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MacRumors
Jan 18, 2008, 11:38 PM
http://www.macrumors.com/images/macrumorsthreadlogo.gif (http://www.macrumors.com)

Financial software maker Intuit has been busy over the past year. Two of its major software titles for the Mac, Quicken and TurboTax, have seen or are in the process of being re-written from the ground up to make better use of modern technologies.

Quicken Financial Life for Mac
Quicken for Mac has long existed as a Carbon application due to its pre-existence on Mac OS 9. However, in recent years Quicken for Mac designers have increasingly felt that they were not bringing the product to its fullest potential, and with the transition to Intel a Carbon base with varying 3rd party libraries made a universal binary impossible without a ground-up re-write.

Therefore, Quicken 2007 for Mac will be the last in the current line of Quicken for Mac products and a brand new Quicken for Mac product, currently called "Quicken Financial Life for Mac" is being written. This product will use a slew of Mac OS X technologies. Here's a quick preliminary technical specification rundown:

- Cocoa based
- CoreData for information storage
- Universal Binary
- Mac OS 10.5 Leopard Only
- Coverflow, other Mac OS specific views

Because the application is being built from the ground-up, it will only initially contain a subset of what is currently found in Quicken 2007 for Mac. While it will fully support cash-flow accounts (cash, checking, savings, credit cards), it will have extremely limited support for investments, though you will be able to track your balances and holdings and calculate your net worth. However, TurboTax and DirectConnect/WebConnect features are all to be expected in the 1.0 product.

Pricing hasn't been ironed out yet, but the final version is expected to ship in fall of 2008. Quicken was good enough to supply us with these exclusive high-quality screenshots of the application, but note that the application is still in pre-alpha, so the screens are subject to change.

Images in article (http://www.macrumors.com/2008/01/18/intuit-to-rewrite-quicken-demos-turbotax-2008/)

TurboTax 2008 For Mac
TurboTax has also seen a ground-up rebuild this year. While the changes may not be quite as drastic as Quicken, Intuit says that several highly requested Mac-specific features have been added to this year's product.

Features shared by the Windows product include life change questions that are placed earlier in the preparation process, a help system tied into Intuit's user community, an improved audit risk meter, and a free audit support tool in the unlikely event you are audited.

Mac-only features include:
- A form view that is always accessible and flips into view. Users who are used to filling out paper forms can switch between the interview and the form at any time.
- Save returns to iDisk
- Archive return and TurboTax 2008 to CD
- Create multiple returns (good for figuring out if you want to file jointly or separately)

http://images.macrumors.com/article/2008/01/19/002037-TurboTax1_500.jpg
The TurboTax guys

One More Thing...
Unfortunately, while Intuit has made its strides this year, it has also had its setbacks. In the wake of a very public data loss issue involving QuickBooks 2006, I asked Intuit for an update on the incident and the product.

Intuit was frank that they definitely had encountered a nightmare scenario, and that they took the incident very seriously. Unfortunately, the solution for 2006 users was to turn off automatic updates; however, a fix has been put in place for the 2007 product to ensure that such a scenario does not occur in the future.

As for QuickBooks: users can expect an update this fall with new and improved features, but no it isn't a rewrite.


Read Full Article (http://www.macrumors.com/2008/01/18/intuit-to-rewrite-quicken-demos-turbotax-2008/)



~Shard~
Jan 18, 2008, 11:44 PM
Great news! I use Quicken and QuickTax (Canadian version of Turbo Tax) and find them to be excellent pieces of software. Looking forward to a major update for Mac.

That reminds me, tax season is just around the corner... :o ;)

longofest
Jan 18, 2008, 11:47 PM
Its gonna suck for investors while the new product matures, but I'm glad that Quicken is getting brand new legs. I think its a good move.

~Shard~
Jan 18, 2008, 11:49 PM
Its gonna suck for investors while the new product matures, but I'm glad that Quicken is getting brand new legs. I think its a good move.

Yeah, fair enough, there will no doubt be multiple growing pains. Necessary though, and hopefully worth it in the end.

twoodcc
Jan 18, 2008, 11:51 PM
good news! Quicken was the first financial program that i used on my first mac. looking forward to trying out this new program

kainjow
Jan 18, 2008, 11:55 PM
high-quality screenshots

Those are about as far away from high-quality as you can get ;)

I use TurboTax but have been using the Windows version because I'm afraid to touch their Mac software. Maybe I'll try their 2008 version...

I think it's a sad state in Mac software when Cocoa, Core Data, and Universal Binary are listed as features, or "technologies used". First off, the user doesn't care what technologies were used to create the software. They just want it to be easy to use, have a familiar appearance, and have features that work. Second, universal binary shouldn't even be mentioned anymore, it should just be a given. Lastly, those screenshots look pitiful. For a large company like Quicken, I would never have released those screenshots.

I just installed Office 08 and it is terrible. I guess I've lost all hope in big corporation's ability to produce quality Mac software, even when rewrites are involved.

Nugget
Jan 18, 2008, 11:55 PM
It's hard to imagine that Intuit could be working on software that looks like it will end up being worse than the existing Quicken for Mac embarrassment. But looking at those screenshots is damned depressing. I sure wish someone would come along and offer something that's truly competitive with Quicken for Windows or Microsoft Money.

Financial management apps for Mac is a grim, bleak landscape of suck. At least now that Apple have switched to Intel it's less painful to run Windows in VMware or Parallels in order to run a truly useful money manager.

longofest
Jan 18, 2008, 11:57 PM
Those are about as far away from high-quality as you can get ;)

It's not a picture of a screen, is it? It's an actual screenshot. I'd say "higher", but then I'd have to say who it was higher than ;)

ridli
Jan 18, 2008, 11:58 PM
It'll be interesting to see how it shapes up. I'm very curious to see if they'll opt for a multi-sku release that seems to be all the rage these days on their pc lines.

At the very least, I hope they'll accommodate a "basic" version, at least price wise. As someone who did support for quickbooks for quite some time, I'm very well of exactly how much of Intuit's software I *don't* need. And when I finally switched last year, i balked at spending 70 dollars for the current mac edition knowing full well I wasn't going to use half of it.

I've been making do with custom spreadsheets, but I know I'd really just like something along the lines of the old '01 or '02 quicken for PC, before the bloat really started to set in.

KindredMAC
Jan 18, 2008, 11:59 PM
I use TurboTax but have been using the Windows version because I'm afraid to touch their Mac software. Maybe I'll try their 2008 version...

Don't be scared of TurboTax for Mac.

