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View Full Version : Spirit on Mars!


Doctor Q
Jan 4, 2004, 01:07 AM
JPL link (http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/index.html)NASA's Deep Space Network has received a signal confirming that Mars Exploration Rover Spirit is alive after rolling to a stop on the surface of Mars.The photos will be coming down any time now. I'm excited!

Note the great URL for the mission description: marsrovers.jpl.nasa.gov/spotlight/rocknroll01.html (http://marsrovers.jpl.nasa.gov/spotlight/rocknroll01.html)

Awimoway
Jan 4, 2004, 01:29 AM
Woohoo! :)

I'm watcing on the NASA channel. Fun stuff. I feel really sorry for the Brits' Beagle 2. That must have seemed a bad omen for the superstitious at JPL. Watching these guys, I it's like watching big stakes gamblers with immense patience. They dedicate years of their lives to something that can SNAFU in a second.

Waluigi
Jan 4, 2004, 01:31 AM
Great for NASA, great for everyone. Besides the great research they do, I hope they make an IMAX movie out of this trip to mars.

--Waluigi

latergator116
Jan 4, 2004, 01:33 AM
Awesome! to tell you the truth, I didn't think it was gonna make it. I can't wait to see pictures

Awimoway
Jan 4, 2004, 01:34 AM
Pictures! They're great! Wow!

(Okay, I'll knock off the play-by-play. But it's so exciting. It's working! :D )

Edit: They even have descent pix! And it landed near a heterogeneous rock formation! (OK. Now I'll really stop.)

latergator116
Jan 4, 2004, 01:37 AM
Originally posted by Awimoway
Pictures! They're great! Wow!

(Okay, I'll knock off the play-by-play. But it's so exciting. It's working! :D )

Edit: They even have descent pix! (OK. Now I'll really stop.)

Pictures!!!!.....Where are they??!!!

Awimoway
Jan 4, 2004, 01:39 AM
On NASA TV, which I get on Dish Network. But there's a link to watch the feed with Real Player here: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/mer/landing.cfm

I imagine the pix will probably be online soon, too. Perhaps here: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/mer/rover-images/jan-3-04/captions/spirit-celebration.cfm

alxths
Jan 4, 2004, 01:48 AM
Hehe, in that celebration pic... I think that one guy in the back had money on lander not working...

Awimoway
Jan 4, 2004, 01:50 AM
Originally posted by alxths
Hehe, in that celebration pic... I think that one guy in the back had money on lander not working...

:D Maybe he's from the Beagle 2 team.

Awimoway
Jan 4, 2004, 02:05 AM
Damn. The feed is over now. News briefing at 12:30 am Pacific, though.

Doctor Q
Jan 4, 2004, 02:45 AM
Spirit is not the only space success this weekend. The spacecraft "Stardust" has apparently been successful capturing some dust from comet "Wild-2" in a fly-by, using capturing material called "aerogel" to collect the particles. If all continues to go well, the craft will return to Earth in 2006 with its samples.

latergator116
Jan 4, 2004, 10:53 AM
Most of you have proably already seen theses, but here are the pics :http://cnn.netscape.cnn.com/news/default.jsp

They're great!

Macmaniac
Jan 4, 2004, 01:01 PM
Good news for NASA, they really need a success in these trying times, at least this Mars probe was not like the other ones that crashed! I hope it can find water, if it does I bet it would accelerate a move for humans to go to Mars:)

pseudobrit
Jan 4, 2004, 01:20 PM
Originally posted by Macmaniac
Good news for NASA, they really need a success in these trying times, at least this Mars probe was not like the other ones that crashed! I hope it can find water, if it does I bet it would accelerate a move for humans to go to Mars:)

Agreed. It's high time we got some butts on that rock.

JesseJames
Jan 4, 2004, 02:04 PM
HIP HIP HOORAY FOR GEEKDOM!!!
Seriously, this is way cool!

mactastic
Jan 4, 2004, 02:10 PM
:D

WinterMute
Jan 4, 2004, 02:30 PM
Any chance Spirit could look up Beagle, we seem to have lost it?

