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cl3m0ns
Feb 29, 2008, 10:07 AM
With the new macbooks and macbook pro updates I have finally decided its time for a new portable. I use maya quite a bit but also have a need for portability. I know that maya will run on a macbook pro the old specs were(2.2ghz, 2gb ram, and a graphics card with 128mb of vram)

The new macbooks that they updated tues have 2.4 ghz 2gb or fram (I would upgrade to 4) and a graphics card with 144mb of vram. Would the macbooks be capable of running maya?

The new macbook pros have 2.4 ghz 2gb of ram(upgrade to 4) and a graphics card with 256mb of vram.

The only thing i'm seeing that the macbook pro has that the macbook doesn't is multi-touch, a bigger screen, and more vram. Do you guys think it is worth the extra money for the mbp?



arkitect
Feb 29, 2008, 10:09 AM
Do you guys think it is worth the extra money for the mbp?

If you are running Maya then, without a doubt the extra money will be worth itů

juanm
Feb 29, 2008, 10:26 AM
More important than the VRAM is the graphics processor. Go for the MBP. 3D is better on bigger screens, and for that, in the end, a dedicated graphics is always better.

jerryrock
Feb 29, 2008, 11:44 AM
The MacBook will not run Maya as it has an integrated graphics card that shares system memory and has no dedicated ram of its own.

timimbo85
Feb 29, 2008, 04:38 PM
Ill tell ya from personal debate. Just go with the MBP.. I thought I could get around every corner but the MBP is just they way to go. And if this is for your future / career, its worth the investment.

fluidedge
Mar 3, 2008, 10:58 AM
macbook WILL run Maya, however without dedicated graphics (decent dedicated graphics, that is) you'll get graphics anomolies that will just bug the hell out of you. Things like when you select faces they don't highlight orange. The UV Texture editor might not lay out UVs properly and displaying Hardware textures will not be much fun.

As for rendering, even a quick render of a scene with no textures applied (something i do every 20 mins or so just to make sure everything looks OK!) will become tedious very quickly.

I'd go for the MBP, or even pickup a older PowerBook for when you're out and about and get a mac pro. An good late revision Powerbook (or even an early MBP of you can find one cheap enough) will be better than the MB if cost is your main concern.

kamm
Mar 3, 2008, 11:07 AM
The MacBook will not run Maya as it has an integrated graphics card that shares system memory and has no dedicated ram of its own.

It DOES run Maya.

jerryrock
Mar 3, 2008, 06:10 PM
It DOES run Maya.

Read the following Maya Spec Sheet for supported graphics.

http://download.autodesk.com/us/maya/qualcharts/Maya_OSX_2008.htm

Note that the built in intel graphic chip is NOT SUPPORTED.

fluidedge
Mar 3, 2008, 06:23 PM
...doesnt mean it wont run, just not supported. You wont get the full features of the program and you might get the bugs i outlined.

will definitely run though

cl3m0ns
Mar 4, 2008, 09:01 AM
yeah def. decided on the new mbp's I was only thinking the macbook because the old low end mbp's had 128mb vram and the new macbooks have like 144 or 145 but I don't think that is dedicated. I thought it might be dedicated when i wrote this but based on your guys comments I'm gonna assume it isn't dedicated.

Thanks for the help guys.

stormtroopar
Feb 3, 2009, 06:49 PM
I work in the film visual effects industry so I use maya and other 3d apps extensively.

The main issue usually with running Maya is the graphics card. A more expensive notebook doesn't mean it will run it well versus a cheaper one!! It all depends on the graphics card in the machine.

Typically, an Nvidia graphics card will run it well, even mobile versions. ATI cards' opengl drivers tend to be not very stable and hence why 3d used to run real bad on the Mac because it used to be the only graphics card option. Intel chipset with on board graphics is the worse, it does not support 3d well at all. Drivers are bad for opengl and they are very slow anyway so that is why they are not even supported on the autodesk website.

