PDA

View Full Version : Should Gizmodo be banned from Macworld?


Padraig
Jan 10, 2008, 03:12 PM
Bloggers often struggle to gain acceptance as a valid and legitimate source of news, and with this stunt (see link) Gizmodo have helped to undermine those who have worked so hard to gain credibility within an elitist industry.

I'm not without a sense of humour, but when Giz started screwing with a live presentation they crossed a line. This type of behaviour shouldn't be condoned in my opinion and a strong signal should be sent out to those responsible. Who's to say that they wouldn't interfere with an Apple event? What do you make of their actions?

http://gizmodo.com/343348/confessions-the-meanest-thing-gizmodo-did-at-ces

sk8mash
Jan 10, 2008, 03:21 PM
Thats childish, immature and thoughtless, ok shutting down a tv wall is funny, but ****ing with a live presentation? How much effort went into that guys presentation, and then he goes a mucks it up. Thats not funny. I say ban them from mac world, and any other media event.

phil83
Jan 10, 2008, 03:23 PM
I agree that was pretty stupid thing to do, maybe at home for fun, but not a the worlds largest electronic trade show.

Chris204
Jan 10, 2008, 03:38 PM
I bet they won't be getting press passes again next year to CES.

RoboCop001
Jan 10, 2008, 03:53 PM
Worse than lame.

Where does Gizmodo operate from? I'm going to pay them a visit and turn their monitors off. If you can't tell that's a metaphor for kicking them in the shins and then the face.

And then maybe if there's enough time, I'll force them to watch Dark Planet or that episode of Battlestar Galactica 1980 where the kids go up in a tree and turn invisible and start throwing apples at the people down below and they have those ridiculous viper bikes.

Anyone remember Tek Wars? What a show!

thesdx
Jan 10, 2008, 03:53 PM
That was just plain stupid. Nice way to ruin your career, Gizmodo. No Macworld for you. (I hope)

notjustjay
Jan 10, 2008, 03:58 PM
I've made presentations and I have felt the rush of panicked adrenaline and beads of sweat when my equipment doesn't work exactly as expected or rehearsed. If someone did that to me during a presentation, especially at one so public, I would be VERY angry.

This reflects very, VERY badly on their professionalism. I watched the video. The first few screens that went off was funny and subversive. The rest was just sickening to watch, literally watching a childish prank go on way too far. The fact that we saw repeating shots of the same walls going off (the big wall, the gaming station) suggests that whoever did this went back and did it OVER AND OVER AGAIN.

I did this once at school, but only once, and I was 14 at the time. How old are these guys?!

Gizmodo's press passes should be revoked permanently. There are already enough gadget-tech-blogs out there, I won't miss them.

esaleris
Jan 10, 2008, 03:59 PM
I think in a world where you only get 2-3 seconds of a consumer's time as they walk by, the mental snapshot of folks turning over panels to "fix" them, regardless of what is actually wrong, is quite strong. Link that with a brand name, and you've made an indelible, if subtle, connection.

dukebound85
Jan 10, 2008, 04:00 PM
banned forever i say

zelmo
Jan 10, 2008, 04:01 PM
That childish prank is close to the kind of thing that Woz pulled in college, so I can appreciate the humor on one level. The problem is that this was done at a trade show and is completely unacceptable behavior for any group passing themselves off as professional journalists or industry bloggers who wish to be taken seriously.

If I were CES management, I'd ban them for life. Can't imagine Apple will let them anywhere near Moscone.

yellow
Jan 10, 2008, 04:07 PM
Kind of like using a MBP Front Row Remote at an Apple Conf and switching people's displays to Front Row?

Killyp
Jan 10, 2008, 04:09 PM
The first few times was mildly amusing, but to do it multiple times is just stupid...

That looks really bad. I honestly though Gizmodo were professional reporters, but evidently not.

Osarkon
Jan 10, 2008, 04:09 PM
Whilst hilarious for the first few times, it did go on way too far.

And they shouldn't have done it to live presentations, that's just plain evil.

I also hope they're not allowed to Macworld. Even if they have matured up, banning them from it this year will ensure that they don't misbehave the next time.

eric55lv
Jan 10, 2008, 04:23 PM
banned forever i say

yeah from any electrocis trade show and expo

LoneWolf121188
Jan 10, 2008, 04:29 PM
Whilst hilarious for the first few times, it did go on way too far.

And they shouldn't have done it to live presentations, that's just plain evil.

Agreed. The first time I was ROFLing. When they kept doing it though...idk. I think its fine during the live presentations, but just once. I'm glad they admitted it though, that makes it a lot better.

gusapple
Jan 10, 2008, 04:58 PM
I always have disliked Gizmodo's way of doing things. I almost got in trouble at work when one of the guys that sat across from me while I was watching the live feed of one of the confrences because they were saying very crude things. They are way un-preofessional. That's why I go to MacRumors Live for my feeds!

JSchwage
Jan 10, 2008, 05:02 PM
All I know is that if I were running Macworld, Gizmodo would be on my banned list.

zioxide
Jan 10, 2008, 05:04 PM
lol, shutting off dish network's wall of monitors was funny, but ****ing with the presentations was immature and stupid.

tdhurst
Jan 10, 2008, 05:10 PM
Wow...and the world wonders why the tech blogger crowd is having a hard time being taken seriously as journalists.

synth3tik
Jan 10, 2008, 05:17 PM
Thats something that should stay at the hackers convention. not CES and most definitely not MWSF.

emikshe
Jan 10, 2008, 05:20 PM
"In college, I built small TV jammers. I'd go to the one dorm that had a color TV, sit in the back, in the dark, and tune in my jammer. The screen got messed up, not totally but enough to bother everyone. Without any plan, a friend in the front row, who knew what was going on (I hope he did) whacked the TV. I instantly turned the jammer off and the TV worked fine."
- Woz

Source: http://www.woz.org/letters/pirates/24.html

Telp
Jan 10, 2008, 05:29 PM
Agreed that it was stupid, and may hurt credibility, but i still love reading gizmodo, and would not wish to see them banned from MW or the next CES. People do stupid things, if they do it again, ban them, but i say let them off the hook for this one.

Padraig
Jan 10, 2008, 05:41 PM
"In college, I built small TV jammers. I'd go to the one dorm that had a color TV, sit in the back, in the dark, and tune in my jammer. The screen got messed up, not totally but enough to bother everyone. Without any plan, a friend in the front row, who knew what was going on (I hope he did) whacked the TV. I instantly turned the jammer off and the TV worked fine."
- Woz

Source: http://www.woz.org/letters/pirates/24.html

A college kid messing with the dorm's tv is nothing more than an irritation. Gizmodo pranking around with CES is playing with fire, they'll be lucky if they don't end up in court. Not to mention the potential damage they did to the blogging community.

albusseverus
Jan 10, 2008, 05:41 PM
just goes to show, if your name is Think Secret and you have no corporate backing, Apple will hound you out of existence...

if you publish an unchecked story about the iPhone being delayed, causing a run on Apple's stock price...

or stuff up a trade show...

it's all just good fun... ??

it's hard to know the best way to treat this... ban them and give them MORE publicity? or boycott their site...

Kevin, can we have a negative Digg option... I want UnDigg

onicon
Jan 10, 2008, 06:39 PM
like emikshe quoted, woz and steve as well were screwing around a lot in their young days. they even made money from selling devices to phone for free. where are the voices crying for boycott of apple because the founding fathers were evil hackers, keeping poor at&t from making their living?

if you want to prevent people from screwing with you presentations on tvs, just disable the ir port (via the rs232 console/diagnostic software or by slapping a sticker over the ir port). securing you devices takes at most 2min per device. so let the companies learn from this and don't bash gizmodo like mad.

who would have complained if it was microsofts demo pcs that got hacked because of some security vounerability?

mpw
Jan 10, 2008, 06:39 PM
...I did this once at school, but only once, and I was 14 at the time...
Me too!:D

I took the remote that came with my first TV into town and turned the volume of every TV in one shop to maximum one night after close. I also once saw somebody switch a window display to 'Red Hot Dutch' over night, there was a huge crowd of drunk guys with kebabs leering in from the street.:D

joegomolski
Jan 10, 2008, 06:48 PM
Sometimes I think, have a thought that is way out there, and I chuckle because it would be really bad to do it. Funny, HA HA, at someone's else's expensive.