:( ;) :D

Dros
Jan 4, 2004, 02:52 PM
Anybody think they will find evidence of life of Mars, or that life once was there? When you read about the bizarre bacteria they are just discovering here on earth in deep rock, high heat, high radiation, etc, it does seem more probable.

krossfyter
Jan 4, 2004, 02:55 PM
this is going to be a stupid question but i dont give a damn.

whats the bid deal here?

hasnt nasa landed a rover on mars before?

or did that one wreck and this one made it?


okay i had to get that out of the way and i choose to do it here. im just not versed on nasa history... forgive me.


on another note... if they do find any type of life on mars (i know this is not the point of the mission anyways) it will not shake my faith at all.

mactastic
Jan 4, 2004, 03:06 PM
Well, say somebody was studying earth and landed a rover of some kind in the Mojave desert. You can't really extrapolate all the much about the rest of Earth from that, you need several surveys.

wdlove
Jan 4, 2004, 03:56 PM
Originally posted by krossfyter
this is going to be a stupid question but i dont give a damn.

whats the bid deal here?

hasnt nasa landed a rover on mars before?

or did that one wreck and this one made it?

on another note... if they do find any type of life on mars (i know this is not the point of the mission anyways) it will not shake my faith at all.

There are no stupid questions krossfyter.

Man has always been curious by nature. Looking into that next frontier. Space is now the next frontier and in particular Mars.

NASA landed Sojourner on Mars in 1997, it travels a distance of a football field during its 12 weeks of activity. Sadly NASA lost 2 other missions. Opportunity is due to land on Mars January 2th.

Awimoway
Jan 4, 2004, 04:03 PM
Originally posted by krossfyter
this is going to be a stupid question but i dont give a damn.

whats the bid deal here?

hasnt nasa landed a rover on mars before?

or did that one wreck and this one made it?


okay i had to get that out of the way and i choose to do it here. im just not versed on nasa history... forgive me.

No prob. It's a fair question. The thing is that, especially recently, unmanned science missions, particularly martian missions, have been having a very low success rate. Case in point was last week's tragedy of the unresponsive British craft, Beagle 2. I can't remember the exact number (63% of all stats are made up on the spot, anyway ;) ), but the success rate for martian missions is around 30%. So, yes, this is important. There's a lot we still don't know about Mars. We've seen evidence of ice, but we don't know how widespread it is. And if I'm not mistaken, the Spirit is going to bring back rock samples, something we haven't done before with Mars.

Remember last summer when Mars was closer to the earth than it had been in 60,000 years? That's when different science agencies launched a number of craft to Mars to perform different kinds of science missions. It was a window of oppurtunity.

jeff.macaddict
Jan 4, 2004, 04:06 PM
yeah, I've been to mars. It was okay.:p

krossfyter
Jan 4, 2004, 04:30 PM
ah okay... i see the deal now. thanks guys for answering my question.


well i too hope its a success.

when i first heard the report last night on Art Bell... i was like "Whats the big deal.. did they land a person on mars or what"? What a dumbass!!

mac15
Jan 4, 2004, 05:00 PM
Thats incredible, the pictures are just amazing. Now answer me this, they can send something to land on mars from a few hundred thousand miles away and get pictures back, but I never get good phone reception? tis strange ;)

alxths
Jan 4, 2004, 05:11 PM
I'm curious now, why aer the pictures in black and white?

Mr. Anderson
Jan 4, 2004, 05:16 PM
The thing is that understanding more about the universe, we learn more about how we got here. And if we find life on other planets (I don't really have any doubt on this one, its just a matter of when, not if) it will totally change our perspective. It won't have to be sentient life, either, just proof that life can exist outside of Earth will be enough.

We hold on a little too strongly to our traditions and old ways of thinking (its sometimes easier to be told what we want to hear than be handed the truth). The universe is so friggin big, to believe that we are the only life here is a bit conceited.

But I don't want this to get off topic, if someone wants to start another thread, go right ahead. I think its great that we managed to land successfully. I hope the other rover does as well.

D :D

Awimoway
Jan 4, 2004, 05:27 PM
Originally posted by alxths
I'm curious now, why aer the pictures in black and white?

I'm pretty sure it's because they had a limited window last night to download some quick and dirty pix. They said that at midnight PT they would lose the connection. I can only assume better quality color photos are on the way when they get a larger communication window.

I was reading that the rover won't even begin to move around for a week. That sounds to me like they're being extra cautious and doing everything in its due time, and not sooner. I would assume the same is true for better quality photos.

