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coopdog
Jan 16, 2004, 11:13 PM
How do you make your money? What do you do?

I work at a bike shop during the summer. They have never been that upfront with me on funds I have earned and keep my hours seporate from everyone else. I have a new boss now and I'm not sure If I will be hired again this summer.

A few years ago my friend and I came up with an idea to start an outdoor lighting biz. The low 12V tree lighting kind. I have installed 4 systems with up to 30 lights all for my parents though. :rolleyes: If you get a rich person and use the nicest lights you can charge up to about $25 per light. And $100 per transformer. So pretty good money for a teenager if you could get a job a week. We didn't do it because we couldn't drive then but now that we are 16 it might be a good job. The only problem is advertising. Flyers don't work that well for such an expensive thing. So I don't know to get the word out.


I had an idea to make some products in the mountain bike world. Maybe get a patent but that could take years to get prosessed and to produce.

I was now thinking of using ebay to sell custom built PCs. List the computer parts and everything and then if someone bids and wins I would order and build the computer. So I would not be out any money if they didn't sell. My friend from the lighting biz said that his friend tried doing that and only made $50 a computer so thats under $10 an hour. So no good.

If I don't get the bike shop job I don't know what I will do for a job. Ill hopefuly just get some job at a market or something. :rolleyes:

What could I do to make money? Invest in an off set printing press? I guess I would be "making" money then. :p

Oh yeah, whats your job?

To anyone that doesn't have a job, I'm sorry.

job
Jan 16, 2004, 11:17 PM
i make money watching pretty ladies swim....

:p

MoparShaha
Jan 16, 2004, 11:19 PM
Back in high school I worked at my parish and at my high school. I was basically a secretary at both. Right now, I'm the IT guy at my parish. I setup web sites, servers, video webcasts....ect. Since I live directly across the street from the church, I'm "always on call". I go over there almost daily to help the secretaries (they're afraid of the computers! :D).

Duff-Man
Jan 16, 2004, 11:21 PM
Duff-Man says.....I am an IT guy, work for the Cdn feds, support Windoze all day - enough to make you laugh and cry at the same time......oh yeah!

Stelliform
Jan 16, 2004, 11:25 PM
......

Sun Baked
Jan 16, 2004, 11:54 PM
Originally posted by coopdog
How do you make your money? What do you do? Sorry, don't "make" any money here.

I don't have a good enough printer to do it. :(

Kwyjibo
Jan 17, 2004, 12:09 AM
I'm a manager at the local country club in the restuarant and banquet hall sections ... in the summer i'm going to run the cabanana connected to the pool and probably do a bunch of little errands for my boss like i did over this most recent break ... i didn't mind tho, going to pick up a brand new chevy avalanche was fun , and i've learned a lot about being organized and getting all my stuff done.

themadchemist
Jan 17, 2004, 12:14 AM
I don't. I don't have a job, although I've had a scheme or two. I made some cash selling educational software on eBay (you may have seen the ads on MacRumors). That was a few hundred bucks last summer, before eBay told me to stop.

I don't plan to have a real job until I'm out of grad school. Then I'll be in residency and quasi make money. Then I'll be a doc and be fine. I'd rather focus on studies now than try to earn a few measly bucks that won't mean anything in the long run.

eyelikeart
Jan 17, 2004, 12:15 AM
I'm a janitor.

big
Jan 17, 2004, 12:25 AM
completely unemployed (except all that freelance work designing houses and towns)....

Dros
Jan 17, 2004, 12:34 AM
I do genomics research. My best summer job was washing dishes in Alaska. Slave away for 8 hours then enjoy the dusk at 2am.

scem0
Jan 17, 2004, 12:34 AM
1) money from parents and grandparents for christmas and birthday.
2) My parents might give me 4 dollars to get candy at a movie, but I keep the 4 dollars and dont get any candy.
3) earned $600 this summer re-roofing my house.
4) various other jobs.
5) But the most recent thing I've been doing to make money is selling my lunch. I can get $3.00/day for my lunch, and 5 says a week totals to $15.00.