My wife and I have been using it for about the last 5 years without any problems what so ever.

I didn't like last year's program but that wasn't a Mac thing.... just a TurboTax thing. It seemed like they went too detailed compared to previous versions.

longofest
Jan 19, 2008, 12:00 AM
those screenshots look pitiful. For a large company like Quicken, I would never have released those screenshots. To me it looks more like pre-alpha.

It's hard to imagine that Intuit could be working on software that looks like it will end up being worse than the existing Quicken for Mac embarrassment. But looking at those screenshots is damned depressing. I sure wish someone would come along and offer something that's truly competitive with Quicken for Windows or Microsoft Money.

Financial management apps for Mac is a grim, bleak landscape of suck. At least now that Apple have switched to Intel it's less painful to run Windows in VMware or Parallels in order to run a truly useful money manager.

Can you guys specifically state what you don't like about the screens? Personally, I love the interface. I'm a big fan of where they're going with the tag view, and having an application abide by Apple's interface standards and using its Cocoa UI technology is a good thing, not bad, in my opinion anyways.

bobber205
Jan 19, 2008, 12:01 AM
It's always nice to see OS X getting very large application development support. :cool:

NewSc2
Jan 19, 2008, 12:06 AM
I'd really look forward to an updated QuickBooks for Mac.

glennsan
Jan 19, 2008, 12:09 AM
What I'd really like to see happen is for it to be able to update my Quicken 2005 so I did not have to buy the 2007 first. That would just make my day! Of course I will admit to being easily amused. :)

Glennsan

RaceTripper
Jan 19, 2008, 12:12 AM
I used Quicken on the PC, and had to dump the product when I moved back to Mac. It couldn't transfer its data from the PC version to the Mac version properly, and lost a bunch of transactions making it useless to me. Fortunately iBank 2 was able to read my Quicken data accurately & I've never looked back. I'll never trust Quicken to my data again.

Nugget
Jan 19, 2008, 12:15 AM
Can you guys specifically state what you don't like about the screens?

I have about three hundred complaints about how terrible Quicken for Mac is. "It's not shiny enough" didn't make the list. The screenshots look lickable, sure, but they also look like a really horrible financial management application -- about ten steps in the wrong direction. Coverflow? Seriously? That's their big plan? I'm not going to overlook all the app's deficiencies just because it's nice to look at.

I want an app that's functional at the level that Quicken for Windows or Microsoft Money is. I could not care in the least that it uses all the fancy CoreVideo eye candy available in OS X. The silly web 2.0-looking tag cloud is just embarrassing. How is that supposed to be useful? It's just trendy with apparently no thought put towards the more important issues of features and usability.

kainjow
Jan 19, 2008, 12:15 AM
Can you guys specifically state what you don't like about the screens? Personally, I love the interface. I'm a big fan of where they're going with the tag view, and having an application abide by Apple's interface standards and using its Cocoa UI technology is a good thing, not bad, in my opinion anyways.

They look like prototype screenshots to be honest. Something the engineers would develop and give to QA for review, not something to show to potential customers. They UI approach they are using just doesn't fit for financial data.

I just feel that Mac developers are placing too much emphasis on UI and not enough on usability and features, and it looks like Quicken is going down this path too.

Edit: Nugget mentioned everything I wanted to, but didn't. I agree with him 110%.

bdkennedy1
Jan 19, 2008, 12:15 AM
I love the nice, clean look. Why would accounting software have flashy graphics?

What I'm concerned about is that this article states that Quicken 2008 will initially only offer a subset of features. I say finish the software properly and release it as 2009 software.

sebastianlewis
Jan 19, 2008, 12:28 AM
I love the nice, clean look. Why would accounting software have flashy graphics?

What I'm concerned about is that this article states that Quicken 2008 will initially only offer a subset of features. I say finish the software properly and release it as 2009 software.

Probably just to get the foundation out there. Cocoa makes it easier to develop new applications much much faster although it's going to be fairly basic, so in this case they get it out there and then start re-adding features for the 2009 version, if you don't like that though I guess you can stick with the 2007 version.

Sebastian

longofest
Jan 19, 2008, 12:31 AM
What I'd really like to see happen is for it to be able to update my Quicken 2005 so I did not have to buy the 2007 first. That would just make my day! Of course I will admit to being easily amused. :)

Glennsan

I love the nice, clean look. Why would accounting software have flashy graphics?

What I'm concerned about is that this article states that Quicken 2008 will initially only offer a subset of features. I say finish the software properly and release it as 2009 software.

1) The software is not going to be called Quicken 2008. The current Quicken line is dead.
2) taking an extra year to "finish" the software will miss out on important revenue for them to continue their development. And to be honest, if you really need the investment features that won't be present at first, then by all means, don't buy the 1.0 product. However, I for one, will be buying it.

In cordial disagreement with some of the others, I think that the new UI improvements are actually really good and important improvements to these financial applications. The cloud view might be a "trendy" and web 2.0 thing to do, but I could immediately see the use for it, and when you look at it, you can immediately see what you're spending most on. It's a nice and modern way to view your financial data.

Nugget
Jan 19, 2008, 12:31 AM
OK, here's some more tangible complaints.


Quick -- Looking at the screens available, tell me how much money in total this person owes on their credit cards? In Quicken for Windows account balances are conveniently located in the account bar, with subtotals and totals by account type. In this new version they've eliminated this very useful display in the interests of maintaining the new, clean UI style. Significant loss of function.
A selection box to choose a memorized Payee? Seriously? After a few years of Quicken usage you've probably got several thousand payees that are available for autocomplete. The only sane way to handle that it simple typing autocomplete. Maybe if you're being fancy an autocompleting drop-down, but hardly anyone will actually ever click on it. You just type until you've got enough to make the match and tab to the next field. The translucent box with the vertical scrollbar was obviously chosen because they wanted to use a translucent box with a vertical scrollbar -- not because anyone thought it would be the most effective input method.
Transaction tags but not categories? Not bad for Flickr, but horrible for Quicken. I'm assuming this means that you can no longer create a hierarchy of transaction types making reporting less useful. Quick, run a report of all taxes paid. Is it easy now that they're just atomic tags and not subcategories of "Taxes"? Any sort of hierarchy similarity is going to yield confusing overloaded tags to fake out the multiple levels. Consider, for example, the Income:* and Income, Spouse:* groupings in "real" Quicken.
Tag cloud: heck, even in the screen shot we can see some jarring problems. There's tags for "acura" and for "auto." What's that supposed to mean? Is a transaction that's double-tagged showing up for both categories? Wouldn't that sort of ruin the (questionable) purpose of the tag cloud?
Split transactions - no longer supported? It would seem so. The whole notion of a split transaction would be fundamentally incompatible with tagging.