Doctor Q
Jan 4, 2004, 06:30 PM
Originally posted by krossfyter
whats the bid deal here?

hasnt nasa landed a rover on mars before?This is our chance to do a more thorough study of the question "Was there ever water on Mars?" It's commonly believed that water is required for life, since it's required for "life as we know it", so it became question #1 and the mission is designed to get us some answers. Of course, if there is "life not as we know it" there, we'd like to know that too!

Doctor Q
Jan 4, 2004, 06:43 PM
There is a PBS "Nova" show about the JPL Mars program on TV tonite (either repeating or continuing Tuesday, I can't tell which). The show is called "Mars Dead or Alive".

wdlove
Jan 4, 2004, 08:05 PM
I just finished watching the show on PBS, "Mars: Dead Or Live." The show was impressive. I felt awe inspired. The launch gave me a tense feeling along with the JPL technicians. Had the same experience with the landing.

I thought that the Tuesday evening show would be a repeat. But according to the broadcast they will be showing a panoramic view of Mars from Spirit. Also some live shots of Mars. I am already excited with anticipation. Now I havee two things to look forward to on Tuesday.

Awimoway
Jan 4, 2004, 10:34 PM
Originally posted by wdlove
I just finished watching the show on PBS, "Mars: Dead Or Live." The show was impressive. I felt awe inspired. The launch gave me a tense feeling along with the JPL technicians.

I'm watching it now. The only computer I've seen being used by the parachute design team is a PowerBook. :)

Edit: More powerbooks (older ones, this time). Cool.

jeff.macaddict
Jan 6, 2004, 12:30 AM
I believe that sometime tonight, the 6th, NASA will recieve color photos from Mars. It takes a lot longer and more information to encode and decode the color pix.

Doctor Q
Jan 6, 2004, 01:03 AM
I watched the show tonite on tape. The animations are great, showing both how the descent and landing could work correctly and how things could go wrong. The description of the rover as an "off-road off-planet vehicle" was a great understatement.

The interplay of scientists and engineers was also interesting. They are all on the same team, but from two points of view.

Nermal
Jan 6, 2004, 01:17 AM
Originally posted by jeff.macaddict
yeah, I've been to mars. It was okay.:p

I've been too. I didn't like it very much. I was part of a group called the "Red Faction" ;)

krimson
Jan 6, 2004, 09:08 AM
My friend works on the MER project, and he's so stoked the last few days... but im happy for him, and his project... here's his profile (http://zipcodemars.jpl.nasa.gov/bio-contribution.cfm?bid=120&cid=116&pid=116&country_id=US&state_id=CA).

Doctor Q
Jan 6, 2004, 02:33 PM
Originally posted by krimson
My friend works on the MER projectPretty impressive for a high-school dropout! A nice job to have.

krimson
Jan 7, 2004, 10:07 AM
I just spoke to him about that PBS NOVA special from last night, i didn't get a chance to watch on sunday.. and I noticed that there were alot of Powerbooks (17", 15"AL, Pismo's), and he said that about 1/2 of the laptops were powerbooks on the MER project..
He also said there would be more, but Xerox provides some of the software, and they wont port it to OS X, so he's stuck with getting a Dell. :mad:

Mr. Anderson
Jan 7, 2004, 10:25 AM
Originally posted by krimson
and I noticed that there were alot of Powerbooks (17", 15"AL, Pismo's), and he said that about 1/2 of the laptops were powerbooks on the MER project..


I noticed that last night as well. Good show - amazing what they had to deal with - problems with the bags and parachute.....great stuff.

Has anyone managed to view the hires image yet? I've only been able to get the medium res verison, but its still great.

Also, I read it seems they've been having problems with getting large amounts of data off the rover. I hope that gets fixed soon.

D

Megaquad
Jan 7, 2004, 11:36 AM
What? I haven't seen any pictures from Mars. If it landed why couldn't they take pictures. I'll believe it when I see it (or maybe I wont).

Meh, if Steve Jobs was head of NASA they would already have iBases all around solar system.

krimson
Jan 7, 2004, 12:30 PM
Originally posted by Mr. Anderson
I noticed that last night as well. Good show - amazing what they had to deal with - problems with the bags and parachute.....great stuff.

Has anyone managed to view the hires image yet? I've only been able to get the medium res verison, but its still great.

Also, I read it seems they've been having problems with getting large amounts of data off the rover. I hope that gets fixed soon.

