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View Full Version : Question of timing




SubZer0
Feb 8, 2008, 08:01 PM
First off, this is my first post here, I have been lurking for some time. Second, I don't own an Apple computer nor have I even owned one. However, I am soon to be making a switch for a number of reasons that I won't get into right now.

Here is my question. Do you think Apple screwed up by releasing the MBA with it's current specs now? Perhaps they should have considered a faster processor or more RAM for it's currents specs. Imagine if they had readied the technology to fit the Core2Duo in that size package say about 12 months ago. Wouldn't it have seemed revolutionary?

I had an opportunity to get my hands on the MBA at a local store and I have to say they did a nice job. Depending on what you use your laptop for, this is a nice computer in a nice package. I agree that there are other sub-compact, small framed or what ever you want to call them, computers that may have "better stats" but as far as build quality and the beauty of OSX make it difficult to beat.

I have owned several M$ (dual booting Windows and Linux) laptops including 12" and 13.3" variants. After holding the MBA I am just about ready to purchase one, but I don't quite need a new computer yet :(

What do you think? Was Apple too slow in bringing this to market?

Mark



kyleen66
Feb 8, 2008, 08:09 PM
What do you think? Was Apple too slow in bringing this to market?


I don't believe all the technology was there and working well a year ago. I'm guessing the MBA has been in development for a little over two years. This was a case where the world had to catch up to what the concept envisioned.

From my point of view, I think Apple brought this to market as soon as they were able.

ahaxton
Feb 8, 2008, 08:37 PM
Apple is never too slow in bringing something to the market, one thing you'll learn fairly quickly in the Apple world. The tech didn't exist a year ago.

There isn't anything better currently available in the market.

The MBA brings attention to ultraportables, thats the big difference I see. You have some people looking at the MBA as a laptop and that is it. They haven't looked into ultraportables till now.

Hankster
Feb 8, 2008, 08:38 PM
I don't think Apple makes "mistakes" when it comes to marketing their products. I'm sure A LOT of thoughts goes into their marketing and development department :)

ahaxton
Feb 8, 2008, 08:40 PM
You should take a look at the pics of the "guts" of the MBA. It really is amazing.

SubZer0
Feb 8, 2008, 10:27 PM
I am aware that the technology was recently refined that allowed for a smaller Core2Duo processor and the engineering it took to make the whole package in these dimensions took until now. To clarify a little bit: Do you think the MBA would have been met with less negativity if they could have come to market sooner?

Mark

camarobh
Feb 8, 2008, 10:45 PM
I am aware that the technology was recently refined that allowed for a smaller Core2Duo processor and the engineering it took to make the whole package in these dimensions took until now. To clarify a little bit: Do you think the MBA would have been met with less negativity if they could have come to market sooner?

Mark

What difference does it make? No matter what Apple releases there will always be someone who doesn't like it and wants everyone to know it.

kuwisdelu
Feb 8, 2008, 11:37 PM
Apple is never too slow in bringing something to the market, one thing you'll learn fairly quickly in the Apple world. The tech didn't exist a year ago.

There isn't anything better currently available in the market.

The MBA brings attention to ultraportables, thats the big difference I see. You have some people looking at the MBA as a laptop and that is it. They haven't looked into ultraportables till now.

That's exactly how it was with me. I've had no interest in ultraportables until the MacBook Air was released. They all made compromises that just didn't work for me--like too small a screen and keyboard, too slow a processor, too ugly (yes, we can all be shallow sometimes, can't we?), etc. The MacBook Air isn't what a lot of people expect from an ultraportable, and some don't even consider it one (which is kind of silly). But the MacBook Air really opens up the market to a lot of people who would never have considered an ultraportable before for the same reasons as me, and don't really care about number of ports and "features" like that that really just go unused for most of us. And it may be slow compared to the MacBook and others, but in the world of ultraportables of similar weight, it's pretty damn fast, and certainly fast enough for me.

I am aware that the technology was recently refined that allowed for a smaller Core2Duo processor and the engineering it took to make the whole package in these dimensions took until now. To clarify a little bit: Do you think the MBA would have been met with less negativity if they could have come to market sooner?

Mark

Certainly it would have been, because then everyone would be blown away by Apple's ability to release technology that won't exist for another year. Apple made this as soon as technology allowed. Technology is always advancing, and the MacBook Air is pretty cutting edge right now. Very soon it won't be, because that's how quickly tech changes these days, but it'll be updated again, and so on.

I think the majority of the negativity (not including the haters here on MR, who have their own reasons I have yet to comprehend) comes from a) a fetish of many for bashing Apple and b) not everyone knowing enough about ultraportables to realize why the MBA has to make the sacrifices it makes. Not much to say about (a), but (b) is pretty prevalent, I think. Often people make comments about it not being worth the money, but they only point at the specs as why. E.g. "Look at the MBA's specs compared to the MacBook! The MacBook clearly wins!" That's just missing the point. It's one thing to dismiss the Air because it makes different compromises, and you'd rather have the compromises of a more standard ultraportable, but to dismiss the Air simply because it makes compromises for its size is just misinformed, and I think that's the source of a lot of public negativity.