But I don't do it.

thejadedmonkey
Jan 10, 2008, 06:59 PM
who would have complained if it was microsofts demo pcs that got hacked because of some security vounerability?

The same people who are complaining now, if it was by a known hacker who supposedly worked for the good of everything.

asphalt-proof
Jan 10, 2008, 07:09 PM
I go to Gizmodo's site regularly and saw where they had admitted to their prank. I really didn't think much of it and even thought it was funny. However, i never read past the headlines so i didn't know they screwed with someone's presentation. That's just bad form and extremely inconsiderate. These presentors put a lot of time and energy preparing for that 10 miinutes or so that they have to spotlight. Yes, some are very lame, stupid, whatever. But for the most part, these people work very hard to do the best job they can. Not to mention that their job may be put in jeopardy if their presentation tanks.

I imagine that the Gizmodo staff were seriously CES-fatigued, over-stimulated by the flashy lights and loud, continuous noise, and slightly drunk. Fine. Most of the other bloggers were in the same state of mind. But none of them (at least as far as we know) didn't ******* with someone's presentation. I think they should be banned from CES next year as a punishment. Macworld? Not so much. It didn't happen there. Well, it didn't happen there. But I think that Apple would very carefully interview Gizmodo before giving them a press pass then make them sweat. Maybe even frisk them in public, before they entered the convention center. THat would make a lot of bloggers and vendors smile. Really make them sweat. But let them in anyways. Gizmodo is a very popular tech blog and for the most part, a very well done blog. Their coverage is important to Macworld. This way, Apple can ensure they get coverage but also get some karma points from other bloggers and vendors when they see how Apple deals with Gizmodo.

GoCubsGo
Jan 10, 2008, 07:24 PM
Should they be banned? Yes.

asphalt-proof
Jan 10, 2008, 07:34 PM
I started to think more about this and I think they are going to get punished where it will really hurt: Ad revenue and sample products to review. If i was a vendor, there is no way I would send something to them to review would i advertize on their site. Especially if I were Motorola. I wouldn't be surprised if Gizmodo is shuttered in a month or so. Let them come to Macworld... it will probably be the last conference they ever cover.

jsw
Jan 10, 2008, 08:02 PM
I agree it was immature.

Still, it probably will lead vendors to 'secure' their sets in the future, and the fact that it was so obnoxious and obvious means it's very unlikely this sort of vulnerability will present itself next year.

bennyboi
Jan 10, 2008, 08:31 PM
Wow- imagine if someone had the button pressing capability of shifting to Steve's next slide during his keynote. He's building suspense, toying with us, and bam. Revealed. On to next slide, hold, next slide, finally A/V guy turns projector off.
No SDK for you! 1 year!

Stella
Jan 10, 2008, 09:24 PM
Sad.

Very immature.

dukebound85
Jan 10, 2008, 09:35 PM
Wow- imagine if someone had the button pressing capability of shifting to Steve's next slide during his keynote. He's building suspense, toying with us, and bam. Revealed. On to next slide, hold, next slide, finally A/V guy turns projector off.
No SDK for you! 1 year!

i would be a tad upset

forrestmc4
Jan 10, 2008, 10:09 PM
I'm a regular reader of Gizmodo and their "rival" Engadget. I have to say after this stunt I don't have much respect left for Giz. A presentation, particularly a press presentation, is a key part of CES marketing for some of the biggest names around. Messing with the Motorola presentation was way, way, way over the line. Sadly, the comments on the story seem to show a rift in the Gizmodo readership trending towards acceptance of this unbelievably unprofessional conduct. There were even commenters faulting companies for leaving IR receivers uncovered by electrical tape or some other rudimentary signal blocking fix. Companies shouldn't have to shelter their product presentations from this kind of childishness, journalistic professionalism should take care of that.

Shame on Gizmodo. Bring out the banhammer.

Lunettes
Jan 10, 2008, 10:29 PM
Hope they don't shut down Steve's screen at the keynote...

LoneWolf121188
Jan 10, 2008, 10:50 PM
Wow- imagine if someone had the button pressing capability of shifting to Steve's next slide during his keynote. He's building suspense, toying with us, and bam. Revealed. On to next slide, hold, next slide, finally A/V guy turns projector off.
No SDK for you! 1 year!
Hahaha, that would be hilarious! C'mon guys, seriously. No harm done.

BTW, in your sig: its spelled "psyche", not "sike". ;) But yeah, I did a double-take at that. :D

fr33 loader
Jan 10, 2008, 11:01 PM
Hahaha, that would be hilarious! C'mon guys, seriously. No harm done.

Unless you are the one standing and giving the presentation. The wasted manpower to fix it. Money to use the stage for certain alloted time. Negative effect on brand name thinking it was a real malfunction on the TV set. All of this to gain what?:(

solvs
Jan 10, 2008, 11:45 PM
All of this to gain what?:(
Attention. Or to make a lame joke that went way too far. I would be more shocked if they weren't banned from CES, and probably others. I doubt they'll get banned from Macworld this late in the game, especially after having come clean instead of someone else finding out and outing them, but they'll probably be watched more. Anything goes wrong, they'll be the first to be blamed, even if it's just a copycat. I wouldn't be surprised to find those affected not wanting to advertise anytime soon either, nor sending them products for awhile. Free advertising or not. Businesses aren't really known to have senses of humors about such things. A prank is a prank, but this is big business here and they're supposed to be professionals. There goes any credibility they had left.

They may not get any punishment for it, but if they want to make sure something similar (or worse) doesn't happen again, I'm sure they'll be more careful, but I'm also thinking those affected might want to make an example of the pranksters and the site.

marks47
Jan 11, 2008, 04:17 PM
I have a problem with tv-b-gone users in general.
That said, I was laughing at the video.
Some people have screamed "sue!"
You have to be able to PROVE damages.

As for causing the companies damages, remember these guys probably screwed up about 2 minutes worth of each presentation they messed with... We just happened to see it repeatedly, and non-stop. Don't forget those presentations are made every 5-10 minutes every day for 3-4 days... In the grand scheme of things, I have a hard time believing anyone was *really* damaged.

That said, I'm going to be manning our booth at Macworld next week. I'm disabling the IR receivers so nobody comes by with an Apple remote, trying to trigger front row on all our laptops!! :)

Irishman
Jan 11, 2008, 04:43 PM
Quite childish behavior, I agree.

madmaxmedia
Jan 11, 2008, 04:53 PM
Doing it during somebody's presentation is just plain cold.

I heard that the Gizmodo people pushed all the buttons in the elevators too.

voicegy
Jan 11, 2008, 05:08 PM
if you want to prevent people from screwing with you presentations on tvs, just disable the ir port (via the rs232 console/diagnostic software or by slapping a sticker over the ir port). securing you devices takes at most 2min per device. so let the companies learn from this and don't bash gizmodo like mad.

And, pray tell, what other completely unnecessary "precautions" should the companies take to insure that snot-nosed jackasses (who are stupid to the point of even ADMITTING their lame stunt on their own web site) not screw around with their presentation walls and equipment? Security dogs next to power switches? Locks on power strips? Bits of tape over every ir port on every device they show? Oh, yes, the big dork-off companies should learn their lesson against such obvious security risks. The same companies that invest sweat, blood, money and tears to bring us the gadgets we love to have.

It's not even as if these bone-heads went out and invented some magic solder-based toy in their garage and showed the world how uber-geek they could be; for that, I MIGHT consider a prop in their direction IF they kept the mischief down to one or two non-presentation instances. They simply used a stupid TV-B-Gone that can be had by any moron for 20 bucks.

Way to go, GizLamo. That was as funny as letting the air out of a tire of your neighbor and giggling from the front window watching him worry about being late for work. A laff-riot if you're 12 and developmentally disabled. Hardy-har-har.:mad:

aswitcher
Jan 11, 2008, 05:08 PM
Yeah, it was disappointing. Doing it to one booth and then making clear it was them not a fault I would have chuckled at. But the whole place and during peoples presentations. Good luck getting sponsorship and interviews now. Shame, I like Gizmodos stuff.

jlanuez
Jan 11, 2008, 05:11 PM
Without question, banned from CES.

