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View Full Version : Replacing Internal Airport Card on Alum Powerbook?




Earendil
Apr 30, 2008, 03:27 AM
First off, is this even possible? I can't figure out if my internal wireless "card" is a removable piece like it was on the iBooks of the same generation. I know that wireless G was standard on the Alum Powerbooks, but does that mean it was soldered in somehow? When I replaced my HD last year I don't recall seeing one...

If it wasn't soldered, and it's a replaceable card, does anyone make a compatible N card that I can drop in it's place? Times are changing and both my house and my work will have N routers, and I would like to take advantage.

Any and all help is appreciated!

~Tyler



tersono
Apr 30, 2008, 03:47 AM
It IS a slot-in card on the G4 powerbooks, but the old-style Airport extreme card hasn't been updated to support 802.11n and it's a proprietary slot, so third party products won't help.

You can, however, put a wireless card in the external PCMCIA slot, which isn't quite as elegant, but should work just fine. Just make sure that there are Mac drivers available before you buy.

windowpain
May 1, 2008, 02:08 AM
Is this the kind of thing you are looking for?

http://quickertek.com/products/nquicky_cardbus.php

Do you have the 12inch or the 15inch powerbook?

I don't think the 12inch has a PC card slot..so you might be out of luck.
I don't know of any internal ones, sorry.

Earendil
May 1, 2008, 01:03 PM
Thank you both for replying.

I do have a 15" Powerbook (rest of stats in my sig).

I was looking for a replacement for my internal card, as that keeps anything from sticking out of my computer. My computer spends half it's time away from my desk, and in a bag. The thought of something sticking out of the side kind of alarms me.
However, if this is the only way to go, perhaps it will work.

Is anyone familiar with how well these things set themselves up? For example, could I just leave the N card on my desk where I use the N network, and just insert/remove everytime I bring the laptop to the desk?
If there is a setup process every time you insert the card than this would not be ideal...

But thanks for the replies, now I know what my upgrade path looks like!

~Tyler

tdhurst
May 1, 2008, 03:11 PM
What gains are you expecting from an 'N' card? Unless you're routinely sending huge files over your network, an 'N' won't improve much of anything.

It will increase range, but only if you have an 'N' router as well.

Earendil
May 1, 2008, 04:10 PM
What gains are you expecting from an 'N' card? Unless you're routinely sending huge files over your network, an 'N' won't improve much of anything.

It will increase range, but only if you have an 'N' router as well.

Between my software engineering internship, and the 5 other people in my house next year, I'm pretty sure I can get close to maxing an N router ;-)
Oh, and my house mates like my iTunes library more than their own, so...
Thanks for the concern though.

Besides, my room is two walls and a story away from where the router has to go, so I'm okay with having a littler more range/power to get a good signal to where I'll be using my computer most of the time.

Of course what I'd really like is a new Macbook Pro...
That would solve the N-Card problem... ;-)

tdhurst
May 1, 2008, 04:12 PM
Between my software engineering internship, and the 5 other people in my house next year, I'm pretty sure I can get close to maxing an N router ;-)
Oh, and my house mates like my iTunes library more than their own, so...
Thanks for the concern though.

Besides, my room is two walls and a story away from where the router has to go, so I'm okay with having a littler more range/power to get a good signal to where I'll be using my computer most of the time.

Of course what I'd really like is a new Macbook Pro...
That would solve the N-Card problem... ;-)

All good points. You can get a PMCIA card and insert it when you're at your desk and turn off airport.

I know there's a few with Mac drivers, but an external card is your only option.