I used to have a Sony Vaio from 4 years ago and ran maya very well because it used an nvidia 6200m mobile graphics card. That machine is by no means beefy at all, but 3d wise, it ran fine! I have even done lectures and classes on it many times with no problem. So don't misunderstand you have to have a macbook pro to do 3d. Again, its more related to the graphics card and its drivers.

So this leads to the question, does Maya run on the new Macbook notebook and the answer is: Yes!! I just got the new macbook air with the nvidia 9400M chipset and from the brief test I tried, it runs fine and surprisingly didn't have any artifacts I have seen so far... It used to have in past maya versions, especially on OSX.. very prone to display issues. I am running Maya 2009 on it right now, and Zbrush (but zbrush is more cpu bound than gfx card). But typically, if you were using Windows on the Mac with a nvidia graphics card, Maya will run fine. Except a few things like paint effects and whatever else the autodesk website saids.

Also the comment with the video card Ram... I remember the days when even professional open gl cards were only 64mb and Maya ran fine. Video ram isn't as important in 3d content creation software as oppose to gaming. That is unless you do very high resolution complicated work. So don't trust all the hype and talk people and company throw out. Typically, with Nvidia graphics card, Maya and other Opengl application should run fine. If any issue they have on the Mac, its usually because of their drivers on OSX and not the hardware themselves. Doing 3d is probably still more reliable if you had bootcamp and run it on Windows on your Mac. But so far so good for me!

Personally, I am REAL happy they finally switch all their notebook from bottom and up to using Nvidia graphics card and chipset. And I LOVE the new macbook air!!! Its awesome! So light and portable yet, quite fast and does the 3d work when I need to. I am a real happy camper!

Hope this helps.

jamays00
Feb 3, 2009, 08:18 PM
no exp with maya, but new macbook runs modo 302 quite well

fluidedge
Feb 4, 2009, 04:01 AM
I work in the film visual effects industry so I use maya and other 3d apps extensively.

The main issue usually with running Maya is the graphics card. A more expensive notebook doesn't mean it will run it well versus a cheaper one!! It all depends on the graphics card in the machine.

Typically, an Nvidia graphics card will run it well, even mobile versions. ATI cards' opengl drivers tend to be not very stable and hence why 3d used to run real bad on the Mac because it used to be the only graphics card option. Intel chipset with on board graphics is the worse, it does not support 3d well at all. Drivers are bad for opengl and they are very slow anyway so that is why they are not even supported on the autodesk website.

I used to have a Sony Vaio from 4 years ago and ran maya very well because it used an nvidia 6200m mobile graphics card. That machine is by no means beefy at all, but 3d wise, it ran fine! I have even done lectures and classes on it many times with no problem. So don't misunderstand you have to have a macbook pro to do 3d. Again, its more related to the graphics card and its drivers.

So this leads to the question, does Maya run on the new Macbook notebook and the answer is: Yes!! I just got the new macbook air with the nvidia 9400M chipset and from the brief test I tried, it runs fine and surprisingly didn't have any artifacts I have seen so far... It used to have in past maya versions, especially on OSX.. very prone to display issues. I am running Maya 2009 on it right now, and Zbrush (but zbrush is more cpu bound than gfx card). But typically, if you were using Windows on the Mac with a nvidia graphics card, Maya will run fine. Except a few things like paint effects and whatever else the autodesk website saids.

Also the comment with the video card Ram... I remember the days when even professional open gl cards were only 64mb and Maya ran fine. Video ram isn't as important in 3d content creation software as oppose to gaming. That is unless you do very high resolution complicated work. So don't trust all the hype and talk people and company throw out. Typically, with Nvidia graphics card, Maya and other Opengl application should run fine. If any issue they have on the Mac, its usually because of their drivers on OSX and not the hardware themselves. Doing 3d is probably still more reliable if you had bootcamp and run it on Windows on your Mac. But so far so good for me!

Personally, I am REAL happy they finally switch all their notebook from bottom and up to using Nvidia graphics card and chipset. And I LOVE the new macbook air!!! Its awesome! So light and portable yet, quite fast and does the 3d work when I need to. I am a real happy camper!

Hope this helps.