But I don't get an allowance or anything like that.

scem0

jasylonian
Jan 17, 2004, 12:47 AM
I wish i could find something for me here in Sacramento... being a recent college graduate (read almost 2 years ago) I had an offer rescinded the week before graduation and have been unable to find anything viable since especially since my experience is limited to an internship with the company that eventually rescinded my offer. So I decided that getting my M.A. in economics would help pass time while I did grunt work full time. Unfortunately, my grunt work recently ran out and I'm again in the league of the unemployed (so bored that I finished the Fool's Errand in a couple days). I'm thinking about looking to a baseball town for an internship so I can stay out of my parents' hair for a while. The moral of my story is: I don't care how pretty she is, stay in school until employment is high and you have an offer from a company that isn't facing bankruptcy.

vniow
Jan 17, 2004, 12:57 AM
Eh, I had a full time job for about a month or so, was given the company van since I lived the furthest away from work, stayed out too late at a part last Saturday, got a bit tired driving home, fell asleep at the wheel and crashed it into the siderail, about 15 minutes from my house.

So needless to say I'm broke right now and am living on reserves, may have to sell my 900Mhz iBook if I don't get a job soon....

MacAztec
Jan 17, 2004, 01:20 AM
vniow - Get a friggin' job and keep your iBook!

I'm still in highschool, but I get summerly jobs. I had one last summer and made like a thousand bucks for working a month.

I worked at my tennis tournament down here (its BIG) on the scoreboard, made a thousand bucks in 2 weeks on that!

Then, I sell stuff to my friends from eBay. They want a digital camera that retails for 300$? I sell it for 250 used, and make a hundred bucks hehe.

I made 600$ this week doin crap like that.

Daveman Deluxe
Jan 17, 2004, 01:35 AM
To the unemployed:

I see Burger King and other fast food restuarants ALL THE FRICKIN' TIME with signs that say "help wanted". This is in the state with the second-highest unemployment right now. Find a fast food job if you have to and quit whining.

I don't mean this to tell you that's all that any of you are good for or to be sarcastic, but a job is a job, and there's no shame in working for BK or McDonalds if you need the money. It's called a WORK ETHIC. Nobody will make you continue working at a fast food joint if you finally get a job offer from a company you want to work for.

etoiles
Jan 17, 2004, 01:54 AM
Originally posted by MacAztec

Then, I sell stuff to my friends from eBay. They want a digital camera that retails for 300$? I sell it for 250 used, and make a hundred bucks hehe.


haha, just don't buy them any guns or sharp objects, it could backfire...;)

ibookin'
Jan 17, 2004, 02:05 AM
Tech monkey for an accounting firm. I also write and maintain a job and fixed assets database for the construction company that one of the partners in the accounting firm owns.

iAlan
Jan 17, 2004, 03:15 AM
During university I worked summers in a factory warehouse (the night shift from 5pm to 1am - so still got to spend days in the outdoors playing golf, seeing friends, quick trips to the beach, an hours drive away, etc) I was doing a double major (economics/marketing) and my friends said I was crazy to be working in a factory. Well, I had the money to buy stuff, have a good time and not worry about anything. During university, I worked for the student union and also in the campus coffee shop (which is quite funny given I have never drunk coffee, and never will). It is imortant to note that in Melbourne, Australia most uni student live at home. We don't travel half way across the country to attend a university, just a different educatrion culture really.

Anyway, after graduating, I came to Japan and was teaching English for about a year (again my friends thought I was crazy). After a uear I got into a semi-management possition at a large teaching gripu (they are all over the world and well recognized) I was training teachers on presentation skills, interviewing and managing teacher schedules.

After about 2 years I ended up where I am now - still in Japan and working for a pharmaceutical information/market research company. Basically, I am utilizing my marketing/consulting supporting Japanese pharmaceutical companies with sales/distribution/promotional data for the USA, Europe and Asia markets. It is kind of hard to explain, but the company I work for tracks pharmaceutical sales, what drugs are used (brand/maker), where (city/hospital/clinic/etc), by whom (which doctors) and why (condition/illness).

It is a great job, and a job I never thought I would end up doing (I wanted to get into advertising) but I am very happy to say that all the decisions I have made have led me to where I am now, so no matter how crazy something may seem, never regret anything, learn from bad decisions, leard more from good ones because you will be happy and acheive success if you really want it.

Sorry to sound patronistic, but you younger macrumors members, don't regret working at BK or McD, mowing lawns, cleaning houses, fixing Windows computers (hee hee) etc. It all pays off (no financial pun intend!)

mac15
Jan 17, 2004, 03:43 AM
At the moment, I don't make money. I'm job hunting :)

robbieduncan
Jan 17, 2004, 03:44 AM
I work for CitiGroup in London as a software developer. I've been in the same job since I left University in 2000.

ryme4reson
Jan 17, 2004, 04:40 AM
Still in college, I feel like I am never going to finish, but I am currently a 9-1-1 dispatcher. Its a decent job, but I work nights, and 12 hour shifts (but I only work 12 days a month.

