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MacRumorsAddict
Jan 11, 2004, 01:15 PM
Just found this, not sure if its true.. seems a bit weird

According to this post in a forum I visit it appears that Adobe Photoshop CS will not let the user open any images of currency??

you can look at the full thread HERE (http://s3.invisionfree.com/scotto/index.php?showtopic=47&st=0&#last)

Mr. Anderson
Jan 11, 2004, 01:31 PM
This sounds a little too wild to be true. Where's the proof?

I'll be getting PS CS in a few weeks and I'll try scanning in a 20 - but what sort of image recognition code do they have in there?

D :rolleyes:

MacRumorsAddict
Jan 11, 2004, 01:43 PM
OH MY GOD.. its true.. someone has posted a screen grab at theappleclub.co.uk (http://s3.invisionfree.com/scotto/index.php?showtopic=47)

iJon
Jan 11, 2004, 02:16 PM
wow that is pretty cool, interesting as wel.

iJon

RumorMonger
Jan 11, 2004, 02:24 PM
COOL????!?!?!?!

It's censorship! Who the hell is Adobe to tell me what I can or can't scan with the software I paid good money for?

MacRumorSkeptic
Jan 11, 2004, 02:25 PM
This is an OUTRAGE!!! Just tried it with an image of a $20 bill myself and sure enough it won't let me open it. Adobe better fix this nonsense.

ThomasJefferson
Jan 11, 2004, 02:52 PM
Nuts. This means I will finally have to get a job.

bitfactory
Jan 11, 2004, 03:06 PM
yep - it looks in the blue channel for a certain algorithm.

d/l this small little image to your desktop and try to open it with PS CS and you'll see the message (note: this image is just a small blue circular shaped design, not a whole bill). this is the blue stuff in the new $20 bill that it looks for.

http://jyrikup.tripod.com/pics/new.png

this must affect the performance of PS. every time you open an image it looks for those algorithms (new $20 bill, a host of other foreign banknotes)...

hmmmph....

kettle
Jan 11, 2004, 03:06 PM
Works with Pounds Sterling.:)

Horrortaxi
Jan 11, 2004, 03:44 PM
Newer color copiers do the same thing.

Photoshop is for editing images, so this is a little disturbing. It's okay to copy money as long as the copy is bigger or smaller than original. Why should scanning or color copies be any different?

kettle
Jan 11, 2004, 04:13 PM
The Apple Club? is that like the Disney Club with better Animation? :p

kenkooler
Jan 11, 2004, 04:30 PM
Considering that using bills is pretty common in advertising and some other things related to graphics design this is stupid....

DVDSP
Jan 11, 2004, 05:26 PM
Originally posted by RumorMonger
It's censorship! Who the hell is Adobe to tell me what I can or can't scan with the software I paid good money for?

Actually, you only paid for a license to use their software and Adobe has chosen to make editing money a feature that their software doesn't support. Not that I agree with them but maybe there are implications we are unaware of. Is it possible that Adobe could be held responsible if it is proven that PS aids in counterfeiting?

Also, if it is important that you need to edit money (or counterfeit :) ) just keep an older version of PS around for when that time comes.

cb911
Jan 11, 2004, 05:35 PM
yeah, i read about this a couple of days ago... kinda sucks. not that i want to, or have ever worked with images of currency, but this just reduces Photoshops functionality as an image editing app, just so everyone knows, i think this really sucks!!:mad:

but there's always photoshop 7....;) :p

Pepzhez
Jan 11, 2004, 06:03 PM
There's always GIMP ... and it's free.

TylerL
Jan 11, 2004, 06:28 PM
Hello goons.

MacBytes
Jan 11, 2004, 07:58 PM
Category: Forum Posts
Link: Photoshop CS blocks images of currency. (http://www.macbytes.com/link.php?sid=20040111205803)

Posted on MacBytes.com (http://www.macbytes.com)

Approved by Mudbug

chewbaccapits
Jan 11, 2004, 08:06 PM
What!...Why should PS tell a person what they can scan or not!...

Nermal
Jan 11, 2004, 08:14 PM
Agreed. It shouldn't be up to the software developers to decide what we can do with our systems. This isn't Windows after all!

bobindashadows
Jan 11, 2004, 08:36 PM
I don't know about you guys...


but this is pretty funny. I don't have a scanner, nor do I think that the programmers should stop you from scanning money, but I think that is just hilarious... not sure why.

bennetsaysargh
Jan 11, 2004, 08:47 PM
well,, i think that they should have done something else to protect against fraud, although i can't think of anything.
it is kinda funny in a sense that people scan in money.

ITR 81
Jan 11, 2004, 08:53 PM
If people didn't counterfeit money then we wouldn't have to deal with this.

I don't scan money so whats the damn point.

Sun Baked
Jan 11, 2004, 09:02 PM
Too many cases of easy to make bad money...

Take that to the extreme where a kid recently (past 60 days) paid $5 for some bogus bills and bought the loaded revolver he took to school.