Sorry i just don't agree with what you're saying. nVidia do NOT have better OpenGL drivers than ATI. Barefeats have proved this.

The then two year old x1900 ATi card ran better than the then new 8800 nVidia card. But aside from that, the GPU is not the most important part of a computer when running maya. No rendering gets passed off to the GPU it is the CPU that takes the brunt of the work in maya - ust open your resources manager and see. a 4 core machine renders 4 times quicker than a single core. By your logic a 4 card machine would render 4 times quicker than a single card machine which is obviously not true.

the amount of Video card RAM is immensly important. The more the better, if you do any modern visual effects work you must surely know this? :confused: How else are you buffering those particles, fluids and textures??

The ideal system for me at the moment (if it has to be mac) would be the 8 core 3.0Ghz system with a 3870 ATi card and about 8GB of RAM.

PS - you don't happen to work for nVidia do you?

stormtroopar
Feb 4, 2009, 01:28 PM
Sorry i just don't agree with what you're saying. nVidia do NOT have better OpenGL drivers than ATI. Barefeats have proved this.

The then two year old x1900 ATi card ran better than the then new 8800 nVidia card. But aside from that, the GPU is not the most important part of a computer when running maya. No rendering gets passed off to the GPU it is the CPU that takes the brunt of the work in maya - ust open your resources manager and see. a 4 core machine renders 4 times quicker than a single core. By your logic a 4 card machine would render 4 times quicker than a single card machine which is obviously not true.

the amount of Video card RAM is immensly important. The more the better, if you do any modern visual effects work you must surely know this? :confused: How else are you buffering those particles, fluids and textures??

The ideal system for me at the moment (if it has to be mac) would be the 8 core 3.0Ghz system with a 3870 ATi card and about 8GB of RAM.

PS - you don't happen to work for nVidia do you?

Sorry, let me clear up a few things... What I was refering to the ability of using maya in the new mac notebooks (if you had read what the thread and subject is about you would know what we were talking about, we were NOT talking the ultimate / ideal setup for running Maya).

The typical problem people have with buying Mac notebooks and running maya is the gfx card. Even an old macbook will render fine, the cpu is not typically the issue with compatibility.

Thats what I meant being the gfx card more important than the cpu. Not the cpu is not important. Most modern notebook CPU can run Maya fine. But usually the gfx card is what prevents Maya from running smoothly or without display glitches.

We were talking about notebook so I already assume this is for portable use, not full blown production usage... I wouldn't suggest using any notebook for real work. If someone wanted to do a big fluid sim or use a notebook for intense rendering, then I would tell them to forget about it, we were talking within the bounds for portable notebooks. I never mention anything about doing rendering or fluid sim specifically in my post. I am talking about general interaction and usage within the viewport. Any CPU will render fine, you are not going to find a notebook that can't render for you, but you will find notebook that can't run your maya session because of the gfx card it has.. That is really what I meant. If someone wants to get a notebook as a desktop replacement, then that is a different story and I didn't think that was the point of the post.. The original post asked about the "macbook"! I wouldn't recommend it anyway if they were doing complex 3d work with it.

So for the most part I agree with you, except the ATI video card running better than Nvidia. I have never used an ATI video card that ran more stable and faster than an nvidia video card in doing opengl 3d work. Specifically in maya. I haven't used the latest video cards from ATI so that I don't know. But I have always ran into glitches and display issues with ATI cards running maya and its even worse on OSX. Thats my experience, I would be happy if it was like you said, ATI worked just as well or better than Nvidia cards in running these opengl apps and I would love to be proved wrong. But in my experience, nvidia, even their pretty low end cards will run Maya more stable with less glitches than ATI cards.

I was just setting up a 43k poly character on my new Macbook Air and even to my surprise, it ran fine, painting worked solid and good, the character animated in real time... For what the macbook air is, I am really impressed.