The bottom line is this: the screenshots would seem to demonstrate an application that is being designed backwards. One gets the sense that the designers sat around a table and made a list of all the cool UI elements they'd ever seen and then, after making that list, tried to find places to use those cool UI elements in the app that they wanted to build. Shouldn't it be the other way around?

chasemac
Jan 19, 2008, 12:33 AM
I can calculate my net worth. Thanks:)

grappler
Jan 19, 2008, 12:47 AM
None of this really matters. Applications are moving to the web, and in the case of financial applications, the benefits are obvious. A web-based personal financial dashboard can, in principle, track all your checking, savings, money market, investment and retirement accounts automatically by communicating directly with the institutions. Same with your lines of credit, car and home loans, and even the assets tied to those loans (just ask blue book and zillow repeatedly for rough estimates).

We have proven willing to execute transactions online, to do our banking online at the websites of individual banks, to store gigabytes of email history going back years in the cloud, which besides containing loads of personal information, also would likely help a snooper to log into many of our other accounts online through the "here's your new password" messages they send us.

Who wants to bother with syncing your pc to keep all this information current, when you could just have it all in the cloud and get to it from any pc and many smartphones?

Some sites, like mint.com, are already headed down this path.

MacAficionado
Jan 19, 2008, 12:50 AM
They are showing iBank 3 beta at Macworld and it will do Web Connect, Direct Downloads and your investments.
The guy also showed me an iPhone web app that syncs with .Mac to input transaction on the iPhone.

I was impressed and am looking forward to it.

http://www.iggsoftware.com/ibank3/index.php (http://www.iggsoftware.com/ibank3/index.php)

longofest
Jan 19, 2008, 01:00 AM
OK, here's some more tangible complaints.


Quick -- Looking at the screens available, tell me how much money in total this person owes on their credit cards? In Quicken for Windows account balances are conveniently located in the account bar, with subtotals and totals by account type. In this new version they've eliminated this very useful display in the interests of maintaining the new, clean UI style. Significant loss of function.
A selection box to choose a memorized Payee? Seriously? After a few years of Quicken usage you've probably got several thousand payees that are available for autocomplete. The only sane way to handle that it simple typing autocomplete. Maybe if you're being fancy an autocompleting drop-down, but hardly anyone will actually ever click on it. You just type until you've got enough to make the match and tab to the next field. The translucent box with the vertical scrollbar was obviously chosen because they wanted to use a translucent box with a vertical scrollbar -- not because anyone thought it would be the most effective input method.
Transaction tags but not categories? Not bad for Flickr, but horrible for Quicken. I'm assuming this means that you can no longer create a hierarchy of transaction types making reporting less useful. Quick, run a report of all taxes paid. Is it easy now that they're just atomic tags and not subcategories of "Taxes"? Any sort of hierarchy similarity is going to yield confusing overloaded tags to fake out the multiple levels. Consider, for example, the Income:* and Income, Spouse:* groupings in "real" Quicken.
Tag cloud: heck, even in the screen shot we can see some jarring problems. There's tags for "acura" and for "auto." What's that supposed to mean? Is a transaction that's double-tagged showing up for both categories? Wouldn't that sort of ruin the (questionable) purpose of the tag cloud?
Split transactions - no longer supported? It would seem so. The whole notion of a split transaction would be fundamentally incompatible with tagging.


The bottom line is this: the screenshots would seem to demonstrate an application that is being designed backwards. One gets the sense that the designers sat around a table and made a list of all the cool UI elements they'd ever seen and then, after making that list, tried to find places to use those cool UI elements in the app that they wanted to build. Shouldn't it be the other way around?

1) the images are of pre-alpha software that isn't due until this fall. you may want to submit your first comment to Intuit and see what they say.
2) the payee field DOES auto-complete. This is MORE functionality than what you are describing, in that it is allowing the user to either enter text OR use their mouse as they are typing to select a payee
3) like i said, pre-alpha. The tagging feature seemed like they were just showing off the beginnings of what they were doing. I'm personally all for new ways to view how I'm spending my money.
4) acura vs. auto... come on dude... that's just what the demo data had in it!
5) even in split transactions, you enter categories. The tagging feature would be 100% compatible with split transactions.

Doctor Q
Jan 19, 2008, 01:02 AM
Kudos to MacRumors for asking the touchy question about the data loss incident.

longofest
Jan 19, 2008, 01:15 AM
Kudos to MacRumors for asking the touchy question about the data loss incident.

Oh, that was fun.

kresh
Jan 19, 2008, 01:20 AM
CoreData for information storage



Does this mean a non-proprietary file format? I hope so. It would be nice if Intuit opened the data frameworks and implements an easy to use plug-in architecture.

The thing I really love about using a Mac is the outstanding helper utilities/accessories that the smaller Mac developers crank out. If Intuit let them loose on "Quicken Financial Life for Mac" then I think the :apple: Mac could become the platform of choice for personal financial management.

Come on Intuit, you're going to have to do a re-write anyway, do something spectacular!

coolfactor
Jan 19, 2008, 01:35 AM
I think it's a sad state in Mac software when Cocoa, Core Data, and Universal Binary are listed as features, or "technologies used". First off, the user doesn't care what technologies were used to create the software.

You mean you don't care. The use of native features of OS X illustrates a commitment by the developer to be supporting the individuality of the operating system, rather than using some other proprietary solution.


I just installed Office 08 and it is terrible. I guess I've lost all hope in big corporation's ability to produce quality Mac software, even when rewrites are involved.

Big corporation? Does that mean you have no faith in Apple? They deliver quality software all year round, and they are a big corporation. I'm confused by your generalization.

coolfactor
Jan 19, 2008, 01:42 AM
Does this mean a non-proprietary file format?

Most likely. Core Data can store in SQLite and XML formats, as I understand it. These are perfectly readable by third-party software. However, Core Data also supports a binary format, which is the fatest performance-wise, and I'm not sure if this would be accessible to outside code. Probably, through the API, but figuring out the schema would be more difficult.

Rodimus Prime
Jan 19, 2008, 01:58 AM
They look like prototype screenshots to be honest. Something the engineers would develop and give to QA for review, not something to show to potential customers. They UI approach they are using just doesn't fit for financial data.