It costs companies a small fortune to attend and display at a show like this, would not be surprised if someone brought a suit against them.

Totally unprofessional and unacceptable!

sanford
Jan 11, 2008, 06:27 PM
Bloggers often struggle to gain acceptance as a valid and legitimate source of news, and with this stunt (see link) Gizmodo have helped to undermine those who have worked so hard to gain credibility within an elitist industry.

I'm not without a sense of humour, but when Giz started screwing with a live presentation they crossed a line. This type of behaviour shouldn't be condoned in my opinion and a strong signal should be sent out to those responsible. Who's to say that they wouldn't interfere with an Apple event? What do you make of their actions?

http://gizmodo.com/343348/confessions-the-meanest-thing-gizmodo-did-at-ces


Games and gadgets, the concept of the fourth estate is a joke. Gadgets, it's primarily the online media. Games, it's both print and online, in general tone and especially in game reviews.

A goofball walks into CES and does this, it's a practical joke, and he faces his own personal consequences. Find it funny or not, it's your own personal taste. Guys wearing press badges do this, anyone actively involved, they should all be fired by the parent company. Immediately. Period. No second chances. But Nick Denton is so afraid of not appearing cool and hip, he suborns what he probably thinks, or tells himself, is "gonzo" journalism, but it's really just a complete lack of respect for the profession; and he also panders to so-called "futurist" rhetoric as spouted by numerous thirty-year-old "cultural visionaries" with not so much as an undergrad degree in elementary education to their names.

Not to mention that what they did is probably some state or federal higher-end misdemeanor; that is, a criminal act for which they could serve jail time.

And no, I'm not a stiff or a prude: I love practical jokes. But members of the press *do not* interfere with events they are covering in their official capacities, while checked in under press credentials of all things. If Denton doesn't formerly apologize to the CES coordinators and the individual exhibitors affected, and then fire each member of his staff involved, he should not retain a single shred of public or industry credibility. Advertisers should boycott, and he should be put out of business, his whole operation.

sanford
Jan 11, 2008, 06:31 PM
I have a problem with tv-b-gone users in general.
That said, I was laughing at the video.
Some people have screamed "sue!"
You have to be able to PROVE damages.

Not true, Marks. You have to prove damages to be awarded damages -- well, for the most part. But not merely to sue. To get a suit filed and avoid a summary dismissal, the civil standard is very easy to meet. To use a suit, or suits, to bankrupt Gawker Media in defending the suits, without ever being awarded actual damages, very possible, and an excellent corporate legal strategy.

Project
Jan 11, 2008, 06:37 PM
The chances of Gizmodo being invited back to CES as press are remote to say the least. Thats a LOT of lost page impressions next year.

Heads will roll.

jackc
Jan 11, 2008, 06:41 PM
Someone should have got their asses kicked

Fossie
Jan 11, 2008, 06:53 PM
I think people should just get over it. Although doing it while he was doing the talk was a little :mad:

voicegy
Jan 11, 2008, 07:03 PM
I think people should just get over it. Although doing it while he was doing the talk was a little :mad:

Well, eventually people WILL get over it, but for the moment, it's a hot topic.

Over at Gizmodo's own site, the comment list on the story has reached 674 comments, 2 of which are my own. It's just about the most comments I remember seeing on a Giz story:

http://tinyurl.com/3eyy4c

I am once again feeling proud to be a MacRumors member - the comments HERE have been interesting, civil, and quite readable - even comments that I would disagree with. It's a madhouse over at Giz.:eek:

MrSmith
Jan 11, 2008, 07:13 PM
I think the "hilarious" part must have slipped me by. :confused:

David G.
Jan 11, 2008, 07:19 PM
Ban. Them. Now.

wyatt23
Jan 11, 2008, 07:25 PM
I think the "hilarious" part must have slipped me by. :confused:

not me. the video was sooo hilarious. CES = the most prominent electronics show in the world with the MOST HIGH TECH tech you can find. and they allow for a 14.99 POS hack to ruin almost every booth.

HILARIOUS. i actually laughed out loud almost the whole video. childish yes. hilarious yes.

eye opening? yes. next year you can imagine there will be a few more companies that disable IR ports in public displays.

should gizmodo be allowed at macworld? YES. you think apple is stupid enough to allow something like that to happen? no.

as for gizmodo coming clean. i think that's fine. it was so funny. plus i'm sure not everyone endorsed the prank. it was probably a few people and then they made a blog post.

quit complaining. people are twisting their panties over nothing.

retorts: blah blah blah... presentation. blah blah blah.

sanford
Jan 11, 2008, 08:50 PM
not me. the video was sooo hilarious. CES = the most prominent electronics show in the world with the MOST HIGH TECH tech you can find. and they allow for a 14.99 POS hack to ruin almost every booth.

HILARIOUS. i actually laughed out loud almost the whole video. childish yes. hilarious yes.

eye opening? yes. next year you can imagine there will be a few more companies that disable IR ports in public displays.


I'm sure you're not a journalism professional. I don't think the point of this should be whether it was funny or not. Fine, you found it funny, others didn't, that's the nature of jokes. The point is: the press observes. One cannot observe something without influencing it or changing it in some, at least, small way. But it is not the business of the press *to set about to* change or influence that which they observe.

MrSmith
Jan 11, 2008, 09:08 PM
...But it is not the business of the press *to set about to* change or influence that which they observe.
Especially not in politics. Oh, no.

TC2COOL
Jan 11, 2008, 10:00 PM
Everyone is making comments that suggest that the Gizmodo guys are professionals and have broken some code of ethics.

They are BLOGGERS. There are no rules in blogging. There are no codes of ethics.

Sure they were over the top, but that drove traffic to their site. The only thing they are worried about is traffic to the site, that is how they make money.

Should they be banned? Why? It's not like they are journalists.

NAG
Jan 11, 2008, 10:10 PM
I thought it was funny. Were they being annoying and disruptive? Yes. Are they going to have a harder time getting in the various expos and conferences? Probably. I'm not going to demand they get banned for pulling a prank. This isn't shocking either. I mean, do people actually take gizmodo seriously? They fabricate rumors and post stuff that isn't exactly safe for work. People expecting them to act like journalists are kind of fooling themselves.

Luis
Jan 11, 2008, 10:17 PM
I still like Engadget better. And after this, It'll probably be only Engadget that I continue to read.

aross99
Jan 11, 2008, 10:32 PM
At first, I got a chuckle when I read this on their site. Turning off a wall of display is one thing, but what they did to the presenters (especially Motorolla) is inexcusable. They took it way to far...

To be honest with you, I can't believe they blogged about it afterwards..

NAG
Jan 11, 2008, 10:42 PM
Before they posted the video they basically had a big post explaining why CES sucks and should go away. So I can believe it completely.

geocom
Jan 11, 2008, 11:53 PM
I would not see a problem with them going to report at macworld if anything happens in the keynote Steve would recover like he did at last years Mac World where his clicker stopped working and you are also talking about a mac event unlike CES things don't crash :)

lukenorris
Jan 11, 2008, 11:53 PM
I wonder if this device turns off movie projectors?

LUKE

NAG
Jan 11, 2008, 11:55 PM
I would not see a problem with them going to report at macworld if anything happens in the keynote Steve would recover like he did at last years Mac World where his clicker stopped working and you are also talking about a mac event unlike CES things don't crash :)

Actually he had a build of 10.5 crash on him when they first showed it off and he also had that camera incident (which was overblown).

zioxide
Jan 12, 2008, 12:57 AM
Everyone is making comments that suggest that the Gizmodo guys are professionals and have broken some code of ethics.

They are BLOGGERS. There are no rules in blogging. There are no codes of ethics.

Sure they were over the top, but that drove traffic to their site. The only thing they are worried about is traffic to the site, that is how they make money.

Should they be banned? Why? It's not like they are journalists.

They were there with a press pass.

Anyways, according to a story that just went to the digg frontpage, the Gizmodo employee who did it has been banned from future CES events and they're still discussing actions against Gizmodo and Gawker media.