Pay is ok, about 80K. I live at home with moms.


J

WinterMute
Jan 17, 2004, 05:17 AM
I'm a lecturer in Thames Valley University in Ealing, London, I lecture in Music Technology, although I spend most of my time teaching main recording studio skills and audio post production.

I also design and build studios, just finishing a ProTools room in NW London. See pic, sorry it's crap it's only my phone camera.

Still recording and mixing too, looks like I might get a shot at the music on a couple of new films coming up, that would be cool.

WinterMute
Jan 17, 2004, 05:19 AM
Sorry, forgot to attach the pic...:rolleyes:

edesignuk
Jan 17, 2004, 05:35 AM
Another IT Tech checking in :rolleyes:, I'm 1st and 2nd line support for a large US bank :eek:

Mr. Anderson
Jan 17, 2004, 07:06 AM
I drive a school bus - that's why I have so much time to post.

D

blvdeast
Jan 17, 2004, 07:45 AM
I work as a salesman in a little flooring store. I have been there for three years, and I became a "laminate expert"

job
Jan 17, 2004, 08:50 AM
as an expansion on the original question:

what kind of job would you like to have?

i'm waiting to get acceptance letters back from the colleges i applied to. i run track and field and am ranked 1st in my class of 1140. harvard, dartmouth, brown and the university of chicago have all expressed interest in me, especially since i'm what they call a 'scholar-athlete.'

after college/grad school i hope to join the state dept. as a foreign service officer.

mj_1903
Jan 17, 2004, 08:55 AM
I sell Mac software.

It's really quite a good way of earning money if you hit it the first time. It pays the bills, it creates savings and it gives me a lot of free time if I need it, but its a tough job and very mindless.

Awimoway
Jan 17, 2004, 08:56 AM
My dream is to be a novelist. So I chose a dead-end major in college: English. Actually, it helped my writing a lot, but it's not exactly a lucrative job finder. I graduated last summer and did not find anything in my area in editing or technical writing, which had been my hope. I am currently unemployed.

However, I have broken down and am going the way of my parents, even though I always told myself I would hate to do their job: school teacher. Although they teach elementary, which I would never do. I'll be starting as a substitute teacher as early as next week, and will be taking night classes to get my teaching credential. By this summer, I should have a regular job as a high school English teacher. Alas. It'll be okay though. The reason I never wanted to be a teacher of anything below college level (and even then) was because I don't enjoy talking to or teaching people who don't want to learn. I have two sisters-in-law who are both doing first-year internships as teachers (one elem, one high school drama) and are surprised to find that they don't really like it. But I know why they don't like it, and I think this will be the secret to my, er, not success but tolerance of the job: lowered expectations. Most of the kids are there because they have to be. I understand that. Me too. I won't be there to entertain them, to get them to like me, or even to command their rapt attention at every moment. And I'll hold no delusions that anyone wants to learn: the dumb kids are there because they have to be, the smart kids because they want good grades (any actual learning is incidental).

Yeah, yeah. I know. Really inspiring, huh? :o My get-out-of-jail card will either be my writing or I may go to law school in a few years.

Interiority
Jan 17, 2004, 08:56 AM
I have a small database consultancy business here in North-West England - with the emphasis on business reporting and data analysis. Things are a bit slack at the moment, but I'm always optimistic...

Maybe I need to re-design my web-site (http://www.marinconsulting.co.uk)?

Danger! Will
Jan 17, 2004, 09:48 AM
I'm a sales consultant for qwest.

And I like McDonald's lol

eyelikeart
Jan 17, 2004, 10:25 AM
Originally posted by Mr. Anderson
I drive a school bus - that's why I have so much time to post.

aren't high school gigs the best? ;)

jadariv
Jan 17, 2004, 12:13 PM
I do a lot of stuff.

First off, my day job is classified as Graphic Artist. But not the print kind. I make the graphics and effects that go on commericials, music videos and the occasional movie.

But, since I have an English degree, I am often asked to write the content for the commercials. Then that often leads to sitting in on the editing. And of course, I have to go out on shoots sometimes and direct the action. So, I have writer/director/producer on my resume.

But, last year, things started to change. And that's because my ultimate goal has always been to write movies and/or a book. I sold my first script (which starts shooting in a month and half up in canada). Which has led to a pitch meeting next tuesday (I may be close to being able to live off my writing, which would be.....:cool: ).


I think as long as you are interested in something and have a good work ethic a college degree is only window dressing. I took one computer class and one art class in college and look where I am. Go out there and do what you want.