D

i closed the IM window from this morning, but he said, they're getting approx 53.6 megabit stream from the working antenna, and the that whenthe high gain antenna starts up, that number will increase quite a bit.

Doctor Q
Jan 8, 2004, 01:05 PM
You can download a public version of JPL's "Maestro", the program that NASA scientists use to operate Spirit. It runs on Windows 98, ME, XP, and 2000, Mac OS X 10.3.1 or later, Linux, and Solaris. It lets you view the rover's photos using the real data, plan "virtual experiments", and pretend you control the rover. Download the 27MB program (http://mars.telascience.org/downloads.html) and the data gathered so far (http://mars.telascience.org/data1.html).

wdlove
Jan 8, 2004, 01:38 PM
This is great news Doctor Q. Seeing this is something that makes me real sad that I don't have Panther running. Is this program simple to use, meaning intuitive?

Mr. Anderson
Jan 8, 2004, 01:40 PM
I downloaded it, but it didn't run. Anyone else try this and get it to work?

D

Awimoway
Jan 8, 2004, 01:43 PM
Originally posted by Mr. Anderson
I downloaded it, but it didn't run. Anyone else try this and get it to work?

D

Yes, it's working for me. For the Mac version it says you have to install this first: link. (http://docs.info.apple.com/article.html?artnum=120289)

Thanks for the tip, DoctorQ. This is great. I don't have time to play around with it much, but it looks great.

Doctor Q
Jan 9, 2004, 08:27 PM
JPL news: The flight team at JPL played Bob Marley's "Get Up, Stand Up" as wake-up music shortly before Spirit was raised by a lift mechanism under its belly and its front wheels were fully extended. Then the rover was set back down, raised again and set down again to check whether suspension mechanisms had latched properly. Pictures returned from the rover's navigation camera and front hazard-identification camera, plus other data, confirmed success.

Doctor Q
Jan 11, 2004, 08:34 PM
Will somebody please explain something to me? I must be missing something obvious.

How did Spirit take an overhead photo of itself (http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/mer2004/rover-images/jan-11-2004/navcam_egress_arrow-med.jpg) without an arm extending toward the camera? What's holding the camera? Or did they make a mosaic by combining photos without including any that showed the navigation camera arm? (The yellow arrow shows the direction it will likely follow to disembark.)

Page about the photo: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/mer2004/rover-images/jan-11-2004/captions/image-1.html

Rower_CPU
Jan 11, 2004, 10:52 PM
Dr Q-

You answered yourself.

From the NASA page
This mosaic image taken by the navigation camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit represents an overhead view of the rover as it prepares to roll off the lander and onto the martian surface.

Doctor Q
Jan 12, 2004, 12:37 AM
Yes, I read that it was a mosaic, but it still seemed odd to me that there was no sign of the arm supporting the camera in the photo. Not a big deal, however.

I was out of the city this weekend and it was great to see the stars so clearly without all the city lights ruining the view. I couldn't quite pick out Spirit while looking toward Mars, but I pretended I could.

krimson
Jan 12, 2004, 08:52 AM
im guessing the camera post would be where the black "octagon" in the center would be.

Mr. Anderson
Jan 12, 2004, 09:10 AM
Originally posted by krimson
im guessing the camera post would be where the black "octagon" in the center would be.

exactly - and the distortion on the horizon might indicate a mirror. Cool stuff, regardless. Too bad we have to wait until Wednesday to get the rover on the planet.

D

wdlove
Jan 12, 2004, 07:36 PM
Guy Webster_ (818) 354-5011______
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. __
______
Donald Savage_ (202) 358-1547
NASA Headquarters, Washington___________________ ___January 12, 2004
_
NEWS RELEASE: 2004-016

Spirit's Surroundings Beckon in Color Panorama

The first 360-degree color view from NASA's Spirit Mars Exploration Rover presents a range of tempting targets from nearby rocks to hills on the horizon.

"The whole panorama is there before us," said rover science-team member Dr. Michael Malin of Malin Space Science Systems, San Diego. "It's a great opening to the next stage of our mission."

Spirit's flight team at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., continues making progress toward getting the rover off its lander platform, but expected no sooner than early Thursday morning. "We're about to kick the baby bird out of its nest," said JPL's Kevin Burke, lead mechanical engineer for the rover's egress off the lander.