I say ban them. That was retarded. Companies pay tons of money for these shows trying to get them to go off without a hitch. Having displays randomly turning off is bad for them. It could cost them millions of dollars and could have even cost the people who set everything up their jobs.

Additionally, there's still a debate about whether bloggers are journalists... personally I'd say they are. But some idiots doing this just gives a bad name to bloggers everywhere.

I hope their whole company is banned from CES and other events so that they go out of business.

wyatt23
Jan 12, 2008, 01:35 AM
I'm sure you're not a journalism professional. I don't think the point of this should be whether it was funny or not. Fine, you found it funny, others didn't, that's the nature of jokes. The point is: the press observes. One cannot observe something without influencing it or changing it in some, at least, small way. But it is not the business of the press *to set about to* change or influence that which they observe.

i'm not a journalism professional, i'm an electrical engineer major (about to graduate). something like this is funny. yes it's disruptive. did it cost millions to companies? doubtful. Perhaps security should be better. Allowing a few people to easily ruin presentations and shut down walls of displays is an absurd thought. that shouldn't be able to happen at an event of this size. perhaps, a company should be aware of cheap hacks that can foil their displays. it was stated on this thread the rs-232 ports are designed for features like this. use em.

ban the individual jerk(s) that did this. not the whole blog.

sonictonic
Jan 12, 2008, 01:45 AM
I'm not at all a fan of that site. I'm all for them being banned. They're childish people who are so rarely professional I often wonder how they got to where they are. It's a crappy site, IMO.

Much Ado
Jan 12, 2008, 03:46 AM
They are BLOGGERS. There are no rules in blogging. There are no codes of ethics.

As soon as you start advertising on your blog and maintain a healthy stream for revenue from hits, you become more than just a blog. They owe it to themselves to be professional for the sake of their reputations, and they just screwed that up royally.

dalvin200
Jan 12, 2008, 03:53 AM
Damn... that pretty much sucked for the Moto presentation..
made the company look like a fool.. :eek:

wonder what the outcome of this will be....

and such a small apology on the giz article...

as for banning from macworld - well, the guy who actually pulled the trigger on the tv remote thingy should get banned for real!

109%
Jan 12, 2008, 04:03 AM
What are they, 12? I thought that was disgraceful. But then again, I hate all practical jokes. There's no wit or elegance involved in any of them. I've never heard of one that wasn't the equivalent of telling someone their house had burned down with their family inside before slapping them on the back and saying, "Just kidding!"

"I love practical jokes" is just another way of saying "I don't have the intelligence or sophistication to appreciate genuine humour, but I know how to hurt people".

Morons.

solvs
Jan 12, 2008, 04:14 AM
Everyone is making comments that suggest that the Gizmodo guys are professionals and have broken some code of ethics.
They were there as professionals at a professional event, and as said, given press passes. They presented themselves as professionals, and wouldn't have gotten in for free and to the presentations had they not. Even worse, they bring the rest of the community down with them. Some bloggers actually fight hard to try and be taken seriously. Stuff like this just makes it harder for them. And since they're making money by covering this, they may get a small bump in the short term, but it could hurt them down the line when companies decide they aren't worth doing business with.

Statement from the CEA (http://www.news.com/8301-10784_3-9849168-7.html?tag=nefd.only):

We have been informed of inappropriate behavior on the show floor by a credentialed media attendee from the Web site Gizmodo, owned by Gawker Media. Specifically, the Gizmodo staffer interfered with the exhibitor booth operations of numerous companies, including disrupting at least one press event. The Gizmodo staffer violated the terms of CES media credentials and caused harm to CES exhibitors. This Gizmodo staffer has been identified and will be barred from attending any future CES events. Additional sanctions against Gizmodo and Gawker Media are under discussion.
It's not quite as funny when there are consequences.

voicegy
Jan 12, 2008, 01:14 PM
Statement from the CEA (http://www.news.com/8301-10784_3-9849168-7.html?tag=nefd.only):


It's not quite as funny when there are consequences.

Indeed. Excellent - this is just the action I would have expected and I'm glad to see it happen.:)

Reach
Jan 12, 2008, 02:03 PM
Just stupid.. I sure wouldn't invite them to my expo, but kids will be kids I guess..

themadchemist
Jan 12, 2008, 02:12 PM
OK, this is funny. Yes, mean, but funny.

fastbite
Jan 12, 2008, 02:19 PM
Giz are just a bunch of prats. They want to play like a punk outfit fine, make music then and forget reporting tech stuff. grow up and buy a shaver.

hugodrax
Jan 12, 2008, 03:04 PM
Bloggers are not professionals anyways.

Flowbee
Jan 12, 2008, 03:05 PM
not me. the video was sooo hilarious. CES = the most prominent electronics show in the world with the MOST HIGH TECH tech you can find. and they allow for a 14.99 POS hack to ruin almost every booth.


And I could have ruined every booth with a $1.99 slingshot and a pocket full of small stones.

You can't demonstrate tech products in an open environment while at the same time disabling their features and ensuring that nobody will tamper with them. How do you let people try out your new TV if you've had to disable the IR?

If pranks like these become more common, companies and trade shows will start to put severe restrictions on who's allowed to attend their events. And that's a bad thing. It's pretty safe to say that Gizmodo, Engadget, and all the other tech blogs would continue to cover CES product announcements whether they're invited to the event or not, so the big manufacturers don't have much to lose by the blogs not being there.

NAG
Jan 12, 2008, 03:08 PM
Equating destruction of physical property to turning off tv sets is a stretch. Such hyperbole just makes more of the drama that they want. Why do you think they did this? They're attention whores.

Flowbee
Jan 12, 2008, 03:52 PM
Equating destruction of physical property to turning off tv sets is a stretch.

Obviously.:rolleyes: I was responding to the idea that is was somehow ironic (and funny) that such a low-tech device could disrupt such a high-tech show. There are many other low-tech ways to cause problems for exhibitors. You can't have an open, accessible show floor and protect against everyone's idea of a "prank." Exhibitors have to be able to trust that attendees, especially press credentialed attendees, won't make them look foolish in order to drive traffic to their blogs.

Anyway, I hope you took notice of the real point of my comment:
If pranks like these become more common, companies and trade shows will start to put severe restrictions on who's allowed to attend their events.

That's nothing to laugh about.

t0mat0
Jan 12, 2008, 04:03 PM
Gizmodo snip What do you make of their actions?
http://gizmodo.com/343348/confessions-the-meanest-thing-gizmodo-did-at-ces

/. gizmodo ftw & ***** and giggles

NAG
Jan 12, 2008, 04:34 PM
Obviously.:rolleyes: I was responding to the idea that is was somehow ironic (and funny) that such a low-tech device could disrupt such a high-tech show. There are many other low-tech ways to cause problems for exhibitors. You can't have an open, accessible show floor and protect against everyone's idea of a "prank." Exhibitors have to be able to trust that attendees, especially press credentialed attendees, won't make them look foolish in order to drive traffic to their blogs.

Anyway, I hope you took notice of the real point of my comment:


That's nothing to laugh about.

Yes, and disagreeing with President Bush means you support the Terrorists. Yes, I just went there.

Seriously, that is such a slippery slope argument it isn't funny. Blaming some pranksters for the end of big expos is silly.

tdhurst
Jan 12, 2008, 05:28 PM
Obviously.:rolleyes: I was responding to the idea that is was somehow ironic (and funny) that such a low-tech device could disrupt such a high-tech show. There are many other low-tech ways to cause problems for exhibitors. You can't have an open, accessible show floor and protect against everyone's idea of a "prank." Exhibitors have to be able to trust that attendees, especially press credentialed attendees, won't make them look foolish in order to drive traffic to their blogs.

Anyway, I hope you took notice of the real point of my comment:


That's nothing to laugh about.

This is more about the prank being done by a Gizmodo employee than the prank itself. If some Joe Blow attendee had done this, the blowback wouldn't have been as bad.

Credentialed people are held to a higher standard. They are trusted to cover the event, not affect the outcome of it. Any blogger or press member should be embarrassed by this kind of behavior. As a writer and an event planner, I'm pissed in every way imaginable.