I just feel that Mac developers are placing too much emphasis on UI and not enough on usability and features, and it looks like Quicken is going down this path too.

Edit: Nugget mentioned everything I wanted to, but didn't. I agree with him 110%.

well what do you expect when you have a bunch of users who care more about looks than function. To many mac users will refuse to use a program if it is not pretty enough. Who cares if how functions a ugly sharp corner looking UI is.
Because of this features and unsaleable get cuts so the whiners who like it pretty get what they want.

Hell I know a lot of specially software that you can get for windows that a mac users would say it is crap because it looks ugly. Yeah I will admit those programs UI are not pretty in the slightest but it all about function and very little time was put into looks.

I personally believe function over form any day of the week.

Peace
Jan 19, 2008, 02:01 AM
1)
In cordial disagreement with some of the others, I think that the new UI improvements are actually really good and important improvements to these financial applications. The cloud view might be a "trendy" and web 2.0 thing to do, but I could immediately see the use for it, and when you look at it, you can immediately see what you're spending most on. It's a nice and modern way to view your financial data.






I see where they're going design wise and it looks nice. Let's hope they get the
real banking part right.





Come on Intuit, you're going to have to do a re-write anyway, do something spectacular!




This is something Intuit should have been working on for 3 years.
Good to see they're finally doing it albeit very late in the transition.

Analog Kid
Jan 19, 2008, 02:13 AM
Upload my financial data to iDisk?! Oy.

Edgejr
Jan 19, 2008, 02:26 AM
The thing that the article does not mention, is whether Intuit will finally bring data file compatibility with the Windows Quicken. That would be the single most important feature they could implement. I have spoken with a number of people that (1) don't like the limitations of the Mac version and (2) won't switch to Mac solely because moving their Windows data file is such a pain in the petard.

If you e-mail Quicken about this issue, it gets shunted off to some guy in Mumbai and the message never makes it to the developers. Anybody have an e-mail address at Quicken that will actually get to the Mac developers????

pr43
Jan 19, 2008, 03:06 AM
Quicken '08 to be a subset of current version? Quicken Mac is already a subset of the Win version of the product. Anymore more "subsetting" and they should stuff No2 pencils and a check register in a box and sell that.

I endure running the Quicken 2006 basic version in a Virtual PC penalty box, because my data file is almost 20MB and can ill afford to lose something as basic and common as a 401K plan support. Yes, yes I know the Mac version now supports 401ks, but it doesn't migrate the information from the Win version data file. Does anyone want to lose or re-key 12+ years of data?

To add further insult, I expect a de-support notice sometime soon and require a purchase to the current version to allow investment price tracking. I understand the basic version is for 1st time users only and to migrate data, you have to purchase the more expensive Deluxe version.

GNUMatrix
Jan 19, 2008, 03:27 AM
It's only three screenshots and look at all the negative comments?!

I dunno, having a commitment to undergo a major redevelopment of an application, particularly an accounting application, can't be all this bad?! Sure, they want it to look like iTunes as that is likely what any PHB is going to point at and say "make it look like that". How many iTunes installs/users are out there? How many??? It is unquestionably successful I think, so people are going to want to make software that looks/works the same way.

I also don't think an accounting app has to look like a 1986 spreadsheet. Sure, there are a lot of lower level things that you might want to do, and maybe some get their kicks out of GLs and that kind of thing, but for Quicken (not QuickBooks necessarily) it has to be easy and 'pretty' to make it less burdensome on the user. This isn't their first app, I'm sure they know this better than most and will make something that is ultimately useful.

wongulous
Jan 19, 2008, 06:21 AM
Well, you know what, it looks amazing to me--especially compared to its competitors in the consumer/prosumer/soho biz that are mostly web-based. The interface could actually make budgeting stomachable and tracking my data possible. Plus, the booth guys are hot. :)

SciTeach
Jan 19, 2008, 07:03 AM
Kudos to MacRumors for asking the touchy question about the data loss incident.

Oh, that was fun.

I agree. As a form of media and with members of MR as reporters, sometimes questions have to be asked. Usually in the mass media, incident "X" will occur that is bad news and that's the end of it. The public never hears about the solution or the outcome from the media (Unless you search hard for it). We live in a society of hear-and-now. Good Job MR!

As for the article about Quicken and TurboTax, good news all around. Quality products.

ANYTHING is better than TaxCut. I'd rather hand write my taxes and do the math with a abacus than use TaxCut.

Roller
Jan 19, 2008, 07:11 AM
It's only three screenshots and look at all the negative comments?!

I dunno, having a commitment to undergo a major redevelopment of an application, particularly an accounting application, can't be all this bad?! Sure, they want it to look like iTunes as that is likely what any PHB is going to point at and say "make it look like that". How many iTunes installs/users are out there? How many??? It is unquestionably successful I think, so people are going to want to make software that looks/works the same way.

I also don't think an accounting app has to look like a 1986 spreadsheet. Sure, there are a lot of lower level things that you might want to do, and maybe some get their kicks out of GLs and that kind of thing, but for Quicken (not QuickBooks necessarily) it has to be easy and 'pretty' to make it less burdensome on the user. This isn't their first app, I'm sure they know this better than most and will make something that is ultimately useful.

I wish I had as much confidence as you that Intuit will do the right thing for Mac users. But their track record these past few years hasn't been stellar. Most recent updates have provided little new functionality at a cost that was similar to what I originally paid for Quicken about 12 years ago.

I'm also leery of the tagging feature, at least as it appears in these limited screenshots. As I think someone else pointed out, tags can't replace the hierarchical category scheme that Quicken has now.

IMO, there's no excuse for Intuit not including every feature in the Windows version, as long as there's nothing that prevents its implementation on the Mac. Using Mac-specific technologies is great, but it's not sufficient in and of itself.

ifonline
Jan 19, 2008, 07:27 AM
Yes, I realize this is a pre-Alpha version (whatever that is actually supposed to mean), but this looks to be headed down the wrong path to me. I hate tag clouds... that concept is juvenile and too cluttered as far as I am concerned, and to see Intuit pumping this junk into Quicken for the Mac is sad. I am in the market for a better financial application, and seeing this junk is enough to push me away from Intuit.

I wish I could change their mind and have them simply re-code the current version of Quicken into a native application. I like the workflow. I like the layout (although a unified window would be much better). I like the lack of a tag cloud (man, even typing that feels childish).