The color panorama is a mosaic stitched from 225 frames taken by Spirit's panoramic camera. It spans 75 frames across, three frames tall, with color information from shots through three different filters. The images were calibrated at Cornell University, Ithaca, N.Y., home institution for Dr. Jim Bell, panoramic camera team leader.

Malin said, "Seeing the panorama totally assembled instead of in individual pieces gives a much greater appreciation for the position of things and helps in developing a sense of direction. I find it easier to visualize where I am on Mars when I can look at different directions in one view. For a field geologist, it's exactly the kind of thing you want to look at to understand where you are."

Another new image product from Spirit shows a patch of intriguing soil near the lander in greater detail than an earlier view of the same area. Scientists have dubbed the patch "Magic Carpet" for how some soil behaved when scraped by a retracting airbag.

"It has been detached and folded like a piece of carpet sliding across the floor," said science-team member Dr. John Grotzinger of Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge.

Spirit's next step in preparing to drive onto the surface of Mars is to sever its final connection with the lander platform by firing a cable cutter, which Burke described as "an explosive guillotine." The planned sequence after that is a turn in place of 115 degrees clockwise, completed in three steps over the next two days. If no obstacles are seen from images taken partway through that turn, drive-off is planned toward the northwestern compass point of 286 degrees._

Spirit landed on Mars Jan. 3 after a seven-month journey. Its task is to spend the next three months exploring rocks and soil for clues about whether the past environment in Gusev Crater was ever watery and suitable to sustain life._ Spirit's twin Mars Exploration Rover, Opportunity, will reach Mars Jan. 24 PST (Jan. 25 Univeral Time and EST) to begin a similar examination of a site on a broad plain called Meridiani Planum, on the opposite side of the planet from Gusev Crater.

NASA JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, manages the Mars Exploration Rover project for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington._ For information about NASA and the Mars mission on the Internet, visit: http://www.nasa.gov ._ Additional information about the project is available on the Internet at: http://marsrovers.jpl.nasa.gov ._ Mission information is also available from Cornell University, at:_ http://athena.cornell.edu .
________
-end-


___________________________

Mr. Anderson
Jan 12, 2004, 10:27 PM
The news story is nice, but you should link the image - that's the best part.

And you don't have to thank me ;)

D

Doctor Q
Jan 13, 2004, 12:51 PM
The latest photo:

wdlove
Jan 13, 2004, 02:22 PM
An interesting factoid the scientists working at JPL connected with Spirit have special watches, actiwatch. They are having to adjust to Mars time 24.7/7, because a day on Mars is 39 minutes and 35.2 seconds longer than on Earth.

http://www.boston.com/news/science/articles/2004/01/13/living_on_mars_time_2477/

Something else interesting, NASA is doing research to help us on Earth and in space. It is a study on Bed Rest, because of the delibiltating effects. Something that we had to deal with in nursing, a real medical problem. I have inquired at Tufts to see if I might qualify to participate in this study.

http://www.boston.com/news/science/articles/2004/01/13/bed_rest_study_can_help_on_earth_and_in_space/

CmdrLaForge
Jan 13, 2004, 02:40 PM
Originally posted by Awimoway
Woohoo! :)

I'm watcing on the NASA channel. Fun stuff. I feel really sorry for the Brits' Beagle 2. That must have seemed a bad omen for the superstitious at JPL. Watching these guys, I it's like watching big stakes gamblers with immense patience. They dedicate years of their lives to something that can SNAFU in a second.

Why is the Beagle British? I thought its from the EU ?

And yes, the pic are really great.

Doctor Q
Jan 13, 2004, 06:26 PM
Originally posted by wdlove Something else interesting, NASA is doing research to help us on Earth and in space. It is a study on Bed Rest, because of the delibiltating effects. Something that we had to deal with in nursing, a real medical problem. I have inquired at Tufts to see if I might qualify to participate in this study.

http://www.boston.com/news/science/articles/2004/01/13/bed_rest_study_can_help_on_earth_and_in_space/ [/B]Lying around to earn thousands of dollars might sound tempting to some, but I would go stir crazy. I'm sure you'd like to help with the research because it could help both astronauts and the rest of us back home, but wouldn't you be worried about suffering the known effects of prolonged bedrest yourself?

wdlove
Jan 13, 2004, 07:26 PM
Originally posted by Doctor Q
Lying around to earn thousands of dollars might sound tempting to some, but I would go stir crazy. I'm sure you'd like to help with the research because it could help both astronauts and the rest of us back home, but wouldn't you be worried about suffering the known effects of prolonged bedrest yourself?