NAG
Jan 12, 2008, 05:32 PM
I still don't get the blogger pulls a prank equating to all bloggers everywhere being punished by conference organizers. Seriously, it sounds all Zod evil where they threaten to kill some random guy if Superman doesn't bow down to them.

gwangung
Jan 12, 2008, 05:57 PM
I still don't get the blogger pulls a prank equating to all bloggers everywhere being punished by conference organizers. Seriously, it sounds all Zod evil where they threaten to kill some random guy if Superman doesn't bow down to them.

Seriously, you DON'T????

I can certainly see that. I'd be doing that if I were running a conference.

NAG
Jan 12, 2008, 05:59 PM
You do realize that Zod lost every time, right? :p

NDA74
Jan 12, 2008, 07:14 PM
Credentialed people are held to a higher standard. They are trusted to cover the event, not affect the outcome of it. Any blogger or press member should be embarrassed by this kind of behavior. As a writer and an event planner, I'm pissed in every way imaginable.

Agreed. People have argued that bloggers should not be credentialed for trade shows and sporting events because they might disrupt the event. Gizmodo's stunt adds credibility to those arguments.

I used to read Gizmodo regularly, but I deleted the RSS feed from NetNewsWire Friday.

NAG
Jan 12, 2008, 07:20 PM
Anyone who leaps to a conclusion over this is foolish and shooting themselves in the foot. Print media is dead in its current form so you'll never see events banning people just because they have an online presence. Crucifying gizmodo for being the morons they are while claiming they're hurting other journalists is disingenuous. Do you really think conferences don't want any press to go to their events? The big conferences are under threat (E3 is a good example). I doubt they'd do anything horribly stupid over this. Ban gizmodo? Yeah, can see that. Require that you can only get in if you have a newspaper or magazine? Doubt it.

tdhurst
Jan 12, 2008, 07:35 PM
Anyone who leaps to a conclusion over this is foolish and shooting themselves in the foot. Print media is dead in its current form so you'll never see events banning people just because they have an online presence. Crucifying gizmodo for being the morons they are while claiming they're hurting other journalists is disingenuous. Do you really think conferences don't want any press to go to their events? The big conferences are under threat (E3 is a good example). I doubt they'd do anything horribly stupid over this. Ban gizmodo? Yeah, can see that. Require that you can only get in if you have a newspaper or magazine? Doubt it.

The issue here is that bloggers and online journalists are still a fairly new medium and haven't been fully accepted yet. This would happen with any sort of group that didn't have a history.

I would bet that no print media journalist would ever pull crap like this. He/she would have been fired on the spot and the publication itself would have issued a real apology, not post a video online and issue a half-hearted apology to one group.

NAG
Jan 12, 2008, 07:43 PM
The issue here is that bloggers and online journalists are still a fairly new medium and haven't been fully accepted yet. This would happen with any sort of group that didn't have a history.

I would bet that no print media journalist would ever pull crap like this, either. He/she would have been fired on the spot and the publication itself would have issued a real apology, not post a video online and issue a half-hearted apology to one group.

Whoa. You honestly think that there isn't anyone in the print media that pulled stuff like that? You haven't read a lot of the more satirical magazines.

And by saying "haven't been fully accepted yet" you really mean "the big print media guys are still in their transition." They all know print is basically dead, they've been trying to transition for years. Some morons with a blog turning off tvs at a tech conference are not going to stop this transition. If anything it will lead to conferences learning how to properly vet online media like they do with print media.

Loalq
Jan 12, 2008, 07:45 PM
It is a shame...so difficult to create a reputation as a blogger then they do this...

If one headless guy chose to do that, then it was GIZMODOs responsability to deal with him, not to endorse him by exposing this stupidity on their site.

This is news media after all, not the Borat show.

_bnkr612
Jan 12, 2008, 07:56 PM
It could have been worse. What if they streamed content from the other part of CES (i.e., XXX).

That would be bad...

tdhurst
Jan 12, 2008, 08:04 PM
Whoa. You honestly think that there isn't anyone in the print media that pulled stuff like that? You haven't read a lot of the more satirical magazines.

And by saying "haven't been fully accepted yet" you really mean "the big print media guys are still in their transition." They all know print is basically dead, they've been trying to transition for years. Some morons with a blog turning off tvs at a tech conference are not going to stop this transition. If anything it will lead to conferences learning how to properly vet online media like they do with print media.

Give me an example of a prank pulled of this magnitude at this large of a show by someone in the print media that was not immediately fired, please.

And I do agree with your point about the transition and that all media need to be vetted to attend events.

NAG
Jan 12, 2008, 08:40 PM
Thats a loaded demand since you already agreed with my later statement that they need to learn how to vet online sources like they do print sources. I can list off any number of magazines or whatnot that would do such things if given the chance, though. It isn't like gizmodo invented pranking, guys.

NDA74
Jan 12, 2008, 09:01 PM
Anyone who leaps to a conclusion over this is foolish and shooting themselves in the foot. Print media is dead in its current form so you'll never see events banning people just because they have an online presence.

No, you will not. But what you will see are event planners being much more selective about who they credential, until the only media you see at events are the same big media companies that have always been there, except now they're online instead of in print. Same monopolies, different medium.

NAG
Jan 12, 2008, 09:07 PM
So gizmodo is responsible for this how? Questioning what makes an online a journalist a journalist and not just a fan site has been going on for some time (aka: before gizmodo turned off a bunch of TVs). You're just scapegoating an easy target. If you have a problem with the conferences and expos limiting press to only a few big names go after that. Not after guys who like to prank people. You'll change nothing by attacking gizmodo.

tdhurst
Jan 12, 2008, 09:08 PM
Thats a loaded demand since you already agreed with my later statement that they need to learn how to vet online sources like they do print sources. I can list off any number of magazines or whatnot that would do such things if given the chance, though. It isn't like gizmodo invented pranking, guys.

If given a chance? What does that mean?

You think if Wired had done this they wouldn't have been banned?

NAG
Jan 12, 2008, 09:12 PM
If given a chance? What does that mean?

You think if Wired had done this they wouldn't have been banned?

See, loaded. You're warping what I'm saying so you can brush me off and continue to scapegoat gizmodo for something completely separate.

Think about this.

Did I ever say gizmodo probably wasn't going to get banned?

Did I actually say the opposite?

Did I bring up Wired anywhere in this thread or link them to various pranks?

Was I actually trying to make you look at the statement that implied blind faith in print media as being a bastion of truth and being isolated from such pranking?

tdhurst
Jan 12, 2008, 09:23 PM
See, loaded. You're warping what I'm saying so you can brush me off and continue to scapegoat gizmodo for something completely separate.

Think about this.

Did I ever say gizmodo probably wasn't going to get banned?

Did I actually say the opposite?

Did I bring up Wired anywhere in this thread or link them to various pranks?

Was I actually trying to make you look at the statement that implied blind faith in print media as being a bastion of truth and being isolated from such pranking?

Wait...how am I scapegoating Gizmodo? I was questioning your statement:

I can list off any number of magazines or whatnot that would do such things if given the chance, though. It isn't like gizmodo invented pranking, guys.

I was only using Wired as an example of print journalism.

tdhurst
Jan 12, 2008, 09:27 PM
So gizmodo is responsible for this how? Questioning what makes an online a journalist a journalist and not just a fan site has been going on for some time (aka: before gizmodo turned off a bunch of TVs). You're just scapegoating an easy target. If you have a problem with the conferences and expos limiting press to only a few big names go after that. Not after guys who like to prank people. You'll change nothing by attacking gizmodo.

I think what he is trying to say here is that we're all pissed at Gizmodo for possibly lending legitimacy to big media claims that online-only or blogger sites aren't real journalists, but rather fan sites. I'm not saying that everyone will think this, but the majority of the less-involved public could be swayed.

Pranks like this by Gizmodo just give them false credibility to their incorrect claims.

I would argue that many people lump all blogger sites into one group, neglecting to admit there are great differences from site to site. Right now, because these new players are not complete accepted yet, anything done by one has repercussions on everyone.

Flowbee
Jan 12, 2008, 10:40 PM
Yes
Seriously, that is such a slippery slope argument it isn't funny. Blaming some pranksters for the end of big expos is silly.