I agree with others... it really seems like the developers at Intuit sat around and said "hey, we need to do cool things like drop-down transparent black lists and tag clouds... ooh, tag clouds!"

sushi
Jan 19, 2008, 07:31 AM
Great news! I use Quicken and QuickTax (Canadian version of Turbo Tax) and find them to be excellent pieces of software. Looking forward to a major update for Mac.
Likewise.

That reminds me, tax season is just around the corner... :o ;)
One word... :eek:

jragosta
Jan 19, 2008, 07:53 AM
I think it's a sad state in Mac software when Cocoa, Core Data, and Universal Binary are listed as features, or "technologies used". First off, the user doesn't care what technologies were used to create the software. They just want it to be easy to use, have a familiar appearance, and have features that work. Second, universal binary shouldn't even be mentioned anymore, it should just be a given. Lastly, those screenshots look pitiful. For a large company like Quicken, I would never have released those screenshots.

Finally, they should be incredibly embarrassed that they've gone this long WITHOUT using those features. It would be like a car maker advertising in 2008 that their car has air bags.

They are showing iBank 3 beta at Macworld and it will do Web Connect, Direct Downloads and your investments.
The guy also showed me an iPhone web app that syncs with .Mac to input transaction on the iPhone.

I was impressed and am looking forward to it.

http://www.iggsoftware.com/ibank3/index.php (http://www.iggsoftware.com/ibank3/index.php)

I'm certainly going to have a look at it.

The only thing that keeps me on Quicken is about 15 years of financial history. How does iBank do on importing Quicken history? I know it's listed as a feature set, but does it fully and accurately import everything?

Snits
Jan 19, 2008, 09:29 AM
Apple should take on the banks and Quicken both. The banks have forever been outmoded and unhelpful, moreso even than the music guys. And Quicken has stiffed Mac-side users for the last decade.

As a client/web software approach, the iTunes Store is more than halfway there. An Apple Money client, to replace Quicken, along with all the services that Apple can build in related to finances—banking, investing, ebillings, etc.—can move seamlessly from iMac to iPod to iPhone.

Considerations:
* Apple wants to sell electrons—music, video, software. Money is plenty digital.

* Apple does best when it can run a content stream through its hardware: Music, music, software. Money may be the ultimate content stream. It's certainly the ultimate revenue stream.

It's the next big thing for Apple, which needs gigantic solution-level things to do, now that it’s one of the big dogs. If anyone can make money handling cool, it’s Apple. http://gallery.mac.com/stevenagel01#100085

c0nsumer
Jan 19, 2008, 09:45 AM
To me, there is one hugely important thing missing from Quicken for Mac which keeps me from using it: the ability to import data files from a PC.

I've been using Quicken for PC for about eight years now, and there are quite a few accounts in there, some closed, and all interlinked. When I last looked at how to move this data into Quicken for Mac, Intuit told me that I had to export each account (register) separately as QIF files, then reimport them on the Mac. This would break the links between accounts, so I'd have to spend quite a while putting that all back together.

Additionally, as I normally use both OS X and Windows, it'd be ideal to have data (via backups) portable between the two. That way I could just backup the data on one to a flash drive and then restore it on the other.

Until Intuit sorts out their data formats I'll have to stick with VMware on the Mac for Quicken. (Not that VMware isn't useful for other things as well, but it's absurd that the files aren't compatible.)

-Steve

lkrupp
Jan 19, 2008, 09:52 AM
The thing that the article does not mention, is whether Intuit will finally bring data file compatibility with the Windows Quicken. That would be the single most important feature they could implement. I have spoken with a number of people that (1) don't like the limitations of the Mac version and (2) won't switch to Mac solely because moving their Windows data file is such a pain in the petard.

If you e-mail Quicken about this issue, it gets shunted off to some guy in Mumbai and the message never makes it to the developers. Anybody have an e-mail address at Quicken that will actually get to the Mac developers????

Somebody give this man a cigar! I am continually amazed at how large developers can't seem to produce file and feature compatible versions of their Windows and Mac versions. Intuit and Microsoft are two of the biggest examples. It's like two different companies competing with each other. The Windows and Mac sides of the house don't meet, don't share, don't communicate. As I understand it Adobe Photoshop has file and feature parity but that's probably because the Mac version is still their biggest revenue generator. Otherwise Adobe would be doing the same thing. Oh wait! They are with Photoshop Elements.

This all smells intentional to me.:mad:

gomatt
Jan 19, 2008, 10:18 AM
the only reason I have vmware fusion is to run quicken 2006. I don't understand why they don't include all the features of the windows ver. I use the investments mainly and the last think i need in my finance software is coverflow. sometimes I think simple, non-flared up screens are the best. also, in reply to above, I agree, the importing from windows. I have been on windows quicken forever and it is impossible to transfer without basically redoing all of your work.

TheZA
Jan 19, 2008, 10:19 AM
I'm certainly going to have a look at it.

The only thing that keeps me on Quicken is about 15 years of financial history. How does iBank do on importing Quicken history? I know it's listed as a feature set, but does it fully and accurately import everything?

I've been wondering the very same thing. I had been using Quicken for Windoz from 1995 and this past summer I migrated to the Mac version when I bought a new iMac. I bought Quicken for Mac at the same time I bought the iMac without reading any reviews or anything. Silly me, I just expected that I would have an easy time switching over. After paying the $70+ I was going to make the switch, so I spent a lot of time manually correcting the transactions and balances that didn't transfer correctly. But I'm getting sick of the fact that stock quotes aren't working right because of Intuit server problems, and there is no other download option, and the lack of features I remember from the Windoz version. Screw Intuit if I'm going to have to pay another $70+ for their new version of Quicken that won't fully support investment accounts. I've downloaded the demo version of iBank, but the demo version limits you to the first 50 transactions. I transferred my Quicken data, which was easy enough, but things are screwed up, and I'm wondering if that has to do with the limitation of the demo version or because things got screwed up in the transfer. The interface and reports and other features in iBank are nice.

Le Big Mac
Jan 19, 2008, 11:23 AM
Its gonna suck for investors while the new product matures, but I'm glad that Quicken is getting brand new legs. I think its a good move.

Finally, they should be incredibly embarrassed that they've gone this long WITHOUT using those features. It would be like a car maker advertising in 2008 that their car has air bags.

+1. Good move but, what, 3 years past when it should have happened? Quicken 2007 came out in Fall of 2006, so it will be 2 years just to a new version, and a crippled/partial one at that. So 3 years from one revision to the next full revision, all two years too late.

If Intuit were serious about the Mac, which clearly they weren't until the market share started turning back up, they would have been rolling out the full featured version of this this past fall along with Leopard.