JesseJames
Jan 17, 2004, 01:35 PM
It is very very tough right now for jobs. To anyone looking for meaningful work; best of luck.
I have a degree in Graphic Arts multimedia and I'm not doing a thing with it. Why? NO ONE is hiring a newbie grad. They all want experience more than schooling.
The ol' Catch-22.
I'm at what I call a 'survival' job right now. There are a lot of guys there that are in the same boat as I am. They don't belong there but they have to be. I just got a raise and I'm making almost 15 dollars an hour but when it gets busy you'd rather face a firing squad than get up for work that day. Yes, it's hard physical labor. What can you do? I have no aversion to it because I was in the Army. During the summer all these young guys come in and they work one day and quit the next. Can't handle it. I don't know about this new generation. Shiftless. Character-less.

I'm seriously considering pursuing another career course. I've always wanted to fly and I'm thinking of going to flight school. I don't care how hard it is or how long it takes. It'd be something to look forward to everyday.

Vector
Jan 17, 2004, 01:46 PM
During the school year i daytrade stocks to make money.

vniow
Jan 17, 2004, 02:05 PM
Originally posted by MacAztec
vniow - Get a friggin' job and keep your iBook!


Umm...duh. Don't you think I'm working on it already?

GroundLoop
Jan 17, 2004, 02:49 PM
I design weapons systems for the US Navy. Also do some work for the intelligence industry.

Pays pretty well.

Hickman

rainman::|:|
Jan 17, 2004, 04:01 PM
i'm a Communications Production Specialist, i do executive-level presentations (the presentations themselves, i don't actually get up there and speak, lol)... work for a company that administers voluntary benefits for other companies' employees.

Chances are good, for many people here, the benefits you receive at work were organized by our company, and if they've switched administration within the last year, that i worked on the presentation that sold it to your CEO or board members.

and i think it's within my NDA to say that no, i've never produced presentations for either bill gates or steve jobs. i can't say whether or not i've ever done presentations for either of their companies, however.

paul

iJon
Jan 17, 2004, 05:29 PM
i work for my parents now, but when i get into college ill probably pick up another job. right now im holding off on spending to much cause after the wreck i have to pay my own insurance, and i have a feeling it will be expensive, but my mom said i can pick the car if i pay the insurance so im determened to get my liberty.

iJon

Mr. Anderson
Jan 17, 2004, 06:12 PM
Originally posted by eyelikeart
aren't high school gigs the best? ;)

The kids get a bit rowdy, but then I get them all to sing songs and its kind of fun. :D

We get a lot of stares sometimes when the bus gets rocking with all the windows down....

D

eyelikeart
Jan 17, 2004, 06:37 PM
Originally posted by Mr. Anderson
The kids get a bit rowdy, but then I get them all to sing songs and its kind of fun. :D

We get a lot of stares sometimes when the bus gets rocking with all the windows down....

hehe...that's when it really gets to be "fun" :D

wdlove
Jan 17, 2004, 06:55 PM
Originally posted by Mr. Anderson
I drive a school bus - that's why I have so much time to post.

D

I remember riding a school bus for 12 years. They are mostly fond memories. All of my bus drivers liked me and so had no problems. During elementary school she let me sit up next to her, I set on the heater. It was great during the winter. Thank you for your service Mr. Anderson. I think that it is a very honorable job. A chance to make a difference in a child's life. My brother happens to drive a bus also.

Angelus
Jan 17, 2004, 07:15 PM
I'm still in college. Still live at home but during the summer i work in the local hospital as a porter or as a mortuary assistant. The money's great which means i can enjoy the rest of the year.

Nermal
Jan 17, 2004, 07:31 PM
I write Windows software :(

I'm trying to talk the company into making Mac stuff too, I've managed to add Safari compatibility to their dynamic website, which is a start...

wdlove
Jan 17, 2004, 08:06 PM
Originally posted by Angelus
I'm still in college. Still live at home but during the summer i work in the local hospital as a porter or as a mortuary assistant. The money's great which means i can enjoy the rest of the year.

That is the kind of work that I did while attending nursing school. I worked assisitn another lady with supplies for the laboratory, cleaning pipetts, and autoclave for bacteriology. Maintained strorage of specimens from daily surgery and dictation by a pathologist and autopsies. The best part was working was working with the doctors. They loved have a person that wanted to learn.

Counterfit
Jan 17, 2004, 10:50 PM
Well, for now I just leech off my parents. Before I went to college, I was a cashier at a local grocery store, making $7 an hour. I think I might try to work at CompUSA this summer, or perhaps try to get a job as an assistant to a local pro photgrapher.