That's not what I was saying at all. It's hard to tell if you're actually reading the posts you're responding to.

solvs
Jan 12, 2008, 11:34 PM
Bloggers are not professionals anyways.
Some of them are trying to be, but as most of the rest of the posters here are trying to say, things like this just make it harder for them to be taken as such.

iTeen
Jan 12, 2008, 11:48 PM
yes, i would hate for steve to be in the middle of the keynote and Gizmodo screws something up, then i would hunt them down.
that was a very childish joke, but funny

ilflyya
Jan 12, 2008, 11:54 PM
This prank lacked class and seems to be a great way to lose credibility and access to other events. I've never seen someone shoot themselves in the foot like this. Am I now supposed to believe anything they have to say? How do I know what they put out isn't a prank?

NDA74
Jan 13, 2008, 09:12 AM
So gizmodo is responsible for this how?

Gizmodo is responsible for this because it vouched for the prankster and obtained a credential for him. Media organizations put their reputations at stake each time they obtain a credential for someone, whether it's to a high school basketball game, a trade show or a political event.

Cleverboy
Jan 13, 2008, 10:13 AM
Agreed that it was stupid, and may hurt credibility, but i still love reading gizmodo, and would not wish to see them banned from MW or the next CES. People do stupid things, if they do it again, ban them, but i say let them off the hook for this one.They did not emphatically apologize for poor judgement. Briam Lam himself says that the only thing he didn't approve was doing it during press conferences... but when the error has occurred, you need to apologize for the whole incident, not say, "Sorry, we only wanted to screw around with some people, not others." Vendors PAID MONEY to attend this event. Gizmodo willfully inteferered with press conferences, and hasn't editted the article to include anything resembling a wholesale apology. --Just, "Look at this COOL thing we did! Isn't it hilarious! You can do it too!"

Sorry, they bring anything on themselves to be so childish. I honestly went looking for why people were making more out of this than they should have. I read the CNET article and Brian Lam's casual response.

http://valleywag.com/343531/cnet-editor-proves-theres-no-difference-between-press-and-blogger
BY BRIAN LAM AT 01/10/08 06:04 PM
@OMG! Ponies!: @rafe: Relax. It was a joke. Just because we don't do things the way you do, I don't see why that is stupid. The site has proved its intelligence. Did you see that we got Bill Gates to cop to Vista not being so good today? The point is that if we do things the way you do them at CNet, we're CNet. If you do things the way Giz and Engadget do them, you're actually...Crave. (Which I like, and do not call stupid.) Why is this so emotionally disturbing to you both? Motorola, well that was a mistake, as my explicit orders to my video person were to not interrupt press conferences. But that is for me and Moto to sort out tomorrow.
So... "presentations", fair game, "press conferences"... avoid them... but "whoops" if we did. That's infuriatingly bad.

BAN THEM. My opinion. It would have been different had they owned up, but they're not... which means they're proud of it. No good.
Gizmodo is responsible for this because it vouched for the prankster and obtained a credential for him. Media organizations put their reputations at stake each time they obtain a credential for someone, whether it's to a high school basketball game, a trade show or a political event.Gizmodo WAS the prankster (http://gizmodo.com/343348/confessions-the-meanest-thing-gizmodo-did-at-ces). This wasn't a "rogue" guy. Just read their own description of it.
Confessions: The Meanest Thing Gizmodo Did at CES
CES has no shortage of displays. And when MAKE offered us some TV-B-Gone clickers to bring to the show, we pretty much couldn't help ourselves. We shut off a TV. And then another. And then a wall of TVs. And we just couldn't stop. (And Panasonic, you're so lucky that 150-incher didn't have an active IR port.) It was too much fun, but watching this video, we realize it probably made some people's jobs harder, and I don't agree with that (Especially Motorola). We're sorry. [Thanks to Phil Torrone for the gear, video, editing and mischief by Richard Blakeley]
"I don't agree with that". Just a very small, useless comment. It's like watching you're hand slap someone and then saying you "don't agree" with it. Sheesh.

It's not even as if the vendors didn't have "proper security" or something. This is just how technology WORKS. There's no real way around it except to actively block the IR receivers, which in many cases would be make organizing everything very difficult.

~ CB

windon
Jan 13, 2008, 02:54 PM
the Gizmorons should be banned as most of the replies have mentioned it was "high-school" - I was surprised to see the Cnet community go toward the "as long as I am having fun to hell with everyone else" camp and Proud as Ever to be a mac zealot, we know the credo "it's all fun until someone loses the signal"

NAG
Jan 13, 2008, 03:03 PM
Gizmodo is responsible for this because it vouched for the prankster and obtained a credential for him. Media organizations put their reputations at stake each time they obtain a credential for someone, whether it's to a high school basketball game, a trade show or a political event.

I can quote out of context too. But I won't, because I don't attack people who disagree with me.

Saying that Gizmodo's actions are going to hurt other online media is silly. It screams scapegoat. I know online media is trying to be taken seriously but viciously attacking each other instead of trying to come to a real solution doesn't help anyone.

PlaceofDis
Jan 13, 2008, 03:04 PM
That childish prank is close to the kind of thing that Woz pulled in college, so I can appreciate the humor on one level. The problem is that this was done at a trade show and is completely unacceptable behavior for any group passing themselves off as professional journalists or industry bloggers who wish to be taken seriously.

If I were CES management, I'd ban them for life. Can't imagine Apple will let them anywhere near Moscone.

agreed. they should totally be banned for this. its not acceptable behavior.

I agree it was immature.

Still, it probably will lead vendors to 'secure' their sets in the future, and the fact that it was so obnoxious and obvious means it's very unlikely this sort of vulnerability will present itself next year.

the thing is, at a trade show, this shouldn't be an issue, as since gizmondo wants to act like a child, people have to spend more time and energy to make sure it doesn't happen again? its everyone paying for some stupid prank that was meaningless in the first place, which is way gizmondo fails.

gwangung
Jan 13, 2008, 03:06 PM
You're issued press credentials to report on the news at a conference. You're not supposed to MAKE news at a conference.

Teddy's
Jan 13, 2008, 03:24 PM
That's so childish. I hope somebody sue their asses off. Gizmondo did something like "smashmyces.com" I don't know.

exspes
Jan 13, 2008, 04:04 PM
What I'm wondering is.. if Gizmodo never posted that video, would we have heard about it anyway? As in, would there be news stories saying "Pranksters hit CES hard by turning off displays"

My guess is we wouldn't have heard anything of the sort.

r.j.s
Jan 13, 2008, 04:09 PM
As someone who acts as a media liaison, if a media outlet did something along those lines at one of my functions, and bragged about it, they would be banned for a very, very long time from coming back to any of our events.

Cleverboy
Jan 13, 2008, 04:12 PM
What I'm wondering is.. if Gizmodo never posted that video, would we have heard about it anyway? As in, would there be news stories saying "Pranksters hit CES hard by turning off displays"
My guess is we wouldn't have heard anything of the sort.Very true. They were so proud, they incriminated themselves, and went so far as to say that Panasonic was "lucky" they didn't have an exposed IR receiver fro their 150 inch display. Wow.

~ CB

r.j.s
Jan 13, 2008, 04:17 PM
What I'm wondering is.. if Gizmodo never posted that video, would we have heard about it anyway? As in, would there be news stories saying "Pranksters hit CES hard by turning off displays"

My guess is we wouldn't have heard anything of the sort.

Chances are, the presenters all thought they had come kind of HW failure/ power failure up until the point Gizmodo posted their footage.

uburoibob
Jan 13, 2008, 07:27 PM
I gotta say, Gizmodo sucks big time cuz of this. Once in my CoolSites bookmark folder, they are now off my radar. Goodbye Gizmodo...:mad:

toxicbomber
Jan 14, 2008, 04:00 PM
Nope, Gizmodo will still be attending Mac World. $50 to all of you if they pull the same shinanigan at Mac World. They only did it because it was original and no one else has done something like they had before. :D So yep, $50 says they wont do it again.

toxicbomber
Jan 14, 2008, 04:04 PM
Hope they don't shut down Steve's screen at the keynote...