It looks slick and mac-like, which is good, but really I hope they fix some of hte basic functionality problems. And they'd better not cut off web access with older versions as they've been doing in the past to force upgrades . . .

jfruh
Jan 19, 2008, 11:28 AM
Does anyone know how backwards compatible 2008 will be? I've been using 2002 ever since it came out and had been thinking about updating -- I noted that even if I had bought 2007 the app would have had to convert my older data file, which makes me anxious -- wondering if they're even going to keep in compatibility with two versions back in 2008!

Also, exactly how limited with support for investments be in 2008? All I ever do now is manually enter transactions and download price quotes for my mutual funds (when the Quicken server will download them, anyway!). Surely this basic level will continue in the new regime?

Josh

nbs2
Jan 19, 2008, 11:39 AM
Great news! I use Quicken and QuickTax (Canadian version of Turbo Tax) and find them to be excellent pieces of software. Looking forward to a major update for Mac.

That reminds me, tax season is just around the corner... :o ;)

Have you compared the web-based and the disc-based versions of Turbo/Quick Tax? I'm just wondering which is better and more friendly.

On a side note, I'm a little sad that the release won't be until the fall. My wife's PC is giving up the ghost, and her machine is the one that we manage our finance on. It's getting replaced with an iMac, and I would have liked get the new Quicken rather than 07 and then upgrading in a year or so. We may end up taking advantage of the cheap edu XP that we can get and Boot Camp it, but we really don't have much other use for Windows anymore and it doesn't seem worth creating a partition for Quicken. Anybody have any thoughts on the best route?

RaceTripper
Jan 19, 2008, 11:56 AM
I've been wondering the very same thing. I had been using Quicken for Windoz from 1995 and this past summer I migrated to the Mac version when I bought a new iMac. I bought Quicken for Mac at the same time I bought the iMac without reading any reviews or anything. Silly me, I just expected that I would have an easy time switching over. After paying the $70+ I was going to make the switch, so I spent a lot of time manually correcting the transactions and balances that didn't transfer correctly. ....I went from Windows to Mac and also bought Mac Quicken. It was a mistake, and I ended up moving my 12 years of Quicken data to iBank 2. I blogged (http://blahblahblah.info/2007/06/08/quicken-is-incompatible-with-itself/) about my experience switching.

bikertwin
Jan 19, 2008, 12:06 PM
Those GUI screen shots are a billion times better than the current version or even the Windows version. Sure the cloud tag isn't really necessary, and CoverFlow doesn't make any sense for accounts (they all look the same!).

But CoverFlow would make sense for reports or for scrolling through transactions within an account (it would be nice, for example, if you could use CoverFlow to scroll through transactions within an account, showing the logo of the companies you are writing your checks to, so you could quickly get a visual feel for how often you're buying at Starbucks or Target or Best Buy).

That being said, I gave up on the Mac versions of Quicken & QuickBooks back when the Windows versions had online updates & the Mac versions didn't. I had mega problems moving my QuickBooks data back and forth too, for which they actually charged me. Talk about adding insult to injury. So I'm very hesitant to switch back to Mac versions. (Sorry, Intuit. It's your own fault.)

Fahrwahr
Jan 19, 2008, 12:32 PM
Quicken Financial Life for Mac
- Mac OS 10.5 Leopard Only
Seriously? Are they so in love with the technologies only available in Leopard that they couldn't make it compatible with Tiger as well?

This is a significant problem on the Mac today -- Apple releases a major new version every one-and-a-half to two years, and developers either (1) have to keep up with the changes or (2) refuse to use technologies that are available across versions, so we end up seeing support for very usable versions of Mac OS X dropping like flies. Yes, it took Microsoft five to six years to release the successor to Windows XP (and it turns out that it stinks), but at least that gives those who choose not to invest in the latest version of Windows viability in the software space.

Apple is guilty of this (iPod, iWork, and iLife requirements, for example), but you'd expect them to push you to the latest version of their OS. You would think that third party developers would make a greater effort to support what was the current version of Mac OS X as recently as September. Then again, this _is_ Intuit we're talking about…

JaimeChinook
Jan 19, 2008, 12:40 PM
nearly led to tossing my new Mac into the lake. I had used PC Quicken for years; albeit only using one bank account and no other financial stuff. It took multiple calls to Bank of America (who were the most helpful) and to Intuit. Note that Intuit warns of charges for telephone help but they never charged me once since I had software issues. EVERY process suggested by Intuit was incomplete but BOA was able to unveil the missing (and necessary) steps.

I finally was able to completely and accurately convert my old PC files and am limping by on Mac Quicken. Obviously, the download process is the hardest to deal with.

For those of you who have tried and given up on Mac Quicken, I encourage you to persevere. Pick a week when your spouse is away to minimize the risk to divorce...

I look forward to the new version

Jaime

Sceneshifter
Jan 19, 2008, 01:05 PM
I'm looking forward to the quicken update

longofest
Jan 19, 2008, 01:11 PM
Does anyone know how backwards compatible 2008 will be? I've been using 2002 ever since it came out and had been thinking about updating -- I noted that even if I had bought 2007 the app would have had to convert my older data file, which makes me anxious -- wondering if they're even going to keep in compatibility with two versions back in 2008!

Also, exactly how limited with support for investments be in 2008? All I ever do now is manually enter transactions and download price quotes for my mutual funds (when the Quicken server will download them, anyway!). Surely this basic level will continue in the new regime?

Josh

It will be able to import from Quicken 3 onwards

bigandy
Jan 19, 2008, 01:34 PM
i like it. :o

bankshot
Jan 19, 2008, 01:54 PM
It's about freaking time. It's been clear for many years that Intuit really wasn't interested in supporting the Mac, and did so only very grudgingly. Quicken 2002 was so very obviously a bad port of the Windows version to OS 9 and below, which was then even more poorly ported to OS X. Sure, it worked ok once you found workarounds for all the little issues that popped up, but based on those issues, it was clear that they probably had one guy in some dark corner assigned to "make this run on a Mac."

I shudder in horror at the hoops I had to jump through to get it to allow both my wife's and my non-admin user accounts to work on the same data file. There were obviously so many assumptions in that software that you'd be the only user on the computer, and you'd have full admin access. :mad:

Quicken 2006 was moderately better, but essentially the same exact product with a few minor bug fixes.