Mylstar
Jan 17, 2004, 11:32 PM
I sell and restore classic arcade video games/parts from the 80's.

http://www.mylstar.com

coopdog
Jan 18, 2004, 12:46 AM
Originally posted by Mylstar
I sell and restore classic arcade video games/parts from the 80's.

http://www.mylstar.com

I LOVE your game room!!! Thats is so cool!

coopdog
Jan 18, 2004, 12:50 AM
I got on top of my PC selling on ebay. I wish you could build G4's or G5's!

So does anyone want to buy a really good PC?! (http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=2781484188&category=52475&sspagename=STRK%3AMESSE%3AIT&rd=1) :D :D I'll throw in something extra for macrumors members. :D

manitoublack
Jan 18, 2004, 01:01 AM
I'm a second yeah Uni student (Mining Engineering,) but I work part time as a bike mechanic, and part time as a computer tech.

What little money I have goes into 1 of 4 things, my stereo, my bike, my computer or going out.

However not in that order.

big
Jan 18, 2004, 11:33 AM
question for all you PC techs.... why do they still use floppy drives????? even a zip is understandable, though a floppy?

raptorhigh
Jan 18, 2004, 12:04 PM
I don't make jack. I'm in my second year as an IT major at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County.

I spend my free time willing the IT market to recover. It has shown good signs; I think IBM has announced that they are going to hire nearly 15,000 people. I hope the market is restored by the time I'm done with school.

jefhatfield
Jan 18, 2004, 01:10 PM
my first official job was as a dishwasher when i was 15 a quarter of a century ago at the pizza place...it paid very little but i have been i jobs that paid nothing like being a vp of a silicon valley dot.com startup and i am lucky i didn't lose everything

today i have two businesses involving computers and landscaping...boring, but it's practical work that is recession proof and i have no desire to shoot for the moon in any high risk ventures like, he he, dot.com:p

jefhatfield
Jan 18, 2004, 01:22 PM
Originally posted by raptorhigh
I don't make jack. I'm in my second year as an IT major at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County.

I spend my free time willing the IT market to recover. It has shown good signs; I think IBM has announced that they are going to hire nearly 15,000 people. I hope the market is restored by the time I'm done with school.

the field is artificially down right now, so when you graduate, the field will be on the rise for a few years to come...your timing is excellent so don't worry

IT is more practical than straight ahead computer science or computer engineering and even when the field is down, there is always a need for network administrators, network engineers, database administrators, IT help desk, and computer desktop techs...and the pay, even for non college graduates, is very good compared to other industries

in a recent article i read in one of the major news magazines, the number one best job for the future was IT technician...jobs that used to hold that position like investment specialist, website designer, and programmer, have fallen way down in favor

keep an eye more on long term trends and then you will not get caught in some scheme like a dot.com startup or something related which can be risky...i only know of one person who made great money in this crazy time in silicon valley and he has to spend the rest of his life worrying about going to jail...things that were not against the law then are illegal now and the long arm of the law has no qualms about going after him years later...let's just say he was into advanced financial information as it related to high tech startups and loaning monies to various "projects"...he was a VC, not vietcong, but something far more dangerous to "america":p

Moxiemike
Jan 18, 2004, 02:02 PM
Originally posted by eyelikeart
aren't high school gigs the best? ;)

Don't I know it! Being a cafeteria worker and all, i get to take the leftover cold cheeseburgers that don't sell home to my wife and 6 kids.

eyelikeart
Jan 18, 2004, 02:11 PM
Originally posted by Moxiemike
Don't I know it! Being a cafeteria worker and all, i get to take the leftover cold cheeseburgers that don't sell home to my wife and 6 kids.

my fav is the shephard's pie... ;)

Blackstealth
Jan 18, 2004, 02:26 PM
Currently a final year Management student at University, making my cash working as a design consultant. Once I graduate in July I'm taking up a position as a senior graphic designer at a multimedia production company I did my internship with.

revenuee
Jan 18, 2004, 02:30 PM
I sell my body to women and i also deal
drugs

:D

Moxiemike
Jan 18, 2004, 03:07 PM
Originally posted by eyelikeart
my fav is the shephard's pie... ;)

Just remember to NEVER use the mayonniasse when I'm working.

eyelikeart
Jan 18, 2004, 03:20 PM
Originally posted by Moxiemike
Just remember to NEVER use the mayonniasse when I'm working.

eeewwww...I hate mayonaise... :eek:

Rower_CPU
Jan 18, 2004, 03:28 PM
I work at a mayonnaise factory. :(

latergator116
Jan 18, 2004, 03:33 PM
Death to mayonaise!! (basically eggs, disgusting!)

