control. Just like how only certain companies can make games for consoles.

jwa276
Aug 13, 2007, 08:11 AM
I really hope this is true. I'm dying to have some new fully supported functionality for my iPhone! It's very exciting to see how people's individual efforts for hacking have been going, but for me it really comes down to what is supported.

I would only consider doing a hack to the iPhone if someday I could get my TomTom Bluetooth GPS receiver to work with google maps (wishful thinking, I know). Then, and only then, would I be willing to give up syncing with iTunes.

alywa
Aug 13, 2007, 08:29 AM
It seems like a forgone conclusion that there will, eventually, be games for the iPhone. Apple is a smart company... they will make sure the games are good, stable, and profitable. I imagine the same thing is true with ringtones.

I predict a fall release when OS 1.1 is released (purely wild speculation).

mainstreetmark
Aug 13, 2007, 09:17 AM
More control. Just like how only certain companies can make games for consoles.

Allowing anyone to write apps for the Apple, Mac, PC, etc, is what made them what they are today.

But, I suppose you all agree with that.

fixyourthinking
Aug 13, 2007, 10:06 AM
I've been playing the iPhone Duck Hunt

It's very cool and requires that you just visit the URL:

http://orangeburgyoungprofessionals.com/duckhunt/

I think it's even fun to play on the mac using the mouse

A Pittarelli
Aug 13, 2007, 10:54 AM
when the nes emulator is fully working it should be awe3some

yetanotherdave
Aug 13, 2007, 11:15 AM
http://www.macrumors.com/images/macrumorsthreadlogo.gif (http://www.macrumors.com)
Specifically, Electronic Arts' mobile division had been quoted as saying that they had been talking to Apple about games on the iPhone. Electronic Arts would be a natural fit as they are already amongst the few developers who have been releasing new games for the iPod.

Article Link (http://www.macrumors.com/2007/08/13/official-iphone-games-in-the-works/)

Lets just hope they don't make promises then abandon them without any recognition whatsoever ie. games on the mac promised as WWDC

filmgirl
Aug 13, 2007, 11:19 AM
More control. Just like how only certain companies can make games for consoles.

Well, sort of. It's only done that way in the video game industry because Nintendo didn't want Atari to make games for their systems (because Atari was doing their own versions of games that Nintendo was releasing in house, like Tetris - hence, Tengen Tetris for NES is worth a small fortune) - so they started the whole "officially licensed" thing and required game manufacturers to pay for a license/dev kit to be able to make games for their systems. I think the court case between Atari and Nintendo that went on for 8 or 9 years ended with Nintendo agreeing to let Atari become a licensed third party (though I don't think they ever did release an officially licensed game for any Nintendo system until Atari's name was essentially purchased by a different game company - the 3-DO guy maybe - too long ago - so even then, Atari game in name only) and Atari agreeing to pay whatever royalties you have to pay as a licensed game company.

Because Nintendo did what they did in 1985, Sega, NEC, Atari themselves (in a hilarious bit of irony - though the Jaguar fiasco was post lawsuit I think) and of course Sony and now Microsoft adopted the same policy. That doesn't mean that unofficial homebrew games can't be created/sold - but your market is going to be miniscule (I had some awful Wisdom Tree Bible game for the NES when I was little - it sucked and almost broke my system, but other than Tengen Baseball, it's the only unofficial commercial game I've ever had) and most retailers won't carry you. That's completely different from the PC gaming world where anyone can make a game. Of course, when you are talking about a system that is designed to run each and every game without hassle (unlike a PC that can have any number of configurations), the argument for quality control can be and should be made - bringing me to my point...

while I agree that the PC (and I mean PC in the global sense - not just Windows - Mac too) is what it is because of the structure that allows anyone to develop for any platform, when you have a device like a video game console, an iPod or an iPhone - having a process by which you can require company's to be licensed before the software/game is officially endorsed makes 100% sense. There is an expectation with a video game (and that's the model that it would make sense for iPhone to adopt because the hardware and OS are standardized the same way a video game system is standardized) that it will just work - the consumer doesn't have to deal with buggy software loader issue or sound problems or freeze-ups. The game should just play. To ensure that that can happen, Apple has to keep some sort of control over what commercial apps can be released for their platform, or at least - released with their approval that it will work.