I'll be cautiously optimistic about this new product for the Mac. The screen shots are nothing to get excited about in and of themselves, either positively or negatively. But they clearly demonstrate a new commitment to the Mac platform for Intuit, and even suggest that they went out and hired actual Mac developers to design and build it, rather than assigning some Windows code monkey to do a "port." That's a huge improvement right there. They're paying close attention to what Apple is doing in their own apps, and that alone is reason for optimism.

Whether the final product turns out to not suck still remains to be seen. All the pretty new features that Apple gives to developers don't mean anything if they're not used properly or if they don't make sense for the functionality in question.

tdhurst
Jan 19, 2008, 02:58 PM
Hey, I know, why doesn't Intuit spend some time making the Mac version of Quickbooks Pro equivalent to its Windows counterpart? Right now it's a retarded cousin and the file types aren't even interchangeable.

Makes it really tough for businesses to switch over to Macs when they can't convert their files...FOR PROGRAMS FROM THE SAME DAMN COMPANY! What would happen if Adobe did this?

Ridiculous.

Roderick Usher
Jan 19, 2008, 03:39 PM
Link to the beta test signup form:

https://quicken.custhelp.com/cgi-bin/quicken.cfg/php/enduser/sign_up.php

tmm4264
Jan 19, 2008, 03:48 PM
I have a complaint lodged with the Better Business Bureau about Quicken 2007 for Mac. You can't register the product online and as a result you can't update your online portfolio.

I've never been impressed with Intuit's Mac support and don't hold out any hope that their product refresh will be any better.

Bosunsfate
Jan 19, 2008, 03:56 PM
I don't know the exact date but Intuit was going to drop all support for Quicken on Mac platforms. That would have been really bad for Apple as it was trying to maintain what hold it had on the home market. Apple countered that by putting Quicken on all new Mac's being sold. Effectively subsidizing Intuit to keep Mac support going.

I've been a Quicken user since 1996 and I made the switch from PC to Mac in 2000. The Quicken import was a nightmare and the loss of functionality had me looking for some alternative. Back then there was nothing for Mac.

I welcome this change by Intuit, but there are bigger problems for them. The product line is very mature and trying to convince people to fork over $70 a year for upgrades does not cut it.

I don't know if I'm willing to make the switch to iBank, but I really like seeing that someone is trying to fill in the void.

CommodityFetish
Jan 19, 2008, 09:21 PM
Glad they're doing something with it, as it was really needed. I'll wait and see what it looks like. But I doubt it's going to get me to drop iBank, which has worked great for me so far.

bking1000
Jan 19, 2008, 09:23 PM
Blech! I moved to Quicken for Mac, and gave up on my past data. It wasn't that big of a blow. I decided I didn't really need to know what I bought 5 years ago. It's really been fine.

That being said, it would be nice to have a native app, but those concepts look like rubbish. I can't believe it -- coverflow for a financial app! WTF?

Any rate, those screen shots do kind of look like mock-ups, which leads me to believe they've just barely got started, and the product isn't likely to be out by Fall 08. My read on it, and I've been around software development now for 14 years, so I think I have a good gut read.

Guess I'll be using Quicken7 for some time yet, because even if they release a second Beta and call it final release in late 08, it's going to be so basic as to be useless. What a shame. Seems like they were caught off gaurd by Mac's new popularity.

jettredmont
Jan 19, 2008, 10:58 PM
Just to be clear here: TurboTax 2007 is the one on the shelves right now, ready to do your taxes between now and April 15, right? TurboTax 2008 really doesn't become relevant until about this time next year for the vast majority of tax-payers.

I'm a bit uncertain of this, because while this has been the naming scheme for tax software as long as I can remember (and, while initially a little confusing, makes the most sense overall), TurboTax's site appears to have no mention of a "model year".

Bosunsfate
Jan 19, 2008, 11:04 PM
Just to be clear here: TurboTax 2007 is the one on the shelves right now, ready to do your taxes between now and April 15, right? TurboTax 2008 really doesn't become relevant until about this time next year for the vast majority of tax-payers.

I'm a bit uncertain of this, because while this has been the naming scheme for tax software as long as I can remember (and, while initially a little confusing, makes the most sense overall), TurboTax's site appears to have no mention of a "model year".

That is correct because TurboTax2007 was already shipped about four months ago.

matthutch
Jan 20, 2008, 01:12 AM
Personally I think it looks like it has the potential to be really good. The interface looks to relatively intuitive - however I've never been much of a fan of those tag cloud type of things, but thats just me.

I have been looking for a financial management/tracking app. for a while, and that looks pretty good. I used the demo of cha-ching for a little while, and it seemed nice but it just didn't seem right for me.

I for one am going to be interested to see how this develops :)

Xealot
Jan 20, 2008, 05:28 AM
What I want to know is if they are going to have Multi-currency support in the new version. I am a new Mac User and I love it. I am an old Quicken user however and I find the Mac version completely useless because of its lack of multi-currency support which is standard on PC versions. I would like to know now if they are going to fix this...if they are great I will wait. If not I don't want to wait around for the next version only to be disappointed. I will need to find an alternative.:apple:

jragosta
Jan 20, 2008, 08:49 AM
Seriously? Are they so in love with the technologies only available in Leopard that they couldn't make it compatible with Tiger as well?

This is a significant problem on the Mac today -- Apple releases a major new version every one-and-a-half to two years, and developers either (1) have to keep up with the changes or (2) refuse to use technologies that are available across versions, so we end up seeing support for very usable versions of Mac OS X dropping like flies. Yes, it took Microsoft five to six years to release the successor to Windows XP (and it turns out that it stinks), but at least that gives those who choose not to invest in the latest version of Windows viability in the software space.

Apple is guilty of this (iPod, iWork, and iLife requirements, for example), but you'd expect them to push you to the latest version of their OS. You would think that third party developers would make a greater effort to support what was the current version of Mac OS X as recently as September. Then again, this _is_ Intuit we're talking about…

Actually, you can blame the developers. If they use the programming tools appropriately, it's not hard to support multiple Mac OS X versions. Using Intuit as an example of how Mac programming should be done is a mistake.

However, limiting your app to the newest OS version isn't as big a mistake for Macs as it would be for Windows. If I remember correctly, something like 20-25% of Mac users had switched to Leopard in the first 3-4 months. Mac users aren't as scared of upgrades as Windows users because upgrading is not usually a problem. By the time the new Quicken is out, this number will be higher - and a good percentage of those who don't upgrade to Leopard are probably not going to be upgrading Quicken, either.

orytek
Jan 20, 2008, 12:30 PM
Intuit obviously puts their most competent software people on TurboTax and Windows versions gets higher priority. Next comes Quicken for Windows and finally, Quicken for Mac. By the time we get to this level you can believe there is some incompetency mismanagement, failure to meet goals etc.
I've seen it for too many years using many of their products even Windows ones.