Anything with eggs in it is disgusting, except for cake...mmm...cake..

edesignuk
Jan 18, 2004, 03:43 PM
Originally posted by big
question for all you PC techs.... why do they still use floppy drives????? even a zip is understandable, though a floppy?
The only time I ever touch a floppy disk/drive is when a PC needs a rebuild, since builds are never done of CD. They are either bootable floppies that copy down a ghost image, or a bootable floppy to install from a network drive with a pre-configured build. Oh, and running diags, updating BIOS, other than that they are hardly touched, you would not believe how difficult it is to find a floppy disk when you need one :eek:

Mr. Anderson
Jan 18, 2004, 03:50 PM
Originally posted by Rower_CPU
I work at a mayonnaise factory. :(

Helman's/Best or Kraft?

I really don't like the sweet mayo like Kraft, Helman's is so much better. And the Lite version is fine - Growing up I used to eat an toasted onion bagel with american cheeses, dill pickle and mayo....

The trick was getting the bagel to melt the cheese just the right amount.

Oh, and all topped off with a big glass of milk! :D

Rower, can you get freebees?

D

tpjunkie
Jan 18, 2004, 04:00 PM
I've had several jobs, in high school I worked at my mothers pediatrics office for two summers filing old charts and moving charts older than 25 years into storage (for a 4 doctor practice, you'd be surpised how many thousands of files there are)...and as boring as the job was, I still got paid $7 an hour.

The summer before I left for college I worked at the minor league baseball stadium in my town....now that job just plain sucked. I was hired as a cashier, so my pay was only 5.50 but I'd be getting tips....I ended up actually cooking food and working the deep frier, which sucked a lot, and I was making less money than everyone else (they all got 6 to 8 an hour)...finally, with like 2 weekds left my complaining finally had some effect and I got moved to cashier.

Last summer I worked at my college doing summer research for the physics department, which paid quite handsomely, a 500 dollar paycheck (less taxes, of course) every 2 weeks, with me pretty much making my own hours, and my boss was my advisor, who was really laid back and let me do my own thing, including a 4 day tip to maine to meet some friends. The only thing bad about that job was living at school, which is in schenectady New York. So not only did I have no friends nearby, but there was nothing to do in the city itself (its a pretty nasty place, for those of you who've never seen it)

This winter break (7 weeks, trimesters RULE) I worked for my uncle as an intern at his brokerage firm, making minimum wage but at least it'll look good on a resume...plus the work wasn't too hard.

eyelikeart
Jan 18, 2004, 04:02 PM
Originally posted by Mr. Anderson
Rower, can you get freebees?


yeah...I like throwing jars of it at buildings for a good prank... :eek: :D

Rower_CPU
Jan 18, 2004, 06:33 PM
Come on guys, mayo's not that bad...after all, what's a sandwich without mayo?

I work for a smaller, Mom-n-Pop type place, and we take our product very seriously. I can get small jars (airplane/hotel sized) as freebies, but only if you promise not to vandalize anything with them. You wouldn't want eye to have to clean it up, now would you? :)

Stelliform
Jan 18, 2004, 06:36 PM
.....

bont
Jan 18, 2004, 06:46 PM
I'm glad to see a lot of people (esp the moderators) have got fairly ordinary jobs, I don't feel quite so inferior now :)

Nermal
Jan 18, 2004, 06:51 PM
Originally posted by Stelliform
Have you seen Undercover brother? I can't remember if the mayonnaise gag was on the web site or the movie. :D

Smart Brother: "Undercover brother, if you are going to penetrate white society you are going to have to learn to eat this and pretend you like it."
UnderCover Brother:"Awww No not Mayonnaise!"

It was on the movie. And for the record, I've got nothing against mayo.

Awimoway
Jan 18, 2004, 07:01 PM
Mmmmm. I love mayonnaise. And I don't mean that sugared Miracle Whip gray crap. Real mayo is the best part of any sandwich. Noodle salads, cole slaw, dip (mixed with other condiments) for all kinds of snack foods... they're all just an excuse to eat mayo, in my opinion.

And don't get me started on the joys of eggs. Lightly poached, lightly fried, with runny yolks, scrambled with cheese melted in...

