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View Full Version : Need help... 1.6 or 1.8 80gb..?




ae8za
Feb 10, 2008, 10:31 AM
hi everyone,
was wondering if there will be significant increase in power should i choose 1.8 80gb hdd to 1.6 hdd... please advice.. thanks:)



overanalyzer
Feb 10, 2008, 10:46 AM
You can find performance reviews that have been posted on MR, TUAW, Ars Technica etc. comparing the models, but in general with processors, speed increase with no other changes is a linear (vs. geometric) performance increase, i.e. 10% faster speeds means 10% faster performance. So you can expect roughly a 12.5% increase in the maximum performance of a 1.8GHz processor over a 1.6GHz with everything else being the same. Keep in mind, though, that the processor often isn't the limiting factor - often it's the HDD speed, the amount/speed of the RAM, the speed of the bus, or the software's efficient usage of system resources and threading. So in practical use you'll likely only notice the difference if you're doing things that have high processor usage. If you're just browsing the web, sending e-mail, etc. you likely won't notice much difference. If you're rendering video or using CS3 and the like you're more likely to see the performance gain.

That all being said, there's always the future proofing argument.... A few years down the line when base system requirements have continued increasing and more software is taxing your system at a higher level, you might be happy to have the extra processing speed.

Anderson3133
Feb 10, 2008, 10:55 AM
You can find performance reviews that have been posted on MR, TUAW, Ars Technica etc. comparing the models, but in general with processors, speed increase with no other changes is a linear (vs. geometric) performance increase, i.e. 10% faster speeds means 10% faster performance. So you can expect roughly a 12.5% increase in the maximum performance of a 1.8GHz processor over a 1.6GHz with everything else being the same. Keep in mind, though, that the processor often isn't the limiting factor - often it's the HDD speed, the amount/speed of the RAM, the speed of the bus, or the software's efficient usage of system resources and threading. So in practical use you'll likely only notice the difference if you're doing things that have high processor usage. If you're just browsing the web, sending e-mail, etc. you likely won't notice much difference. If you're rendering video or using CS3 and the like you're more likely to see the performance gain.

That all being said, there's always the future proofing argument.... A few years down the line when base system requirements have continued increasing and more software is taxing your system at a higher level, you might be happy to have the extra processing speed.

Off topic: Well now I know why your name on the forums is "overanalyzer" :rolleyes::apple:

overanalyzer
Feb 10, 2008, 11:04 AM
Off topic: Well now I know why your name on the forums is "overanalyzer" :rolleyes::apple:

Yep, it's self-acknowledged :) Hopefully it helps more often than it hinders.

ae8za
Feb 10, 2008, 11:35 AM
thanks so much guys... i guess i'll get the 1.8 80 gb hdd to replace my old and dead ibook g4 800... hopefully i can swap the hdd with a larger ssd once the price go down a bit...:D

JasonBourne9
Feb 10, 2008, 12:07 PM
I have a 1.8/80

It feels nice and snappy but I probably would have been fine with the 1.6. In fact if my girlfriend ends up wanting one of these, I'll probably give her mine and get a base model for myself. My uses are pretty limited, hers would require more power.

fishblimp
Feb 10, 2008, 12:15 PM
thanks so much guys... i guess i'll get the 1.8 80 gb hdd to replace my old and dead ibook g4 800... hopefully i can swap the hdd with a larger ssd once the price go down a bit...:D

is it possible to do that? i saw that there were comments saying that HD replacement seems possible (by someone who knows what they are doing), but will peopl who have an HDD be able to swap it for a SSD?

I currently use a MBP 2.16 GHz but I tend to do my serious work on my G5. I think 1.8 GHz is fine for what I use my MBP for, but do you think I'll miss the extra 1GB of RAM that I have in the MBP? I mostly use the MBP for web, writing, music. Sometimes I need to work in CS3. I wonder if the MBA is just not right for me? Any comments?

Cybergypsy
Feb 10, 2008, 12:15 PM
the 1.6 is as good as my 2.2 macbook for the things i use it for in 6 months they will have a 2.0 out :)

matthewHUB
Feb 10, 2008, 12:18 PM
1.8 is nice and nippy, but then again i have the SSD. i really think it's worth getting the 1.8, then upgrading later in your case.

kyleen66
Feb 10, 2008, 12:29 PM
I've got the 1.8 with the 80 gig hard drive.

I'm happy with both the computers performance and the amount of space I have on the drive.

fishblimp
Feb 10, 2008, 12:35 PM
I've got the 1.8 with the 80 gig hard drive.

I'm happy with both the computers performance and the amount of space I have on the drive.


did you have to order your configuration directly through the apple store? if so, what was the turnaround between ordering/getting it?

kyleen66
Feb 10, 2008, 12:44 PM
did you have to order your configuration directly through the apple store? if so, what was the turnaround between ordering/getting it?

Yes, for this config I had to go through the Apple Store.

I ordered it on Jan 16, and it shipped on Feb 4. I had it in hand on the 6th.

Probably two to three weeks for shipping? I'm not sure what Apple is currently quoting.

izibo
Feb 10, 2008, 04:10 PM
I don't think the $300 upgrade is justified. I mean, there are so many bottlenecks in this system that you won't see a difference. Future proofing is a silly argument too (I mean, come on... if you are buying an Air you will probably be upgrading in a year or two anyway, if not sooner).

I got the base model, plan on using it for a year or a year and a half and then upgrading.

overanalyzer
Feb 14, 2008, 10:33 PM
I don't think the $300 upgrade is justified. I mean, there are so many bottlenecks in this system that you won't see a difference. Future proofing is a silly argument too (I mean, come on... if you are buying an Air you will probably be upgrading in a year or two anyway, if not sooner).

I got the base model, plan on using it for a year or a year and a half and then upgrading.

Usually future proofing is for keeping a computer in excess of 3-4 years or longer. If you replace your computer every 12-18 months you don't really have to worry about your technology getting out of date, especially since that roughly corresponds to Apple's release cycle. But most people can't afford that luxury so it sometimes makes sense to pay more upfront if you get some extra use out of it before you have to replace it.

Phil A.
Feb 15, 2008, 03:02 AM
Wirelessly posted (iPhone: Mozilla/5.0 (iPhone; U; CPU like Mac OS X; en) AppleWebKit/420.1 (KHTML, like Gecko) Version/3.0 Mobile/4A93 Safari/419.3)

when buying a computer, I normally avoid the fastest one and use the money saved to bump up the memory which generally has a more profound effect on real world performance. However, as this isn't an option on the MBA I went for the 1.8

joefrank64k
Feb 15, 2008, 01:09 PM
I struggled with the 1.6 / 1.8 HDD question myself and I finally went with the 1.6 in part because the cost/benefit analysis didn't seem to add up.

$300 extra for a part that, according to AnandTech (http://www.anandtech.com/mac/showdoc.aspx?i=3226&p=10), costs Apple just $32 extra seems crazy, even by Apple's standards. We all know how inflated their RAM prices are for MB/MBP and the rest of the line...but at least with MB/MBP you can go the Crucial, etc. route to save some serious money.

I just couldn't see how the 1.8 would make any noticeable difference for what I'll use the MBA for...e-mail, web, writing, taking notes, Keynote...I'm putting that $300 towards the SuperDrive, a copy of Fusion, and a copy of WinXP Pro. In a few months when SSD's come down to reasonable price levels (and up to reasonable capacities) I'll follow the DIY instructions at AnandTech (http://www.anandtech.com/mac/showdoc.aspx?i=3226&p=13) and swap in a SSD.