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View Full Version : Anyone familiar with Powerbook logicboards??




mladen.v
Jan 14, 2008, 09:11 AM
I'd appreciate if someone could tell me how can I identify firewire chip on my Powerbook 12'' 1.5GHz (latest edition). I think its dead so I have to find it somewhere.. Hopefully without changing the whole board. I've heard that Texas Instruments can provide some of these chips... Just I'm not sure what chip is it.
Thanx a lot



robbieduncan
Jan 14, 2008, 09:17 AM
Even if you can buy the chip what are you going to do? It's not like it's in a socket that you can just pull the old chip from. It's surface mounted to the logic board!

mladen.v
Jan 14, 2008, 09:27 AM
Even if you can buy the chip what are you going to do? It's not like it's in a socket that you can just pull the old chip from. It's surface mounted to the logic board!

Yea I know... I would have get it changed by someone.

killerwhack
Jan 14, 2008, 11:13 AM
Surface mount technology was a boon for the electronics industry because:

1. It greatly increased the efficiency of assembly process
2. Made obsolete an entire industry of repair people who could "fix" boards with failed components (as opposed to replacement)
3. ensured that the vast majority of repair revenue would come to the manufacturer because they controlled the technology for repair.

But Surface mount technology also exacerbated the problem of toxic waste as far more equipment was headed towards landfills due to previously stated reasons.

The manufacturers ought to design with chip sockets so that entire logic boards are not rendered useless because one 26 cent part failed. Where is their environmental concern? I can tell you where! It was sold out down the river and buried in a landfill in New Jersey.

robbieduncan
Jan 14, 2008, 11:20 AM
The manufacturers ought to design with chip sockets so that entire logic boards are not rendered useless because one 26 cent part failed. Where is their environmental concern? I can tell you where! It was sold out down the river and buried in a landfill in New Jersey.

That's fine if you are not in a space constrained environment, unlike a Powerbook or any other modern laptop. Sockets make each chip at least 3-4 times taller resulting in significantly larger products...