Now I'm hungry. :D

eyelikeart
Jan 18, 2004, 07:05 PM
Originally posted by Rower_CPU
I can get small jars (airplane/hotel sized) as freebies, but only if you promise not to vandalize anything with them. You wouldn't want eye to have to clean it up, now would you? :)

Yeah, please don't make me clean up that mess. I know I'm being hypocritical here, but I feel I have rank being the janitor and all. ;)

eyelikeart
Jan 18, 2004, 07:06 PM
Originally posted by Stelliform
Have you seen Undercover brother? I can't remember if the mayonnaise gag was on the web site or the movie. :D


OMG...that nearly made me want to vomit!! :eek:

I remember that...and it was sooooo disgusting!!

Mudbug
Jan 18, 2004, 07:15 PM
I'm the Art Director and chief shape-designer at a rubber tubing factory in Shreveport. We make all sorts of tubing - hoses, pipes, garden devices, medical tubing, the works. There's no kind of tubing I can't handle. ;)

eyelikeart
Jan 18, 2004, 07:17 PM
Originally posted by Mudbug
I'm the Art Director and chief shape-designer at a rubber tubing factory in Shreveport. We make all sorts of tubing - hoses, pipes, garden devices, medical tubing, the works. There's no kind of tubing I can't handle. ;)

do u make the tubes hospitals use to pump someone's stomach?

I hate cleaning that mess up... :rolleyes:

Mudbug
Jan 18, 2004, 07:19 PM
well, that depends - esophogeal pumping, or rectal? We do both kinds - country and western. But nothing pumps as good as mayonnaise. Nothing.

wdlove
Jan 18, 2004, 07:24 PM
Originally posted by eyelikeart
eeewwww...I hate mayonaise... :eek:

I'm sorry to hear that eyelikeart. :( I agree that Hellman's is the best. I know that it isn't all the healthy, but it tastes sooooo goood!

"yeah...I like throwing jars of it at buildings for a good prank..." eyelikeart
It reminds me of David Letterman and his great joy of throwing all kind of objects off the Ed Sullivan Theater. You name it and it has been dropped. The best is the slowmotion replay, quat. I have always wondred about the cleanup though.

"Yeah, please don't make me clean up that mess. I know I'm being hypocritical here, but I feel I have rank being the janitor and all. " eyelikeart
With your comment it made me think, in my minds eye could just imagine that! :p

eyelikeart
Jan 18, 2004, 07:25 PM
Originally posted by Mudbug
well, that depends - esophogeal pumping, or rectal? We do both kinds - country and western. But nothing pumps as good as mayonnaise. Nothing.

The esophogeal pump mess is pretty gross I'll say. It gets really bad when I literally go thru 2 mops PLUS a wet-dry vac to get it all up.

However, I charge extra for rectal pump mess.

The damned mayo may pump well, but it's a royal pain to get out my mops. :(

Mudbug
Jan 18, 2004, 07:29 PM
But have you ever cleaned it off the inside of a bus? That corrugated flooring in the isle and the extruded aluminum grating on the emergency exit door at the back make it almost impossible to get it all off. But we make tubing that would probably work on your wet-dry vac that could get it done.

Grimace
Jan 18, 2004, 07:44 PM
I'm a "street pharmacist" :eek:

eyelikeart
Jan 18, 2004, 07:56 PM
Originally posted by Mudbug
But have you ever cleaned it off the inside of a bus? That corrugated flooring in the isle and the extruded aluminum grating on the emergency exit door at the back make it almost impossible to get it all off. But we make tubing that would probably work on your wet-dry vac that could get it done.

I've got a push broom for that. The wide length, combined with the stiff bristles make cleanup easy as pie. ;)

Mr. Anderson
Jan 18, 2004, 08:05 PM
Don't even get me started on cleaning up the bus :rolleyes: One day things got a little turbulent (speed bumps and fast breaking to avoid hitting a moron who cut in front of me) and one of the kids must have been sick and threw up all over the seat in front of her - on the kids there as well. Well, from there it was like a chain reaction - half a dozen others had a sympathy puke. Ugh! What a mess...

Mudbug - surgical tubing is awesome - as Rower knows, I have a nice big slingshot for tossing balls for my dog and one of the tubes broke. PM me and let me know how I can go about getting 10 yards or so of spare tubing, that would be fantastic!

