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Carbonic
Jul 24, 2008, 02:15 PM
Hey all, I'm trying to make a resume like the one I'm going to post. I really like the style of it, and wanted to do something like that, but I'm not sure what program to make a resume in, and a program that will allow me to create a resume like this one.

I basically would want to add my own header/image/company info where he has his, and add a few more things. not looking to copy it, but i like the setup this person is using.

any help would be great. thanks!



heehee
Jul 24, 2008, 02:29 PM
Probably used illustrator and/or indesign.

NC MacGuy
Jul 24, 2008, 02:35 PM
For the life of me, don't know why you'd want something like that. Personally don't like it one bit and as an employer, it'd go quickly into the circular file but to each his own.

shecky
Jul 24, 2008, 02:41 PM
speaking as the principal of a design studio, if i received a cv that looked like that from a prospective employee, the first thing i would do is throw it away.

bntz313
Jul 24, 2008, 05:16 PM
speaking as the principal of a design studio, if i received a cv that looked like that from a prospective employee, the first thing i would do is throw it away.

What do you like to see an resume look like than, as I'm trying to revise mine.

CalPoly10
Jul 24, 2008, 05:41 PM
Here's mine...basic and works.

shecky
Jul 24, 2008, 06:03 PM
What do you like to see an resume look like than, as I'm trying to revise mine.

extremely clear and legible with perfect typography, properly ordered information, very well considered hierarchy, and no cheesy gimmicks/illustrations/distractions. as far as i am concerned things like that try and detract from what is almost always an inferior candidate.

benwa02
Jul 24, 2008, 06:37 PM
Here's mine...basic and works.

and one can tell your not a designer.

kitki83
Jul 24, 2008, 08:57 PM
I notice a trend in the resume layout where its a combination of paragraph block with bullet points.

I would recommend looking up sites for tips. Also I heard write your resume at a six grade level because its easier for employer to get everything about you.

Just my question to those who do the hiring, is it worse to have right column with your skills? Seems distracting to me (see example below)

http://www.skycorbett.com/wp-content/uploads/2007/11/skyler_pdfresume.jpg
Examples
http://www.davebailey.us/resume.gif
http://www.juliebetters.com/images/resume.jpg

shecky
Jul 24, 2008, 09:24 PM
do no list skills on a resume for creative positions. it will be obvious from your portfolio and what position you are applying for what skills you have. if you are applying for a motion graphics job, it will be assumed you know how to use after effects, if you are applying for print work, it will be assumed you know indesign, etc..

ktbubster
Jul 26, 2008, 04:36 AM
That's not always true. A lot of my professors have told us to have a skills section and I'm in product design. Not all creative positions are like that... since ID specifically is trained in a variety of software, maybe CAD or Solidworks or 3D studio max or even Rhino etc... so it's not always obviously what programs you know... also tools in modeling or if you have soft goods experience. Even in other creative fields like sculpture and painting... it's not always clear what you have experience in.. and as a graphic designer even.. some places use corel or a variety of other software outside adobe.... and other skills can sometimes help you land a job. I just had a phone interview (real interview is next week :) ) with a company who specifically was interested in me because of the variety of skills listed and the mutli-faceted background I had....

List your skills. They will matter.

AppleMatt
Jul 26, 2008, 05:30 AM
Im not a designer but personally, I can't stand seeing free email addresses on anything worthwhile. You see excellent layout, excellent experience/qualifications and then are expected to contact 'bobbyrules1984@hotmail.com'

edit: To Carbonic. I'd suggest changing the order of your personal statement. The first paragraph can describe many hundreds of applicants such as yourself. Why not try a paragraph that describes the benefits you have to offer that others do not?

Secondly, your CV states "almost 10" years using computers but your website states "almost 12". Also, you have jumbled up your tenses on that page of the site too. Sort it!

AppleMatt

dukebound85
Jul 26, 2008, 05:57 AM
i wouldnt include your elementary school or birth date

fallingman
Jul 27, 2008, 04:38 PM
i have to agree with the free email address thing ... it just looks really cheap these days .. you should really have your own domain ... but then again i do websites so i might be biased

NC MacGuy
Jul 27, 2008, 05:13 PM
i have to agree with the free email address thing ... it just looks really cheap these days .. you should really have your own domain ... but then again i do websites so i might be biased

I agree.

Free email and user name, too should be scrapped. I wouldn't list bobbyrules1984 as an email address. Rjackson@xx.com is an example of a replacement. First initial, last name as user and paid acct. by a legit provider as domain. Just an opinion.

Carbonic
Jul 28, 2008, 08:08 PM
Okay well my topic has changed to a more personal opinion than an answer to my question.

Someone mentioned that I could make something like that in Illustrator, how would I go about and do that? I haven't messed with Illustrator in awhile, so it might take some time for me to learn it again, and what size do I set it at when I start a new project?

snickelfritz
Jul 29, 2008, 01:23 AM
IMO, you should create the document using InDesign, Quark or MS Word.
Illustrator is more appropriate for illustrations and logos, and lacks the advanced paragraph and character controls that are the bread 'n' butter for apps like InDesign.

Keep it simple.
Empty white space is just as important as the content; balance the two.
Use a "normal" 12pt font like Times or Helvetica; let the content do the talking.
BTW, I agree with the sentiments regarding freebee hotmail addresses; kinda tacky.

bntz313
Jul 29, 2008, 03:15 PM
About the free email, What if you can't afford an paid email? or a domain?

IgnatiusTheKing
Jul 29, 2008, 03:51 PM
Here's mine...basic and works.

Why is it two pages and why is the entire second page blank?

Okay well my topic has changed to a more personal opinion than an answer to my question.

Someone mentioned that I could make something like that in Illustrator, how would I go about and do that? I haven't messed with Illustrator in awhile, so it might take some time for me to learn it again, and what size do I set it at when I start a new project?

If you really want to do something like that, create the header in Illustrator. Make it no larger than 8.25" wide. Then lay out all the other text in InDesign and place the header.

design-is
Jul 30, 2008, 09:03 AM
what size do I set it at when I start a new project?

This really depends on where your from...

US use letter sized paper. A whole lot of the rest of the world use A4.

Info here (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paper_size)

If its just the size of the header your asking, that's really up to your own personal tastes. Or if you want to copy the one you have shown as example, print & measure or drag it into illustrator. Though copying is a bit low.

pinktank
Aug 4, 2008, 09:28 AM
your resume is meant to be read, you can show your more extravagant design skills in your portfolio, although an entirely different set of skills, it isnt necessarily easy to deal with such typography