Thank you Doctor Q, I appreciate your concern. Actually the Astronauts in space suffer the same effects of bed rest. They are in a weightless for a greater duration. The effects are reversable. They are using a younger age group to avoid some of the problems. Bed rest is dangerous. From experiences that I have had, don't think bed rest will be a problem. Also my nursing knowledge will be a help. I mentioned a couple of things to the recruiter, she appreciated my question.

I think that it would be a worth while thing to do for mankind and space exploration. My only real chance to do something in space exploration. I feel that it is worth the investigation.

Doctor Q
Jan 15, 2004, 01:07 AM
In one hour, Spirit will roll down its ramp onto the Martian surface. Initially, there will be a two-hour communication blackout so we won't know the results until the move is complete. Keep your fingers crossed, since that is a known scientific method for improving the chances of success.

Spirit's first task after leaving its platform is to photograph the lander behind it.

krimson
Jan 15, 2004, 08:44 AM
Originally posted by Doctor Q
The latest photo:


LOL!!!!!!! oh gawd, im dying over here.. :D

Mr. Anderson
Jan 15, 2004, 08:52 AM
WooHoo! its off and running!

news conference at 10:00 PST http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/mer/landing.cfm

D :D

krimson
Jan 15, 2004, 09:34 AM
i know it's a stretch, but anyone else notice that the second rover (Opportunity) is landing on Jan 24th? :)

Stike
Jan 15, 2004, 10:07 AM
Originally posted by Mr. Anderson
WooHoo! its off and running!
D :D
Notice that?! The trail of the wheels looks like it was a bit wet!? I think there is a shimmer on the ground too!? Maybe it is something with my eye ;) :D

Mr. Anderson
Jan 15, 2004, 10:25 AM
Nah, not wet. Remember a couple of things - no surface water on Mars for a couple reasons, most of which is that its well below freezing ;)

Its very fine dust that's been deposited on top of rock/gravel. So its just making its imprint on dirt - there are very few similar locations on earth like this - especially with no rain or snow, so its a bit deceiving.

Also, remember the gravity is about 1/9th of earth's, so things react a little differently under lighter gravity (dust is less compressed).

D

krimson
Jan 15, 2004, 10:59 AM
Originally posted by wdlove
An interesting factoid the scientists working at JPL connected with Spirit have special watches, actiwatch. They are having to adjust to Mars time 24.7/7, because a day on Mars is 39 minutes and 35.2 seconds longer than on Earth.

http://www.boston.com/news/science/articles/2004/01/13/living_on_mars_time_2477/

Something else interesting, NASA is doing research to help us on Earth and in space. It is a study on Bed Rest, because of the delibiltating effects. Something that we had to deal with in nursing, a real medical problem. I have inquired at Tufts to see if I might qualify to participate in this study.

http://www.boston.com/news/science/articles/2004/01/13/bed_rest_study_can_help_on_earth_and_in_space/

I asked my friend about those watches..


As for Mars watches, they are being made by Executive Jewelers in Montrose. Between $150 and $200 a pop. *eek!* That's why I don't have one. I just go here (http://marsrovers.jpl.nasa.gov/gallery/video/flash/rover_tod_5.swf) instead.

Mr. Anderson
Jan 15, 2004, 11:18 AM
But unless you were on Mars or working at JPL with the rovers, you really couldn't use the watches...:D

To use it effectively, you'd need a Martian Calendar as well....and they have a 687 day year....you'd have to come up with a whole bunch of extra months to fill it up.

When we do have a colony there, I wonder what they call the months and who will get to decide what they'll be - how many and how many days long each. Probably depend on who gets there first and sets up the colony.

D

krimson
Jan 15, 2004, 11:20 AM
theoretically, it wouldn't work here on earth, but it would be a really good geeky icebreaker on a date..

"So, did you know the time on mars is XX:XX?"

--
wonder how much i could get for those on eBay...

krimson
Jan 15, 2004, 12:11 PM
Has anyone seen this image?

Mr. Anderson
Jan 15, 2004, 12:13 PM
Originally posted by krimson

"So, did you know the time on mars is XX:XX?"


you'd have to find a very special someone to have that make an impression ;)

I'm still stuck on the Martian months - 687 days means 17 31 day months and 5 32 day months - for a total of 22 months in a Martian year. Which means we'd have to come up with 10 new names for the new months (assuming we kept with the 30ish days per month). If we kept the 12 month calendar, it would be 9 months of 57 days and 3 months of 58 days.

