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View Full Version : My mom has a copy of iWork, could I install it on my iMac?




whaaat
May 22, 2008, 09:11 AM
Is it possible to install it on two computers?

Thanks for the help in advance :)



richardsim7
May 22, 2008, 09:15 AM
Yes but it violates Apple's EULA ;)

-Rich-

flopticalcube
May 22, 2008, 09:16 AM
Its technically possible. Its against the license agreement unless its a family license.

AdeFowler
May 22, 2008, 09:17 AM
Legally, no (unless it's a Family Pack). Technically, yes but you shouldn't.

squeeks
May 22, 2008, 09:30 AM
just do it, you own the software, you should be able to install it on any personal computer you own

mrcourt123
May 22, 2008, 09:54 AM
If I buy a CD I can play it in my CD player or my mom's car.
If I buy a DVD I can play it on my DVD player or on my best friend's computer.
If I buy a new video game I can use it in my Wii or my nieghbor's Wii.
If I buy iLife (or iWork) I can ONLY use it on my computer? I can't use it on my wife's computer that I also use? What sense does that make?

I'm not saying what I have or haven't done with Apple software in the past, I'm just saying the idea of only installing it on one computer doesn't make any sense to me whatsoever...

flopticalcube
May 22, 2008, 10:02 AM
If I buy a CD I can play it in my CD player or my mom's car.
If I buy a DVD I can play it on my DVD player or on my best friend's computer.
If I buy a new video game I can use it in my Wii or my nieghbor's Wii.
If I buy iLife (or iWork) I can ONLY use it on my computer? I can't use it on my wife's computer that I also use? What sense does that make?

I'm not saying what I have or haven't done with Apple software in the past, I'm just saying the idea of only installing it on one computer doesn't make any sense to me whatsoever...

It might not make sense to you but its what you agreed to when you installed the software. The other analogies are irrelevant as you still can use a CD or video game only 1 at a time but if you install software on a computer, you can use it simultaneously.

Its actually not your software. You bought a license to use it. Its up to you whether to abide by the terms of the license. Nobody will come around to your house and break your kneecaps if you don't, however.

whaaat
May 22, 2008, 10:06 AM
Thanks guys! :D

leodavinci0
May 22, 2008, 10:21 AM
just do it, you own the software, you should be able to install it on any personal computer you own

I second that, and the advise about not drinking around a laptop.

It's nice that iWork doesn't have that "feature" that Micorsoft Office has where you can't run Word on two computers on the same network if they are single license versions.

mrcourt123
May 22, 2008, 10:38 AM
Flop...

Correct me if I'm wrong, but when I purchase a CD, or the digital download from iTunes or wherever, isn't it mine? I can play it on my computer and make as many copies on CD as I want, then play them in all of MY CD players at the same time. Can I make 2 copies of a CD (which is perfectly legal) and play one copy in my CD player and one in my grandma's CD player at the same time? I believe I am alowed to make digital back-ups of DVDs as well. Can I not legally rip a DVD to my computer and watch it on my computer AND my original copy on my cousin's DVD player that he brought over my house at the same time? I understand you MUST agree to install the software on a single computer only. If you don't at least say you agree you don't get to install it! I just feel like that is an unreasonable expectation. Why should we bow down to a multi-billion dollar company like that? I mean, to be honest, Apple makes it way too easy to install their single-use software on multiple machines. Again, I'm not saying what I have or have not done in the past. I am a very honest person, I am just pointing out what I feel to be a very unfortunate, but calculated, flaw.

flopticalcube
May 22, 2008, 11:08 AM
The problem is where do you stop. What is "fair use" for software? Do you take your copy of iWork and install it on a friends machine, maybe charging a few bucks for the process? How about the neighbors? They want a copy and you have one.

Every time someone does this its just one small step closer to MS-style activation. None of us wants that.

I really have no problems with people keeping it "in the family" just as long as it doesn't get out of hand.

CanadaRAM
May 22, 2008, 11:24 AM
Why should we bow down to a multi-billion dollar company like that?

Because it is what you agreed to do when you first installed the software. Use it on one computer only. You can move it to another if you de-install it from the first.

re "bow down" - If you don't like the terms of the agreement, you are free to not use the software and buy a different package with an agreement you like better. It's not 'bowing down', it is entering into a commercial agreement. Just like when you pay $9 for a movie ticket, you can't bring your grandma and your cousin along to sit in your lap and see Indiana JOnes - they each have to buy their own ticket.

Astral Cars
May 22, 2008, 01:30 PM
Out of curiosity, if I buy a copy of some software, say Office 08 or iWork, am I allowed to install it on two computers that I own and that are only mine? I don't currently, but say I have a laptop and a desktop, shouldn't I be able to install software on both of them without paying twice?

CanadaRAM
May 22, 2008, 01:38 PM
Out of curiosity, if I buy a copy of some software, say Office 08 or iWork, am I allowed to install it on two computers that I own and that are only mine? I don't currently, but say I have a laptop and a desktop, shouldn't I be able to install software on both of them without paying twice?