That doesn't mean homebrew apps and open source stuff can't continue to come along and work great - but the average consumer isn't going to want to bother with having to hack their iPhone to play a game - they want to download it and have it work.

Still, this is good, if not unexpected news. I have a friend who works for the mobile division at EA - I'll try to get her to give me any word on anything they are preparing.

chr1s60
Aug 13, 2007, 12:28 PM
If EA is going to release games for iPhone that is pretty cool. I do see two possible negatives though. First off, EA usually does pretty detailed games so there is a good chance that any game they release for iPhone will take up quite a bit of storage. The second negative could be the price. EA charges $50 for computer or video games. I am sure iPhone games would be much cheaper than that, but he price would likely be more expensive than the $5 price tag for many of the iPod games. The price tag will be even more expensive if they release versions of their sports games because of the licensing. I am interested to see what happens with this.

BornAgainMac
Aug 13, 2007, 12:31 PM
EA, please make C&C 3 for the iPhone. Then make an announcment next year that you will release tha games in July. :D

David G.
Aug 13, 2007, 01:21 PM
Lets say that the next iPod runs pretty much the same downgraded OS that is on the iPhone. Is there any chance that if this is true, the games will work on both the iPhone and the iPod?

pohl
Aug 13, 2007, 02:20 PM
More control. Just like how only certain companies can make games for consoles.

Another hypothesis: they want to start with a limited set of partners until they know they've arrived at a good API they can give to everybody else. API design is hard in the first place, but an API for an entirely new kind of device and user interface doubly so, at least.

bigbossbmb
Aug 13, 2007, 02:58 PM
Lets say that the next iPod runs pretty much the same downgraded OS that is on the iPhone. Is there any chance that if this is true, the games will work on both the iPhone and the iPod?

I would say that is a definite possibility. It makes sense. It is the "If the iPod gets..." that's the unknown. and that is a big IF.

alec
Aug 13, 2007, 03:02 PM
Pong, Tiger Woods Golf, Madden, and Super Mario 3???

Mudo
Aug 13, 2007, 03:04 PM
Oh, like nobody saw that one coming.

DopestGingah
Aug 13, 2007, 03:55 PM
As long as they make some games better than that web based Duck Hunt, I will be more than happy!

diamond.g
Aug 13, 2007, 05:05 PM
Another hypothesis: they want to start with a limited set of partners so they can charge more

Fixed. :D

washer
Aug 13, 2007, 05:20 PM
did EA ever say anything more about C&C and all of those games they promised? whats the deal? and id too right?

Doctor Q
Aug 13, 2007, 07:19 PM
Didn't Apple claim that providing Flash support would make too much processing demand on the iPhone? So why would games be OK but Flash not OK?

SPUY767
Aug 14, 2007, 05:19 AM
More control. Just like how only certain companies can make games for consoles.

For console makers, it has nothing to do with control. It's about who is willing to pay the exorbitant console licensing fees. Remember, the iPhone makes money for Apple, something the console makers only dream of. Besides, if it was about control, I don't think that they would have allowed some of the games I've seen. Apple, on the other hand, needs to control tightly the code that goes on their phone, lest some error frought code brings down the network. People who hack their own games on to the iPhone, understand the risk and are not going to blame Apple when their phone has to be reset.

Didn't Apple claim that providing Flash support would make too much processing demand on the iPhone? So why would games be OK but Flash not OK?

Because flash brings my laptop to its knees, and my laptop has a 1.86 Core Duo. The difference is really astounding, flash isn't multi threaded, thank god, and sometimes, when I've got a flash heavy website up, the flash handler can take 30-40% of the available processor time.

twoodcc
Aug 15, 2007, 03:52 PM
i hope this is true. looking forward to iPhone games

brainless
Aug 17, 2007, 03:15 AM
Apple, on the other hand, needs to control tightly the code that goes on their phone, lest some error frought code brings down the network.