It won't happen. The signals from Steve's clicker go over radio and are paired with projectors are behind the screen. No way in the world is it possible to interfere with the keynote. They are prepared for any event that might happen. Trust me. :apple:

iPhil
Jan 14, 2008, 04:10 PM
The MW exhibitors should do this (http://www.tuaw.com/2008/01/13/macworld-exhibitor-tip-disable-the-ir-port-on-your-macs/) to void the snafu that happened @ CES '08.. :D :o

Fearless Leader
Jan 14, 2008, 04:14 PM
The first bit was funny for this teenage, but this was nothing for a "Journalist" to be doing.

smadder
Jan 14, 2008, 05:32 PM
Worse than lame.

Where does Gizmodo operate from? I'm going to pay them a visit and turn their monitors off. If you can't tell that's a metaphor for kicking them in the shins and then the face.

And then maybe if there's enough time, I'll force them to watch Dark Planet or that episode of Battlestar Galactica 1980 where the kids go up in a tree and turn invisible and start throwing apples at the people down below and they have those ridiculous viper bikes.

Anyone remember Tek Wars? What a show!

That... that was something.

ThunderLounge
Jan 14, 2008, 06:33 PM
I'm surprised nobody picked up on their title.

"Confessions: The meanest Thing Giz..."

Meanest? It may just be a poor choice of words, but in light of the situation it makes you wonder "what else" they did and aren't admitting to.

Stevenup7002
Jan 14, 2008, 06:37 PM
If anyone sitting in the front row of macworld, or works backstage there, please, bring your apple remotes and reak havok during a demo presentation. But seriously, DONT

-Steve

Scowlerjase
Jan 14, 2008, 07:15 PM
Gizmodo , as we say in the North of England , have well and truly p*ssed on their own chips.

sundancekid
Jan 14, 2008, 08:16 PM
Hey bad news is better than no news. I'd bet Gizmodo will get a few more hits out of this and maybe ces will attract some more people to see what will happen next year. It may be in the end one of the better things to have happened to this event. (Just a different way of looking at it)

Cleverboy
Jan 14, 2008, 08:23 PM
Hey bad news is better than no news. I'd bet Gizmodo will get a few more hits out of this and maybe ces will attract some more people to see what will happen next year. It may be in the end one of the better things to have happened to this event. (Just a different way of looking at it)Wow. No. This (or anything like it) isn't something to "look forward" to next year. This was just STUPID. Yes, Gizmodo got extra traffic out of it... its what they do. I thought Leo Leporte was unreasonable for his dislike of Gizmodo, but they are now OFF my Google homepage and out of my bookmarks, and have earned a measure of disrepect for many of their readers. If they have anything more to say, I will likely never hear of it. Hopefully Engadget and other websites can make sure I get the news I would have heard from Gizmodo. I'll miss Jesus' artwork, but oh well. Plenty of other talented people out there.

~ CB

bmorris
Jan 14, 2008, 08:32 PM
i feel bad for the motorola guy.
but the other stuff hilarous!

theBB
Jan 14, 2008, 08:48 PM
Now, Gizmodo just posted another editorial. They are not just refusing to apologize, they are actually proud. Supposedly this is a an act of civil disobedience, a sign of their independence. Not only are they being immature jerks, but exhibit this self righteous attitude. It is just a prank, (actually it is not even a creative one) so it is not that big of a deal, but their new editorial makes them seem even more immature. I wonder if somebody is going to play pranks on them to show some independence of his own.

jackc
Jan 14, 2008, 08:56 PM
Now, Gizmodo just posted another editorial. They are not just refusing to apologize, they are actually proud. Supposedly this is a an act of civil disobedience, a sign of their independence. Not only are they being immature jerks, but exhibit this self righteous attitude. It is just a prank, (actually it is not even a creative one) so it is not that big of a deal, but their new editorial makes them seem even more immature. I wonder if somebody is going to play pranks on them to show some independence of his own.

Linky (http://gizmodo.com/344447/giz-banned-for-life-and-loving-it-on-pranks-and-civil-disobedience-at-ces)

They should be writing political speeches, I had a tear rolling down my cheek thinking about how they're standing up to corporations

deejemon
Jan 14, 2008, 09:55 PM
*

ezekielrage_99
Jan 14, 2008, 11:26 PM
I think they'll be barred after this....

http://gizmodo.com/344673/do-you-really-think-the-macworld-keynotes-leaked-on-wikipedia

phillipjfry
Jan 15, 2008, 12:09 AM
...
"I love practical jokes" is just another way of saying "I don't have the intelligence or sophistication to appreciate genuine humour, but I know how to hurt people".

Morons.

Practical jokes are very possible to pull off while being humorous and not hurt anyone. It's the dumb "jokes" that hurt people (if you mean physically). I've pulled practical jokes a lot over the years and the people I did it too took it very lightheartedly and went home unscathed.

That said, I do agree that maybe once (maaaybe twice) would have been a good chuckle, but the line was drawn and passed after they did it to the moto guy. They owe him a serious apology cause that's just too harsh to have things messing up in his face. He probably spent a lot of time getting his stuff together to stand up there and jabber on in the name of his company.

My .02$, I've never read Gizmodo and will probably pass up the opportunity seeing as how they don't have much regard for reporting the news as they do BEING it.

BigJohno
Jan 15, 2008, 12:35 AM
I think they'll be barred after this....

http://gizmodo.com/344673/do-you-really-think-the-macworld-keynotes-leaked-on-wikipedia

Dude this is insane if its real. Yah think???

evilgEEk
Jan 15, 2008, 12:36 AM
Wow. Are they 14 years old?

Seriously, I remember doing something like this back in junior high school with one of those giant remote control watches.

But that was when I was 14 years old; this is just ridiculous, and not funny in the least. Way to show some professionalism. I truly hope they suffer for this.

I really am baffled that "adults" would find this funny.

Idiots.

solvs
Jan 15, 2008, 01:33 AM
Blogging isn't journalism,
No, but there are some who are trying to be taken seriously. They had a press pass. As has been repeated multiple times, this hurts the entire blogging industry (and it is an industry) who cover things as journalists. This isn't some old lady down the street, this is a tech blog that's a business itself that has been built up over the years in an attempt to be taken seriously and get press access to just events and products to test for their articles. That's all been destroyed with one stupid act, which they're now trying to turn into an act of defiance. They made some interesting points in the last spiel, but it doesn't change the fact that if they want to be taken seriously, and they claim to want to be, at least more than those who are bought or don't ask the tough questions, this isn't going to help.

So when they do try to post something serious, and they have, is it any wonder if we won't trust them or believe them, or even care?

ezekielrage_99
Jan 15, 2008, 06:06 PM
Dude this is insane if its real. Yah think???

I wasn't saying if it's real or not it's the fact that Gizmodo just did a huge prank and they listed a Keynote supposedly from Apple. Real or not Apple is very protective about information about themselves.

phatboy
Jan 15, 2008, 08:36 PM
hahaha. that is quality! the comedy value is immense :P

gwangung
Jan 15, 2008, 09:06 PM
Blogging isn't journalism, otherwise Mrs Weisman down the street who blogs about her bridge club is a journalist. Did we really learn nothing from the Engadget Apple stock thing?

Well, actually, not quite...A journalist reports. If you report, you're a journalist. Some folks are better at it than others.

Bloggers should be treated as they are - private citizens under no journalistic fact or ethics obligations.

Again, not quite. They were issued a press pass. Implicitly, you're kinda beholden to journalistic ethics and obligations. Ethically, you should be beholden to those ethics and obligations, because you got that press pass with the understanding you'd act like a journalist.

Either they were too stupid to understand those ethics, or they chose to break those ethics. Either way, they shouldn't get another press pass, because they've shown they'll abuse it.

GSMiller
Jan 15, 2008, 09:22 PM
I don't know what is more lame...

The fact that Gizmodo actually pulled such a stunt or that Motorola used a presenter with a British accent.