P.S. Particles and Fluid sims don't necessary get buffer from the video card ram. If you were using the same video card, one has 512mb and one has 1gb and you were running the same particle simulations, would you see the bigger ram video card run faster or can run more particles in the scene, no. Most particles / sims in most 3d apps still don't take a lot of advantage of GPUs unfortunately.. If you had more ram in the machine and a 64bit OS, then yes. I have seen that. Textures, typically yes, they do use the video card ram a lot, and hence why I said if someone were doing heavy 3d work, heavy models and textures, the extra video card ram will make a more significant difference.

P.P.S. You don't happen to work for ATI right?

fluidedge
Feb 4, 2009, 02:17 PM
Sorry, let me clear up a few things... What I was refering to the ability of using maya in the new mac notebooks (if you had read what the thread and subject is about you would know what we were talking about, we were NOT talking the ultimate / ideal setup for running Maya).

The typical problem people have with buying Mac notebooks and running maya is the gfx card. Even an old macbook will render fine, the cpu is not typically the issue with compatibility.

Thats what I meant being the gfx card more important than the cpu. Not the cpu is not important. Most modern notebook CPU can run Maya fine. But usually the gfx card is what prevents Maya from running smoothly or without display glitches.

We were talking about notebook so I already assume this is for portable use, not full blown production usage... I wouldn't suggest using any notebook for real work. If someone wanted to do a big fluid sim or use a notebook for intense rendering, then I would tell them to forget about it, we were talking within the bounds for portable notebooks. I never mention anything about doing rendering or fluid sim specifically in my post. I am talking about general interaction and usage within the viewport. Any CPU will render fine, you are not going to find a notebook that can't render for you, but you will find notebook that can't run your maya session because of the gfx card it has.. That is really what I meant. If someone wants to get a notebook as a desktop replacement, then that is a different story and I didn't think that was the point of the post.. The original post asked about the "macbook"! I wouldn't recommend it anyway if they were doing complex 3d work with it.

So for the most part I agree with you, except the ATI video card running better than Nvidia. I have never used an ATI video card that ran more stable and faster than an nvidia video card in doing opengl 3d work. Specifically in maya. I haven't used the latest video cards from ATI so that I don't know. But I have always ran into glitches and display issues with ATI cards running maya and its even worse on OSX. Thats my experience, I would be happy if it was like you said, ATI worked just as well or better than Nvidia cards in running these opengl apps and I would love to be proved wrong. But in my experience, nvidia, even their pretty low end cards will run Maya more stable with less glitches than ATI cards.

I was just setting up a 43k poly character on my new Macbook Air and even to my surprise, it ran fine, painting worked solid and good, the character animated in real time... For what the macbook air is, I am really impressed.

P.S. Particles and Fluid sims don't necessary get buffer from the video card ram. If you were using the same video card, one has 512mb and one has 1gb and you were running the same particle simulations, would you see the bigger ram video card run faster or can run more particles in the scene, no. Most particles / sims in most 3d apps still don't take a lot of advantage of GPUs unfortunately.. If you had more ram in the machine and a 64bit OS, then yes. I have seen that. Textures, typically yes, they do use the video card ram a lot, and hence why I said if someone were doing heavy 3d work, heavy models and textures, the extra video card ram will make a more significant difference.

P.P.S. You don't happen to work for ATI right?

Touche!

:)

waffle911
Feb 4, 2009, 07:51 PM
Read the following Maya Spec Sheet for supported graphics.

http://download.autodesk.com/us/maya/qualcharts/Maya_OSX_2008.htm

Note that the built in intel graphic chip is NOT SUPPORTED.

Where have you been? MacBooks no longer feature an Intel IGP. It's an Nvidia chip now, and it flies (Intel can't make IGP's for their lives).

fluidedge
Feb 5, 2009, 12:07 PM
Where have you been? MacBooks no longer feature an Intel IGP. It's an Nvidia chip now, and it flies (Intel can't make IGP's for their lives).

please read the start date of the thread!

waffle911
Feb 8, 2009, 08:12 PM
please read the start date of the thread!
Wow, do I feel silly now. I didn't even see the date gap in the posts... just thought that with recent commentary that it was a recently started thread. Just saw "February" and read on, never mind the rest of the date.