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Ipaqman
Oct 2, 2007, 11:23 PM
hey all,

i was using my shure e500 headphones a few minutes ago which were connected to my ipod touch. i accidentally turned the volume on the touch up full blast with the headphones still plugged in and didnt realize that the sound was coming from the headphones... thought it was coming from the speaker on the computer. will that damage the headphones?

ipaqman



oreoremix42
Oct 3, 2007, 12:16 AM
Yes it can depending on how many watts( the amount of power being put out) by the ipod and how many watts the speakers in the headphone can take it can but i dont know what power handling your headphones have

Ipaqman
Oct 3, 2007, 12:19 AM
actually it was playing from my macbook pro.

Speaker Type: Triple TruAcoustic MicroSpeakers
Sensitivity (1mW): 119 dB SPL/mW
Impedance (1kHz): 36
Frequency Range: 18Hz 19kHz

does that help?

Vigilante
Oct 3, 2007, 12:19 AM
Most decent headsets are made to withstand that, so I doubt that they are damaged after one time. I have cheapy earbuds that I have used as poor mans speakers... they still work okay. To avoid this occuring again (if this occurs many times it will eventually break them), you can cap the volume on your iPod Touch.

Go to Settings -> Music -> Volume limit, and put it a little higher than what your normal volume will be. If you ever want to go higher on the volume, you can always go back here again and temporarily raise the level.

If this is on your Macbook, I don't know squat about Macs, go bash it against a wall or something :p

Ipaqman
Oct 3, 2007, 12:33 AM
can't find the power specs for the macbook pro but here is the specs for the headphones:

Speaker Type: Triple TruAcoustic MicroSpeakers
Sensitivity (1mW): 119 dB SPL/mW
Impedance (1kHz): 36
Frequency Range: 18Hz 19kHz

would it damage them?

oreoremix42
Oct 3, 2007, 01:03 AM
can't find the power specs for the macbook pro but here is the specs for the headphones:

Speaker Type: Triple TruAcoustic MicroSpeakers
Sensitivity (1mW): 119 dB SPL/mW
Impedance (1kHz): 36
Frequency Range: 18Hz 19kHz

would it damage them?


No probably not that is good amount of power for headphone to be withstand and hitting 119dbs is nuts a jut air craft hits 100 dbs barely when it takes off lol

Ipaqman
Oct 3, 2007, 01:16 AM
the macbook pro doesn't even produce close to that coming out of the headphone jack does it?

thanks for your help. sorry i just want to make sure that it didnt just damage the headphones in any way as they were really expensive.

ipaqman

oreoremix42
Oct 3, 2007, 01:27 AM
Yea with the power coming out of the speakers in the mac book they arent a match but also remember they have less air to move being right on your ear but as far as damage to them most headphones can handle that and definately if they are exspensive they should be able to most of the time when a headphone/ speaker gets to it maxs it start bottoming out to where there isnt as good of quality coming out that most of the time means to much power is being pumped into the speaker and will probably blow. The sound is kind of like a rattel

shigzeo
Oct 3, 2007, 07:16 AM
the macbook pro is much louder output than that of the ipod touch headphone jack. much more powerful. i can use my dt880 unamped and it will be too loud, but with any ipod, i can turn the volume all the way up and not be too bothered.

you should avoid ever doing that to you 399$ usd property. listen to them. if you hear rattle or lapse of bass, mid or hi from one or both sides, you have damaged them. shure is quite good with customers, they may replace them, but usually that has to do with manufactures defects. that said, the e500 has some professionals on budget in mind and they use powerful wireless amps that undoubtedly are pushed quite far close to 110 or so db. i hope all is well with your shures.

Krezyl
Nov 6, 2007, 10:36 PM
hey all,

i was using my shure e500 headphones a few minutes ago which were connected to my ipod touch. i accidentally turned the volume on the touch up full blast with the headphones still plugged in and didnt realize that the sound was coming from the headphones... thought it was coming from the speaker on the computer. will that damage the headphones?

ipaqman

Sorry to get in on this so late...was looking up a different stat on shure earbuds and came across this. You certainly didn't damage the earbuds, I have a pair of e3's and the audio beating they'll take is extreme. When the other people discuss spl at 1mW you have to realize that's 119 decibels of sound pressure level / per megawatt. That division symbol is important to recognize, it means that per 1000 watts your earbuds will put out 119 decibels of pressure (essentially). Which would blow your eardrums...You will never see that kind of pressure (it will also blow the earbuds). Your Ipod touch puts out a couple of watts (3-5) max, so take 3 divided by 1000 = .003 x 119 = .357spl at your ear. That may not seem like much, but your eardrum is plugged by the earphone in a tiny environment (your eardrum)...its enough to make you feel the bass. The reason they bring the rating up to 1mw is because they have to set it against the scale of current speakers on the market (those you would listen to in a room where pressure is dissipated). They use a generic rating for musical equipment.

All that information simply translates to the fact that your earphones are very good at receiving a signal and processing it into a quality sound with minimal interference.

So no the earbuds aren't damaged...The other thing is that the pressure from them will never instantly damage your ears so long as your playing it from a low power source like your ipod, even a higher power source like your computer (15 watts most) would still never do it.

primerahp
Nov 7, 2007, 06:20 AM
Once one of my friends put the full volume in my itouch with the supplied apple ear phones for about minute or two.After that it started giving some disturbing noice when I play some songs with higher bass. I called Apple company in japan and complained abt the ear phones and got a replacement in a day & thats a nother story. So, I recommend not to use ur Itouch in full volume, if u really care about your device.

Sesshi
Nov 7, 2007, 06:48 AM
Sorry to get in on this so late...was looking up a different stat on shure earbuds and came across this. You certainly didn't damage the earbuds, I have a pair of e3's and the audio beating they'll take is extreme. When the other people discuss spl at 1mW you have to realize that's 119 decibels of sound pressure level / per megawatt. That division symbol is important to recognize, it means that per 1000 watts your earbuds will put out 119 decibels of pressure (essentially). Which would blow your eardrums...You will never see that kind of pressure (it will also blow the earbuds). Your Ipod touch puts out a couple of watts (3-5) max, so take 3 divided by 1000 = .003 x 119 = .357spl at your ear. That may not seem like much, but your eardrum is plugged by the earphone in a tiny environment (your eardrum)...its enough to make you feel the bass. The reason they bring the rating up to 1mw is because they have to set it against the scale of current speakers on the market (those you would listen to in a room where pressure is dissipated). They use a generic rating for musical equipment.

All that information simply translates to the fact that your earphones are very good at receiving a signal and processing it into a quality sound with minimal interference.

So no the earbuds aren't damaged...The other thing is that the pressure from them will never instantly damage your ears so long as your playing it from a low power source like your ipod, even a higher power source like your computer (15 watts most) would still never do it.

Complete BS I'm afraid.

mw = milliwatt, not megawatt - that's 1/1000th of a Watt.

The lowest-rated phones - very small / efficient earphones with presumably weak coils - have a power handling capability of around 50mw per channel. DJ-style phones have a power handling capability which ranges into a couple of watts (>2000mw). Most iPods have an output of around 30mw per channel at peak or lower. The Macbook Pro can definitely go well beyond this.

I don't see power handling specs for the E500, but I don't think there has been damage. But it is possible bearing in mind the relatively low power handling capability of some balanced-armature phones. If you hear distortion - or should I say more distortion that you would normally expect on a pair of balanced-armature phones - then it is possible that there has been damage to the armature or the diaphragm.