Aperture
Jan 15, 2008, 09:51 PM
As others have said, it may have been funny for one time on the big wall of TVs. Definitely not at a live presentation.

deejemon
Feb 3, 2008, 05:56 AM
*

Cybergypsy
Feb 3, 2008, 07:50 AM
Ban...all the way

sleepingworker
Apr 9, 2008, 01:39 AM
That was painful to watch. Sort of like Jack Ass: The Geek Edition. Of course they should be banned. Gizmodo was interfering with companies trying to present their products.

supamario
Apr 9, 2008, 10:47 AM
They had it coming...you don't do something like that when the entire mac community is watching and expect to get away with it

joefinan
Apr 9, 2008, 10:51 AM
It was amusing at first but when you think how much effort went into all those presentations it's not too fair.

How would gizmodo feel if their site kept randomly going offline...?

They had it coming...

What did who have coming?

BongoBanger
Apr 11, 2008, 03:18 AM
It was funny. Stop crying.

kamm
Apr 12, 2008, 08:30 PM
That was painful to watch. Sort of like Jack Ass: The Geek Edition. Of course they should be banned. Gizmodo was interfering with companies trying to present their products.

...which is absolutely fine. In fact it is a form of standing up for corporations, YES.
Pathetic attempt? Probably, yes, I think so too and also silly but it's still way less disgusting than these ridiculous brainwashed comments here, this incredible hypocrisy people showcase here when it comes to corporations or Apple or anything.
For God's sake the person who was in charge for the presentation should be fired on the spot. Yes, it's that person, his incompetence that allowed this prank.

Man, I never visited Gizmodo regularly but thanks for showing me this piece - I will put them into my Google start page. Not because it's funny - it isn't, it's kinda pathetic - but because apparently they have the guts to do things.
Thanks for the info, again.

kamm
Apr 12, 2008, 08:31 PM
entire mac community

Priceless, that is the word...:D

jonutarr
Apr 13, 2008, 08:44 PM
If i still lived in the city i would buy a TV-B-Gone
they obviously work well :p

229dan229
Sep 9, 2008, 10:50 AM
i thought it was pretty good tbh.

JoeBlau
Sep 18, 2008, 10:38 PM
Blogging isn't journalism...Bloggers should be treated as they are - private citizens under no journalistic fact or ethics obligations.

Actually that is not quite accurate as bloggers are not people.

In any event, people need to lighten up. The self-righteousness exhibited in this forum would be quite amusing if it was not so sad. CES is one massive, pompous, over-wrought technology advertisement, and you are all crying at some schoolboy prank interrupting some guy's presentation.

And just to re-iterate, bloggers are non-professionals hacks that should never be taken seriously in any professional media circles.

t19880821
Sep 22, 2008, 02:01 PM
Actually, this is really immature.

I understand where Giz is coming from about how they're not the protectors of companies, blah blah blah. That's right.. press don't protect companies, and they also don't harm them. "Disrupting" is in the category of harming a company.

So.. it's okay then to turn of people's computers everytime they look at Giz? I mean.. they can just turn them back on, right?

Giz is trying to make a statement, but what they fail to do is show some goddamn respect. How in hell are their writers supposed to get into any more events if they make it public that they have no respect at all for these companies?

Nukey
Sep 24, 2008, 09:09 AM
What a bunch of losers. That guy probably worked really hard on his presentation, and to have it screwed up by a bunch of wannabe-journalists trying to act "cool" for their "blog" is ridiculous. If I were in charge of any of these types of events I'd show these guys the door, permanently. People who think it was funny obviously haven't been on the presenter side of things before.

cbrain
Sep 24, 2008, 02:33 PM
I've just watched the video. Gizmodo really should be ashamed of themselves for that, it just isn't funny. It's disgusting.

xrockislife3016
Sep 30, 2008, 03:00 PM
Bloggers often struggle to gain acceptance as a valid and legitimate source of news, and with this stunt (see link) Gizmodo have helped to undermine those who have worked so hard to gain credibility within an elitist industry.

I'm not without a sense of humour, but when Giz started screwing with a live presentation they crossed a line. This type of behaviour shouldn't be condoned in my opinion and a strong signal should be sent out to those responsible. Who's to say that they wouldn't interfere with an Apple event? What do you make of their actions?

http://gizmodo.com/343348/confessions-the-meanest-thing-gizmodo-did-at-ces
When i found that gizmodo did this i lmao. But dude i guess its a little childish. But hey not like a remote is gonna do much with a laptop

Millah
Oct 2, 2008, 01:07 AM
Actually that is not quite accurate as bloggers are not people.

In any event, people need to lighten up. The self-righteousness exhibited in this forum would be quite amusing if it was not so sad. CES is one massive, pompous, over-wrought technology advertisement, and you are all crying at some schoolboy prank interrupting some guy's presentation.

And just to re-iterate, bloggers are non-professionals hacks that should never be taken seriously in any professional media circles.

Its not about being self-righteous this argument from the posters here and from Gizmodo as well is just pathetic. Its about showing some damn respect. I can completely see it being funny once or twice while people were just on the floor playing around with things, but during a presentation? Really? You don't think people are already uneasy as it is giving a big presentation like that? Not to mention how many hours of preparation goes into these kinds of presentations. This is what High School freshmen do to their substitute teachers to make their classmates laugh, but not some grown adults who are supposed to be professional "journalists." The fact that they are defending themselves as being right and whatever nonsense they are spewing is a joke.

Theres nothing self-righteous about that, just having respect and appreciating that its not easy to get on a stage in front of hundreds of people and try to present something.

Being a Senior in College, I have to give plenty of presentations in front of large groups of people, and I would be frustrated with somebody lacking any kind of respect during my presentation. Luckily, I go to a college with other mature and respectable ADULTS, so I have yet to see some little fag boys doing this.

I can see those clowns from Gizmodo right now at CES getting such a hard-on and giggling with their little butt buddies.

Adamo
Oct 4, 2008, 08:06 AM
I imagine they should be banned from MacWorld, but I also think it's the funniest thing I've seen today and absolutely hilarious. :)

MacTraveller
Oct 4, 2008, 08:15 AM
If I were CES management, I'd ban them for life. Can't imagine Apple will let them anywhere near Moscone.

It's not up to Apple. It's up to IDG. They manage the expo, they administer the expo on behalf of Apple.

JML42691
Oct 4, 2008, 08:21 AM
Wow, can't believe I only first heard about this now. As much as that may seem comical to them, I believe that just about any expo that they might attend they should be banned from. That was just completely cruel to make people's presentations harder (or even impossible if it depended only on displays), and to essentially shut down a major aspect of the expo.

tremendous
Oct 8, 2008, 08:28 AM
i say ban them from life

nothin' but the chair for these practical jokers.

Sesshi
Oct 10, 2008, 03:41 PM
I doubt it'll be necessary, given the Pavlovian nature of most failed wannabe tech journalists - aka bloggers for Engadget and Gizmodo, and staff writers for Computerworld for starters - to drool on command when Apple is mentioned

rhett7660
Oct 10, 2008, 03:47 PM
i say ban them from life

nothin' but the chair for these practical jokers.

I am really surprised someone didn't get hurt?... Could you imagine some of the pissed off people.

I agree.

James17
Oct 12, 2008, 07:06 PM
Gizmodo is not credible in my opinion!

deriko100
Oct 12, 2008, 07:10 PM
I also agree that was stupid to do, but funny, i rely on gizmodo for my daily gadget news awesome site so it shouldn't be punished for that olddddd prank

CrownSeven
Oct 14, 2008, 04:55 PM
Wow. Do you people realize that this topic was originally posted WAY WAY back on Jan 10, 2008, 03:12 PM??? 10 months ago?

JML42691
Oct 14, 2008, 09:11 PM
Wow. Do you people realize that this topic was originally posted WAY WAY back on Jan 10, 2008, 03:12 PM??? 10 months ago?
I did when I made my post, it doesn't change the situation much, if at all. What they did was what they did, and the majority of this discussion was after last year's MWSF, in which case the upcoming MW of which the OP discussed the point of if they should be banned hasn't even happened yet. So this discussion is still very active and relevant.

rowlands
Oct 24, 2008, 11:17 PM
If I recall correctly they did formally apologize. I do genuinely like the guys at Gizmodo and I enjoying their blog, its a personal thing. Some of friends can't stand it and prefer Engadget.

I personally hope that they're given a chance to prove that they can make tech journalism fun without going over the top. If they blow it this time, I fully support punishment.