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Sunnzy
Jun 4, 2008, 05:34 AM
I heard that OS X Server can be run on virtual machines since Leopard, is that true or not?

If so, what virtual machine app can one actually use to run OS X Server on it? I looked at VMware Fusion and they don't mention anything like that!!



robbieduncan
Jun 4, 2008, 05:41 AM
I heard that OS X Server can be run on virtual machines since Leopard, is that true or not?

If so, what virtual machine app can one actually use to run OS X Server on it? I looked at VMware Fusion and they don't mention anything like that!!

The OSX Server EULA for Leopard does allow virtualisation, but only on Apple branded hardware. So you still cannot run an OSX virtual instance on Dell servers for example. Parallels are working towards enabling this (http://parallelsvirtualization.blogspot.com/2008/01/parallels-server-open-beta-launches.html).

Sunnzy
Jun 4, 2008, 05:58 AM
VMware Fusion is like Parallel, it is a Mac app, which only runs on OS X which only runs on Apple hardware... unless you use OSX86... but then Parallel can also run on OSX86...

At any rate, in theory the VMware Fusion guys can also do it like the Parallel guys right?

pezza
Jun 4, 2008, 09:23 AM
Parallels Server for Mac will enable you to virtualise Mac OSX Server, and give you the option of running Mac Server, Windows and Linux VM's, has 64 bit support, and lets you assign processors to the VM's, should be released within the next few weeks.

A beta is available for free download from www.parallels.com

MacsRgr8
Jun 4, 2008, 02:44 PM
EXCELLENT!!!

I have been trying the previous beta, and every time you get the "OS X virtualization will be available in the next build..."

Downloading now.

Cheers for the heads up, pezza :)

ert3
Jun 4, 2008, 02:47 PM
Personally I hate virtualizing things like servers.

A trick my admin figured out was to use a virtual desktop client to dial into a windows server so we could run Cold Fusion through our linux servers.
:cool:

exabytes18
Jun 5, 2008, 01:14 AM
I don't have access to any servers so I'm kind of a noob. VMWare(company) Fusion(product) is in fact a Mac App. It's meant for desktop environments only. VMWare does write software targeted at servers and datacenters... maybe that's what you want to look into.

Sunnzy
Jun 5, 2008, 01:39 AM
Yes I know Fusion is a desktop app... but there are uses for a desktop app to run server stuff.

E.g. I might use a VM on my laptop as a testbed before I update the new configuration on the real server, of course the real server could as well be virtualised, but it is a production server.

Just like you don't necessarily have to use a server exclusively for develop server software, it is fine to use your own laptop to write some code, make sure it is compiles fine, then do real testing on a testing server.

And of course, servers are a relative term. Not all server are that much powerful... some small one's have way less power than a MacBook Pro anyway, so I don't see no reason why you can't test software/code/whatever in a VM on a MacBook Pro before you deploy it.

I have been doing this a lot with Linux and OpenBSD servers already... you don't always need enterprise grade software with all the bells and whistle to do simple testing, sometimes simpler is better, less is more... the possibilities are endless...

gnasher729
Jun 6, 2008, 06:50 AM
I heard that OS X Server can be run on virtual machines since Leopard, is that true or not?

If so, what virtual machine app can one actually use to run OS X Server on it? I looked at VMware Fusion and they don't mention anything like that!!

Since Leopard, Apple allows you to allow multiple copies of OS X Server on any number of virtual machines on one Apple-labeled computer. Apple doesn't actually supply the virtual machines; this permission just enables others to start developing VMs that run OS X Server.

gnasher729
Jun 6, 2008, 07:16 AM
Personally I hate virtualizing things like servers.

It's very useful. Take a MacPro, eight core, 16GB RAM, install XenServer, and then install 32 VMs running Linux. Even if one Linux crashes, 95% of all software is still running fine. And if different customers need different Linux versions for compatibility reason, you can do just that.

Sunnzy
Jun 6, 2008, 08:01 AM
Oh you can actually run as many copies of OS X Server as you need/can on one Mac? That's very nice!!

It's very useful. Take a MacPro, eight core, 16GB RAM, install XenServer, and then install 32 VMs running Linux. Even if one Linux crashes, 95% of all software is still running fine. And if different customers need different Linux versions for compatibility reason, you can do just that.

There are also application centric use it VM as well, say you want to host an application server that is only available on Windows, you can you it in a VM, and if that gets hacked, the rest of the system is still up.

robbieduncan
Jun 6, 2008, 08:03 AM
Oh you can actually run as many copies of OS X Server as you need/can on one Mac? That's very nice!!

Yes, but remember you need a license for each instance: buying one copy of OSX Server does not legally allow you to run more than 1 instance. So if you have OSX Server hosting 10 virtual OSX Server instances you need 11 licenses.

Sunnzy
Jun 6, 2008, 10:06 AM
Ohh... I thought it was meant one license per Mac... it sounds too good to be true I guess when it comes to Apple. :p

gnasher729
Jun 6, 2008, 11:37 AM
Yes, but remember you need a license for each instance: buying one copy of OSX Server does not legally allow you to run more than 1 instance. So if you have OSX Server hosting 10 virtual OSX Server instances you need 11 licenses.

Are you sure about that? I thought that was the point of an Apple license change: That you can install it into VMs. After all, these ten virtual OS X Server instances run on a machine that is only one tenth as powerful. They don't do actually more work than a single instance installed on its own, they just have other advantages like more security, or being able to use different versions simultaneously.

robbieduncan
Jun 7, 2008, 03:46 AM
Are you sure about that? I thought that was the point of an Apple license change: That you can install it into VMs. After all, these ten virtual OS X Server instances run on a machine that is only one tenth as powerful. They don't do actually more work than a single instance installed on its own, they just have other advantages like more security, or being able to use different versions simultaneously.

This is what the license says

"This License allows you to install and use one copy of the Mac OS X Server software (the "Mac OS X Server Software") on a single Apple-labeled computer. You may also install and use other copies of Mac OS X Server Software on the same Apple-labeled computer, provided that you acquire an individual and valid license from Apple for each of these other copies of Mac OS X Server Software."

It's pretty clear you need multiple licenses.