Again, it depends on the wording of your license agreement.

In general, Apple does not permit installation on more than one machine no matter who the owner.

In general, SOME Microsoft applications allow installation on a desktop and a laptop owned by the same person, with the provision that they are never used simultaneously.

But read the license for your specific software.

SilentPanda
May 22, 2008, 01:58 PM
Out of curiosity, if I buy a copy of some software, say Office 08 or iWork, am I allowed to install it on two computers that I own and that are only mine? I don't currently, but say I have a laptop and a desktop, shouldn't I be able to install software on both of them without paying twice?

For iWork you can't per the agreement. Some programs you can though. I know for 1Password you can install it on multiple machines that are yours which is nice of them. I wish you could with iWork though. I didn't buy the family pack because it's just me and I have a desktop where I do all my presentation development on and then my laptop which I usually use to show my presentation. Fortunately the trial version of iWork lets you do everything except save and print after the 30 days so I can use the trial version for presentations. It does on occasion suck when a client asks for a printout of the presentation and I can't do it but I've learned to print to PDF on my desktop and bring that on my laptop as well.

I personally think you should be able to install the software on multiple machines you are essentially the sole user of but that's up to the developer and not up to me.

Extreme Red
May 22, 2008, 02:10 PM
I know this is my first post - I've been reading this forum for some time (waiting for the updated mac mini to use as a HTPC) - however, the opinions posted in this thread are infuriating.

Do you realise that you can pay $20 more (in Canada) for a family pack and then you can install it on up to 5 computers in one household.

Apple has the most reasonabley priced software on the market (especially compared to MS) and they have put in place a very reasonable mechanism for those who need/want to use their software on multiple computers.

It has been said before the rational is that without purchasing the family packyou are purchasing the software for single use (putting it on multiple computers enables to user to be using the software simutaneously).


Yes you can copy CDs (as backup), but not so you can be listening to them at the same time. The same is true for DVDs. Even with books you can't photocopy and "share" its contents.

This is how the vast majority of software is licensed (at least to the consumer market), and if you think it is unreasonable don't buy/use the software, send emails to Apple, picket their offices if you must.

I understand that many people don't respect copyrights or the time/money that is invested in creating new products, however, you need to understand that having these protections in place is fundamental to driving innovation.

By breaking a copyright/law (I know you won't be going to jail any time soon for this), it is a slippery slope from a corporate perspective. Instead of paying $20 more for the family pack don't be surprised to see MS style validation in future versions if this becomes common practice or higher prices in the first place as they assume everyone will install it on multiple computers.

With choice comes responsiblity.

balamw
May 22, 2008, 02:14 PM
Do you realise that you can pay $20 more (in Canada) for a family pack and then you can install it on up to 5 computers in one household.
QFT. Apple's policy on additional licenses in the same household is exemplary. It just would be nice if you could "upgrade" your single license to a family pack afte r the fact.

B

PlaceofDis
May 22, 2008, 02:23 PM
QFT. Apple's policy on additional licenses in the same household is exemplary. It just would be nice if you could "upgrade" your single license to a family pack afte r the fact.

B

i can agree to that. be nice it put that in somewhere.... hmmm off to find the comments/feedback page now.

RaceTripper
May 22, 2008, 02:35 PM
If I buy iLife (or iWork) I can ONLY use it on my computer? I can't use it on my wife's computer that I also use? What sense does that make?Some EULAs allow installing software on a desktop and a laptop, as long as only one copy is in use at any time. MS Office is like that (or at least the WIndows version used to be).

leodavinci0
May 22, 2008, 02:45 PM
I know this is my first post - I've been reading this forum for some time (waiting for the updated mac mini to use as a HTPC) - however, the opinions posted in this thread are infuriating.

Do you realise that you can pay $20 more (in Canada) for a family pack and then you can install it on up to 5 computers in one household.

Apple has the most reasonabley priced software on the market (especially compared to MS) and they have put in place a very reasonable mechanism for those who need/want to use their software on multiple computers.

It has been said before the rational is that without purchasing the family packyou are purchasing the software for single use (putting it on multiple computers enables to user to be using the software simutaneously).


Yes you can copy CDs (as backup), but not so you can be listening to them at the same time. The same is true for DVDs. Even with books you can't photocopy and "share" its contents.

This is how the vast majority of software is licensed (at least to the consumer market), and if you think it is unreasonable don't buy/use the software, send emails to Apple, picket their offices if you must.

I understand that many people don't respect copyrights or the time/money that is invested in creating new products, however, you need to understand that having these protections in place is fundamental to driving innovation.

By breaking a copyright/law (I know you won't be going to jail any time soon for this), it is a slippery slope from a corporate perspective. Instead of paying $20 more for the family pack don't be surprised to see MS style validation in future versions if this becomes common practice or higher prices in the first place as they assume everyone will install it on multiple computers.

With choice comes responsiblity.

You're right, I know. I just care to forget it at the opportune time. Shame on me.

RaceTripper
May 22, 2008, 02:50 PM
My take on this is, not to be a cheap ass and pay the (not so much) extra money for another license or a family pack if you need it.