The 58th day of June just doesn't sound right :D

D

krimson
Jan 15, 2004, 12:13 PM
Here's the original NASA didn't want you to see.

Mr. Anderson
Jan 15, 2004, 12:14 PM
You make that or someone send it to you?

D

krimson
Jan 15, 2004, 12:16 PM
My JPL friend sent that to me... LOL


-------------------------------------------------------
Originally posted by Mr. Anderson
you'd have to find a very special someone to have that make an impression ;)

I'm still stuck on the Martian months - 687 days means 17 31 day months and 5 32 day months - for a total of 22 months in a Martian year. Which means we'd have to come up with 10 new names for the new months (assuming we kept with the 30ish days per month). If we kept the 12 month calendar, it would be 9 months of 57 days and 3 months of 58 days.

The 58th day of June just doesn't sound right :D

D

I wouldn't mind the 58th of June, as long as we dont have this stupid daylight savings time we have here in (parts of) the US.

Mr. Anderson
Jan 15, 2004, 12:21 PM
Originally posted by krimson

I wouldn't mind the 58th of June, as long as we dont have this stupid daylight savings time we have here in (parts of) the US.

The Martian inclination of axis is almost exactly the same as Earth's - so there actually might be daylight savings time some where on Mars when humans finally arrive.

Also, setting up time zones and getting an equivalent GPS system up and running will be important - makes you wonder where 0 longitude will be :D

D

krimson
Jan 15, 2004, 12:24 PM
Woah, that's deep... never even considered the Long/Lat.. Im guessing it'll be wherever we first make a settlement/human landing.

The daylight savings time, just isn't needed in this day and age of streetlights and such.. besides, im always late to work after we change to and back. :p
--------------------------
i rather liked this one...

Doctor Q
Jan 15, 2004, 01:58 PM
An article I read about how the JPL scientists are sleeping on a Martian-day schedule said that teenagers naturally have a daily cycle that's a little over 24 hours. If true, it means that teenagers and Martians are related. :)

We should get some good data about the evidence of water on Mars now that Spirit is out there hot rodding. I hope it obeys the traffic laws.

Stelliform
Jan 15, 2004, 02:44 PM
Originally posted by Doctor Q
Lying around to earn thousands of dollars might sound tempting to some, but I would go stir crazy.

It sounds like a sweet deal if you were a freelance programmer or something.... You could still make your income and clear and extra $5K!

Plus the benefit to humanity and all that.... :)

Stelliform
Jan 15, 2004, 02:47 PM
Originally posted by Mr. Anderson

When we do have a colony there, I wonder what they call the months and who will get to decide what they'll be -

Well if there is any truth to the first to call it, (kind of like that guy selling lunar property. ) I call dibs on Stelluary... How does Mr.Auary sound? ;)

wdlove
Jan 15, 2004, 07:45 PM
Originally posted by Stelliform
Well if there is any truth to the first to call it, (kind of like that guy selling lunar property. ) I call dibs on Stelluary... How does Mr.Auary sound? ;)

That would be OK, if we could also use Lovril! ;)

Mr. Anderson
Jan 16, 2004, 01:10 PM
Took a look at the raw pics from today and did a very fast comp of a few. Its the rover looking back at the lander :D

D

krimson
Feb 11, 2004, 09:31 AM
Originally posted by Mr. Anderson
The Martian inclination of axis is almost exactly the same as Earth's - so there actually might be daylight savings time some where on Mars when humans finally arrive.

Also, setting up time zones and getting an equivalent GPS system up and running will be important - makes you wonder where 0 longitude will be :D

D

i FINALLY got the answer i asked him.. LOL

************ (7:27:00 AM): Mars longitude was determined by a guy who decided the Prime Meridan's for all the planets in our solar system. It was kind of arbitrary, and has now been defined at the center of a particular crater who's name escapes me at the moment. however, it's REALLY close to Opportunity which is kicking it at the Meridiana Planum.

************ (7:28:27 AM): And if you want to know more about time on mars and such, here's a really cool application. http://www.giss.nasa.gov/tools/mars24/

-edit: yeah, there is a OS X version of that app. :D