I have no problem with their TurboTax software but Quicken and Rental Property Manager along with their Medical records software have been disasters and I don't expect the future to be much different.

Nugget
Jan 20, 2008, 01:58 PM
Quicken '08 to be a subset of current version? Quicken Mac is already a subset of the Win version of the product. Anymore more "subsetting" and they should stuff No2 pencils and a check register in a box and sell that.

There you go. That's the crux of the issue summed up brilliantly.

CWallace
Jan 20, 2008, 02:52 PM
I finally bit the bullet and went to Quicken 2007 on my Mac because it was too inconvenient to keep booting Windows to get MS Money to work (which I have used since the day it launched).

Never knew it wasn't universal, but then not like it really needs a lot of CPU cycles. :)

robanga
Jan 20, 2008, 04:13 PM
Really good news, I had delayed buying Quicken for the Mac because of bad reports about its current version. Still using it for Windows.

JaimeChinook
Jan 20, 2008, 06:04 PM
I have used Quicken for years; first PC and then 2007 Mac (when I finally left the dark side...). I am a basic user and limit use to downloading bank data, maintaining my checkbooks and tracking expenditures. I never seriously considered any alternate financial software.

Question: should I consider Ibank? Does Ibank have a sufficient user base to be viable? Can some Ibank users comment about how Ibank 3 might compare for a user like myself with the new Quicken?

Many thanks.

RaceTripper
Jan 20, 2008, 06:59 PM
Can some Ibank users comment about how Ibank 3 might compare for a user like myself with the new Quicken?

Neither have been released so that would be hard to do. I use iBank 2 and like it. I used Quicken PC for years and moved to iBank 2 when I switched back to Mac OS. I'll upgrade to iBank 3 and won't even consider any version of Quicken, especially after the B.S. of trying to get PC Quicken data transferred to the Mac version.

jragosta
Jan 20, 2008, 07:51 PM
Neither have been released so that would be hard to do. I use iBank 2 and like it. I used Quicken PC for years and moved to iBank 2 when I switched back to Mac OS. I'll upgrade to iBank 3 and won't even consider any version of Quicken, especially after the B.S. of trying to get PC Quicken data transferred to the Mac version.

Did iBank 2 import all your Quicken data properly?

RaceTripper
Jan 20, 2008, 08:08 PM
Did iBank 2 import all your Quicken data properly?I imported 12 years of Quicken data. It got all the transactions correct, but it didn't set the cleared flags properly, leaving the reconciled balances wrong. But I set all of them, and then unset the ones for the past month+ that hadn't cleared and got it correct within 15 minutes.

JaimeChinook
Jan 20, 2008, 08:38 PM
I hate to add another variable to this thread but we're on a roll about iBank and one of the add-ons they recommend is QIF Master. Can any iBank and/or 2007 Mac Quicken users comment on the usefulness of QIFM? Thanks

jragosta
Jan 20, 2008, 09:01 PM
I imported 12 years of Quicken data. It got all the transactions correct, but it didn't set the cleared flags properly, leaving the reconciled balances wrong. But I set all of them, and then unset the ones for the past month+ that hadn't cleared and got it correct within 15 minutes.

Sounds like a serious enough bug that maybe it will be fixed in version 3. I might give it a try. Thanks.

rs76
Jan 21, 2008, 03:40 PM
I'm hoping this will be a good move IN THE LONG RUN but I will be a little skeptical until I see the final result given Intuits recent past history with Quicken. The Mac version already is greatly behind the Windows version concerning investments. So what will we be getting exactly? Will Mac owners need to fork over $10 more then the Windows users for a stripped down product (as has been the history)?

If they want this to be an immediate hit they should probably wait until the investment side is up to par. If they will have multiple versions and this will compare in features and price to Mac basic then I'm all for it. Just like Windows owners Mac owners will be willing to pay for feature rich investment additions. Hopefully the investment side will come in good time.

I wonder if Jobs was putting on any pressure. I know Apple probably has no interest in a doing a tax program so he has little wiggle room in creating a competing financial product (a big whole in the Mac App lineup IMO) but he must be telling Intuit to get with it. If Apple did a financial program (iMoney?) it would probably kick butt. Unfortunately Intuit would probably say bye bye TurboTax for the Mac.

Encouraging though. Beggers can't be choosers I guess.

rs76
Jan 21, 2008, 04:55 PM
Quicken '08 to be a subset of current version? Quicken Mac is already a subset of the Win version of the product. Anymore more "subsetting" and they should stuff No2 pencils and a check register in a box and sell that.
I'm a Quicken nerd but that is the best line I've heard in while.:D

FrankM
Jan 21, 2008, 07:36 PM
for me to try Quicken for Mac again. Previous efforts from Intuit at making a Quicken for Mac have been so awful that I trashed them within several weeks of trying to use them. (I bought one version and several years later tried one that came free with a new Mac.) Compared to the Windows versions, they were totally stripped down as far as features and I could never download transactions from my financial institutions properly. Until I hear some rave reviews from users, I'll be watching and waiting.....

TomAH
Feb 17, 2008, 02:23 AM
I understand that you don't want to double-count transactions for the purposes of taxes or budgeting, but certainly having the ability to "tag" or put a transaction in multiple categories has reporting and planning benefits.

For example, if I vacation in San Francisco and buy a shirt as a gift for my daughter, what category do I put it in?

It could be "vacation", "San Francisco", "clothing", "gifts", or "Lauren".

Actually, I'd like to "tag" it with all 5.

I can now ask questions/reports like:

How much did I spend on vacations?
How much did I spend in San Francisco?
How much did I spend on clothing?
How much did I spend on gifts?
How much did I spend on Lauren?
How much did I spend on clothing for Lauren?
How much did I spend on gifts while on vacations?
etc...

You get the idea...there are many different ways to cut this up and the "tag cloud" allows you to do this.

One way to to handle the tax issue, so something isn't double counted, the program could make it so that only one "tax-related" tag could be assigned to a transaction.


If you can neatly fit all your transactions into one category, that's great, but why place that limitation on others who might find multiple categories beneficial?

-Tom

Sped
Aug 10, 2008, 02:19 PM
Anybody heard anything recent about this? Is Quicken going to follow through?

davidwarren
Aug 11, 2008, 09:36 PM
still waiting.....