Desktop computing is powerful enough to make high quality money, if people were to get some decent paper.

If you cannot clean up the money with Photoshop, it'll be a bit harder.

slipper
Jan 11, 2004, 09:19 PM
id imagine photoshop is used a lot for forgery. ive used it to forge....oops

Jerry Spoon
Jan 11, 2004, 09:24 PM
They just demonstrated this on Screen Savers last week. It was pretty cool. I'd like to know what's built into the program that recognized the money and how much I'd have to alter the money to have a scan go through...just out of curiosity.;)

GeeYouEye
Jan 11, 2004, 09:40 PM
It gets better:

http://www.milho.de/images/ps8_C_en_S_ored.jpg

RumorMonger
Jan 11, 2004, 10:37 PM
No ***** way

Lemming
Jan 11, 2004, 10:38 PM
I think this is a bad idea because people who want to use the image of a dollar bill in something (educational purposes, or comparison charts and the like) are now unable to. It is legal to print money if it is:
1 sided
noticeably smaller than a normal bill
noticeably bigger

RumorMonger
Jan 11, 2004, 10:39 PM
Originally posted by DVDSP
Not that I agree with them but maybe there are implications we are unaware of. Is it possible that Adobe could be held responsible if it is proven that PS aids in counterfeiting?

I'm sorry, but I do not accept the "potential liability" argument. I suspect that Photoshop has been used far more often for other illegal pursuits such as the processing of child pornography images. What's Adobe going to do in response to that, add a filter that prevents us from scanning pictures of our kids in the bathtub?

If the scanning of money was in itself illegal, I would totally understand this whole thing. But in order to be illegal, you have to:
(a) produce an image,
(b) produce it in color,
(c) produce it double-sided, and
(d) produce it within the range of -25% to +50% the actual size of the banknote.

To be fair, though, this may or may not be Adobe's stupidity. I am perfectly willing to accept the possibility that Adobe has been forced to be stupid by some regulatory agency that excels in stupidity. But whomever at Adobe wrote the filter such that it cannot distinguish actual money from Monopoly money is the most stupid of them all.

dukemeiser
Jan 11, 2004, 10:58 PM
Originally posted by GeeYouEye
It gets better:


LOL!

I'm sure some bright young mind will find a work around for this eventually. In the meantime Photoshop Elements hasn't been $ crippled (yet).

idkew
Jan 12, 2004, 12:26 AM
Originally posted by RumorMonger
If the scanning of money was in itself illegal, I would totally understand this whole thing. But in order to be illegal, you have to:
(a) produce an image,
(b) produce it in color,
(c) produce it double-sided, and
(d) produce it within the range of -25% to +50% the actual size of the banknote.


And produce it in full.

idkew
Jan 12, 2004, 12:27 AM
sorry, forgot the attachment

ITR 81
Jan 12, 2004, 01:57 AM
Originally posted by Lemming
I think this is a bad idea because people who want to use the image of a dollar bill in something (educational purposes, or comparison charts and the like) are now unable to. It is legal to print money if it is:
1 sided
noticeably smaller than a normal bill
noticeably bigger

You can still do this.
Just take a picture of it and import it.

Sir_Giggles
Jan 12, 2004, 02:41 AM
I scanned in a $5 dollar canadian bill and no warning came up. Hmmm... :p

Sun Baked
Jan 12, 2004, 03:09 AM
Originally posted by Sir_Giggles
I scanned in a $5 dollar canadian bill and no warning came up. Hmmm... :p What do you expect, those Canadian bills are worth less than the US Bills and Monopoly Money Adobe is blocking. :cool:

Jerry Spoon
Jan 12, 2004, 05:09 AM
Originally posted by Lemming
I think this is a bad idea because people who want to use the image of a dollar bill in something (educational purposes, or comparison charts and the like) are now unable to.

If you're just using it for these purposes, us bureau of engraving and printing have images (front and back) of the new 20 on their web site. You can usually find images of other us bills off of ebay too. Still no real reason to scan.

robotrenegade
Jan 12, 2004, 07:37 AM
I didn't beleive this until I tried it myself.

jxyama
Jan 12, 2004, 08:58 AM
Originally posted by RumorMonger
I'm sorry, but I do not accept the "potential liability" argument.

if someone is stupid enough and laywers are ridiculous enough to sue rockstar games, etc. on GTA for the kid's violence, i don't see why adobe should not cover itself from this kind of liability.

it's far easier for adobe to say that its program cannot open images of bills (unless hacked, then adobe would be off the hook anyway) than defend how the program cannot be held liable for forgery after counterfits are discovered.

Mr. Anderson
Jan 12, 2004, 09:07 AM
This is not good - using a picture of money in ads and such, you need to be able to use photoshop to compose the images. Morons......

Just reason enough to keep PS 7.0 around so if you need to make an image with money in it you can at least do the work.