The alternative is to have overpriced, bloated, buggy application and OS software with broken, draconian copyright protection schemes, like we have in the Windows world.

Jon.Stewart87
May 22, 2008, 02:54 PM
I just think iWork needs to take the outlook that Office 2008 Home/Family pack has.

Office - up to 3 computers. enough said.


I'll probably purchase Office for the compatability and the fact that my parents and brother can also upgrade.. its a win win for the money.

balamw
May 22, 2008, 03:28 PM
Office - up to 3 computers. enough said.

iWork '08 Family Pack is:


$50 less ($99 vs. $149)
can be installed on 5 Macs (2 more than Office)
Has no restrictions for non-commercial uses


B

aaquib
May 22, 2008, 03:41 PM
Relax, just do it. Your mom paid $79 for the license. You do know that you're not supposed to let anyone else listen to CD'S you paid for? Just do it. You know you can :D

Astral Cars
May 22, 2008, 09:47 PM
Apple has the most reasonabley priced software on the market (especially compared to MS) and they have put in place a very reasonable mechanism for those who need/want to use their software on multiple computers.

Yes you can copy CDs (as backup), but not so you can be listening to them at the same time. The same is true for DVDs. Even with books you can't photocopy and "share" its contents.


My problem is that I should be able to install software on two computers that I own and I am the sole user of. I don't care if the price to do this is reasonable or not; there should be no price difference between this and buying it for one computer.

I know the CD analogy is somewhat flawed, but I can play a CD in the CD player in my room, or the one in my car, or somewhere else. Software should not be tied to hardware, it should be tied to people (if tied to anything).

flopticalcube
May 23, 2008, 11:06 AM
My problem is that I should be able to install software on two computers that I own and I am the sole user of. I don't care if the price to do this is reasonable or not; there should be no price difference between this and buying it for one computer.

I know the CD analogy is somewhat flawed, but I can play a CD in the CD player in my room, or the one in my car, or somewhere else. Software should not be tied to hardware, it should be tied to people (if tied to anything).

You are allowed to do this. Simply uninstall the software from the machine you are not using it on. Just because you think you should be able to use it does not make it your right to use it. Having said that, I am sure Apple knows that people will do this to a reasonable degree and that is why, to date, they haven't used any sort of activation method.

The problem with the CD analogy is that you are not installing anything with a CD or DVD. With software you are actually making a copy of the disk contents onto your hard drive. It is that action that the license agreement "prohibits" you from doing more than once at any one time.

Astral Cars
May 23, 2008, 01:10 PM
You are allowed to do this. Simply uninstall the software from the machine you are not using it on. Just because you think you should be able to use it does not make it your right to use it. Having said that, I am sure Apple knows that people will do this to a reasonable degree and that is why, to date, they haven't used any sort of activation method.

The problem with the CD analogy is that you are not installing anything with a CD or DVD. With software you are actually making a copy of the disk contents onto your hard drive. It is that action that the license agreement "prohibits" you from doing more than once at any one time.

Okay, so what if I have two computers that are mine and only mine and I want to rip a CD onto both of them? That's acceptable, right?

flopticalcube
May 23, 2008, 03:04 PM
Okay, so what if I have two computers that are mine and only mine and I want to rip a CD onto both of them? That's acceptable, right?

As long as there is no license agreement which says to the contrary, I would consider that to be fair use. Like I said, Apple probably knows that some people will be doing this and doesn't really care, therefore there is no activation. Its when it gets out of hand that the problems arise and that's the problem with posts that say "its your software, you can do anything you want with it" because it quickly degenerates into "I purchased a copy of Leopard, can I lend the disk to 35 friends so they can install it too?"

Psychmike
Jul 6, 2009, 12:16 AM
You are allowed to do this. Simply uninstall the software from the machine you are not using it on. Just because you think you should be able to use it does not make it your right to use it. Having said that, I am sure Apple knows that people will do this to a reasonable degree and that is why, to date, they haven't used any sort of activation method.

The problem with the CD analogy is that you are not installing anything with a CD or DVD. With software you are actually making a copy of the disk contents onto your hard drive. It is that action that the license agreement "prohibits" you from doing more than once at any one time.

I'd like to venture a little off topic and talk about software EULA's generally. This isn't a comment on Apple specifically.

I applaud your ethics but for me there are larger moral issues at stake. Many software and music companies have attempted to apply draconian licensing agreements that fly in the face of centuries of common law that have defined fair usage. This includes attempting to circumvent the doctrine of first sale through EULAs. Some major companies' spokespeople have said that they believe you should have to buy a separate copy for each device you own. Many companies are now requiring users to pay an ongoing licensing fee lest the software you already own be deactivated.

One could say that I should only use software if I agree to the EULA but my view is that a contract is only enforceable if it is legal. Legality isn't just defined by what's on paper. It's defined by the legislature and the judiciary.

I'm not trying to pick nits. Whereas perhaps people were most concerned about governmental restriction on individual rights a few centuries ago, these days, many people are concerned with corporate intrusion into human freedom.