This is really a huge MYTH introduced by Jobs at Macworld speech, but it has no reasons in the real world. How can you bring down the network by whatever malfunctioning iPhone ? What can it do ? Making calls (one at a time), sending SMS (those 160 overpriced bytes of data), and using GPRS/EDGE at whopping 100 kB/s - how can this bring network down ?
iPhone runs MacOS X, similar to the desktop version. I can imagine if this platform is hostile to viruses and spam, it can generate some traffic that can be issue to the network, but in such case all of us, desktop users, are in trouble as well. Is this a case ? I don't think so.

Yes, an application can be written poorly, with bugs etc. but such vendor will go away by the means of the free market (in the long term no one wants to buy a bad SW), thus any regulation in that regard is not neccessary.

The only reason iPhone is not open for third party applications is that Apple wants to collect huge fees from the publishers and also split the revenues from the single sold copy, in the way iTunes works. But at least, there are freebies in iTunes.

iPhone needs to open up !

diamond.g
Aug 17, 2007, 06:41 AM
For console makers, it has nothing to do with control. It's about who is willing to pay the exorbitant console licensing fees. Remember, the iPhone makes money for Apple, something the console makers only dream of. Besides, if it was about control, I don't think that they would have allowed some of the games I've seen. Apple, on the other hand, needs to control tightly the code that goes on their phone, lest some error frought code brings down the network. People who hack their own games on to the iPhone, understand the risk and are not going to blame Apple when their phone has to be reset.


Yeah, licensing fees are apart of it. But if you think Nintendo has ever launched a console at a lost, then you are sadly mistaken. Sony, and MS started the loss leading thing. And they do control what games get put on the systems, which is why you see zero AO games for them. Google Manhunt 2.
The whole code bringing down the network is complete crap. You can get software for the Treo's/Windows Mobile phones and none of it has ever brought down any call network.

thomasfxlt
Aug 17, 2007, 07:08 AM
This is really a huge MYTH introduced by Jobs at Macworld speech, but it has no reasons in the real world. How can you bring down the network by whatever malfunctioning iPhone ? What can it do ? Making calls (one at a time), sending SMS (those 160 overpriced bytes of data), and using GPRS/EDGE at whopping 100 kB/s - how can this bring network down ?
iPhone runs MacOS X, similar to the desktop version. I can imagine if this platform is hostile to viruses and spam, it can generate some traffic that can be issue to the network, but in such case all of us, desktop users, are in trouble as well. Is this a case ? I don't think so.

Yes, an application can be written poorly, with bugs etc. but such vendor will go away by the means of the free market (in the long term no one wants to buy a bad SW), thus any regulation in that regard is not neccessary.

The only reason iPhone is not open for third party applications is that Apple wants to collect huge fees from the publishers and also split the revenues from the single sold copy, in the way iTunes works. But at least, there are freebies in iTunes.

iPhone needs to open up !

I won't argue that there's some motivation in the revenue opportunity, but primarily Apple is protecting the integrity of the stability of the iPhone. 3rd party apps are a huge risk to the device at this early stage of Apple's foray into the cellular market.

diamond.g
Aug 17, 2007, 07:22 AM
3rd party apps are a huge risk to the device at this early stage of Apple's foray into the cellular market.
How so?

brainless
Aug 17, 2007, 02:41 PM
3rd party apps are a huge risk to the device at this early stage of Apple's foray into the cellular market.


Third party apps are what they are. With some 20+ years of happy co-existence of BFU and third party apps on the PC noone will blame iPhone for bad applications.

What I consider real foolish is idea that only 3rd party apps should be served from within the browser. This is not going to work from the very nature of the mobile phones - there are situations you need to run an application even if there is no network coverage. iPhone is ill designed in that regard.

I give Apple a mulligan till the end of the year to open up the platform - I undestand there was so many issues to work on and 3rd party apps might not be high on the priority list, but it is impossible for iPhone to survive without 3rd party support.