As for the monopoly money, that's just plain wrong....this might end up biting Adobe in the ass.:rolleyes:

D

jxyama
Jan 12, 2004, 09:12 AM
perhaps they will offer some sort of "verified" add-ons for marketing departments, etc. where images of bills are necessary for legitimate reasons...

i guess they've concluded that covering themselves is more important than catering to "minority" of users who need images of bills for "legitimate" reasons. (whether users should have to provide such a proof their legitimacy is a whole different matter.)

monopoly money thing, yes, it goes without saying, is dumb. if they are going to cover themselves, they better do a little bit better job than blocking anything and everything that looks like bills.

idkew
Jan 12, 2004, 11:28 AM
ok, i was a bit skeptical about the monopoly money part. i downloaded some (vector) money from hasboro, and I had no problem opening it. I also converted it to a raster image, and I had no problem either.

Frank Schuerman
Jan 12, 2004, 11:44 AM
same thing with euro's, i'm from belgium and i scanned a 50 EURO note to test it and i get the same pop-up as seen in this thread on the screenshot, nifty :D

wondering if ADOBE will release an "update" for this travisty.

TwitchOSX
Jan 12, 2004, 11:49 AM
I needed to scan in a bill ($1.00 - but still a bill) for a customer to create a $1.00 Gift Certificate. I would be pissed if I had to try and take a low res gif from some government website and try to make it work on a high res output. It would be nasty. The Gift certificate we created just goes on colored paper with black ink, and is very noticably wider and thinner than a regular bill as well as being one sided.

BTW, Remember, on a Mac, you can have several versions of a program (usually impossible or more difficult to have several versions running of a program on Windows). Just keep a copy of PS 7 or whatever laying around on your HD if this is something you think you might need to do in the future. (scanning bills that is)

Chip NoVaMac
Jan 12, 2004, 01:00 PM
Thought this would be of interest.

http://www.nevadasurveyor.com/adobe/spygame.htm

eric_n_dfw
Jan 12, 2004, 02:10 PM
Originally posted by Lemming
I think this is a bad idea because people who want to use the image of a dollar bill in something (educational purposes, or comparison charts and the like) are now unable to. It is legal to print money if it is:
1 sided
noticeably smaller than a normal bill
noticeably bigger Actually, I thought it was legal to do anything you wanted with it EXCEPT try to pass it as real curency. This is true even with obviously fake money AFAIK.

TwitchOSX
Jan 12, 2004, 02:24 PM
Yea, its illegal to try to buy cigarettes with Monopoly money.. but I dont think you would get busted for it. They would just laugh at you. However, when it comes to real currency, there are specifications that somebody mentioned earlier. They state that the reproduced bill has to be a certain percent larger or smaller than the real bill. Also, when we copy money on our color copier, we have to have the output be larger or smaller (25%?) than the original bill. If somebody were to come in (police perhaps undercover) and ask us to copy a bill and leave it the same size, I believe we could get in trouble for that.

MrMacMan
Jan 12, 2004, 07:06 PM
Originally posted by ITR 81
If people didn't counterfeit money then we wouldn't have to deal with this.

I don't scan money so whats the damn point.

I wanted a simple retouch of my scanned dollar bill and my face on it for MrMacMan Dollars... (online contest based off a question)... but It no longer allows me to do this...

This is why its annoying.

My Dollar bill is near 75% of the normal bill... so it falls within the necessary legal copying guidelines... but its blocked.


Time to make an Appleworks image... ARG!

:mad:

DVDSP
Jan 13, 2004, 06:34 PM
Saw this today in an email from creativepro.com:

In case you missed it, the topic is the revelation that Adobe inserted code into Photoshop CS that deters the copying of currency. In other words, if you scan in a banknote and then open the image in Photoshop CS, a message advises that the program won't open the file due to its "unauthorized" content. Adobe acknowledged the secret code and said its placement was at the behest of the Central Bank Counterfeit Deterrence Group, which works with a consortium of international banks and agencies.

I should have known the Central Bank Counterfeit Deterrence Group was behind this!

Here is a link (http://maccentral.macworld.com/news/2004/01/12/photoshop/index.php?redirect=1074011386000) to a short MacCentral article about it...

Royal Pineapple
Jan 13, 2004, 08:42 PM
WASHINGTON (AP) -- Adobe Systems Inc. acknowledged Friday it quietly added technology to the world's best-known graphics software at the request of government regulators and international bankers to prevent consumers from making copies of the world's major currencies.

i was unaware that monopoly money was clasified as one of the world's major currencies :D

Doctor Q
Jan 13, 2004, 10:00 PM
Originally posted by Jerry Spoon
us bureau of engraving and printing have images (front and back) of the new 20 on their web site.Those images are not high resolution. Which isn't surprising. It would be a big surprise if USBEP was posting scanned currency suitable for counterfeiters!

U.S. Treasury Images:

http://www.moneyfactory.com/newmoney/images/currency/big_bill_front.gif

http://www.moneyfactory.com/newmoney/images/currency/big_bill_back.gif