D

wdlove
Jan 18, 2004, 08:06 PM
Originally posted by eyelikeart
I've got a push broom for that. The wide length, combined with the stiff bristles make cleanup easy as pie. ;)

Here is your title eyelikeart a "cleansing opperative." It reminds me of an old cartoon character with his boom and and a garbage can on his cart! :p

http://www.bbc.co.uk/kent/your_space/jobs/street_cleaner.shtml

I don't think that nurisng is a job that woudl work for you U eyelikeart. It actually involves actually cleaning up and caring for patients with their bodily discharges as U mentioned above.

mnkeybsness
Jan 18, 2004, 08:07 PM
my first job was a summer job detasseling corn (don't ask)... it paid good money and was only a 2-4 week summer job.

once i turned 16 i worked at a walgreens for a year.

after that i headed on over to join the cultists at my local best buy store... thought about quitting for a year and a half and finally did when it was time to go to college.

my freshman year of college i stayed unemployed for the first semester, and then picked up a job at the campus bowling alley.

last summer i worked construction building an ice arena back home, made a killing... about $600 a week.

when i was getting ready to come back to school, my boss at the campus bowling alley asked me to come back and be a student manager doing maintenance work. so that's my current position... it's just too bad the cute girls don't go bowling by themselves.

eyelikeart
Jan 18, 2004, 08:23 PM
Originally posted by Mr. Anderson
Well, from there it was like a chain reaction - half a dozen others had a sympathy puke. Ugh! What a mess...

as Rower knows, I have a nice big slingshot for tossing balls for my dog and one of the tubes broke.

Damned kids. It also really annoys me when they find "humor" in collecting dog poop & lighting it near doorways...SOMEBODY has to clean that up! :rolleyes:

I hope u get that slingshot back to working order...it was fun once I got the hang of it! ;)

latergator116
Jan 18, 2004, 09:13 PM
Originally posted by Mr. Anderson
Don't even get me started on cleaning up the bus :rolleyes: One day things got a little turbulent (speed bumps and fast breaking to avoid hitting a moron who cut in front of me) and one of the kids must have been sick and threw up all over the seat in front of her - on the kids there as well. Well, from there it was like a chain reaction - half a dozen others had a sympathy puke. Ugh! What a mess...

Mudbug - surgical tubing is awesome - as Rower knows, I have a nice big slingshot for tossing balls for my dog and one of the tubes broke. PM me and let me know how I can go about getting 10 yards or so of spare tubing, that would be fantastic!

D

Im verry sorry, I hope you didn't have to clean it up.

As I have said before, I have a vomiting phobia... even though I have a very strong stomach and I haven't thrown up in 7 or 8 years.

My teacher once told me a story of a time when his dad was giving pilot lessons. Anyhow, the kid he was giving lessons to threw up all over hm and on the plane's instruments. (Disgusting!) If that ever happened to me, I would be traumatized for at least a month.

wdlove
Jan 18, 2004, 09:37 PM
Originally posted by latergator116
Im verry sorry, I hope you didn't have to clean it up.

As I have said before, I have a vomiting phobia... even though I have a very strong stomach and I haven't thrown up in 7 or 8 years.

My teacher once told me a story of a time when his dad was giving pilot lessons. Anyhow, the kid he was giving lessons to threw up all over hm and on the plane's instruments. (Disgusting!) If that ever happened to me, I would be traumatized for at least a month.

I'm the same way latergator116. Can't remember the last time that I had an emesis. Quite frankly it is painful, at least it is for me. When I have observed patients having an emesis it always seemed so easy.

I feel for Mr. Anderson and your teacher. It is not an easy thing to deal with. Although it can be an occupational hazard. I would just imagine that just like in nursing, Mr. Anderson had to cleanup the mess. I admire him for the job that he does as I mentioned before.

revenuee
Jan 18, 2004, 09:41 PM
i have a weak stomach ... i throw up quite readily ... alcohol is not even a factor most times ... many times foods do me in ... i find it very easy too and i feel so good after it happens ...

Also ... i push myself really hard at the gym, or biking, or running ... i throw up happens all the time

jefhatfield
Jan 18, 2004, 09:44 PM
Originally posted by latergator116
Im verry sorry, I hope you didn't have to clean it up.

As I have said before, I have a vomiting phobia... even though I have a very strong stomach and I haven't thrown up in 7 or 8 years.

My teacher once told me a story of a time when his dad was giving pilot lessons. Anyhow, the kid he was giving lessons to threw up all over hm and on the plane's instruments. (Disgusting!) If that ever happened to me, I would be traumatized for at least a month.

irrational phobias suck...i loved playing water polo but i was scared of getting seasick from games and more importantly, i was scared of getting a boner in those small, small speedos (it happens for no reason) and sticking out two full inches out of the top of the speedo is not a sight i would want to share with the rest of my high school...one poor diving guy had this happen while he had to make a dive and the yearbook committee caught it on film and put it into the yearbook and put down the caption "moby dick?"...poor guy was at least an 8 or 9 incher

...i think he left the country shortly after:D :p

Squire
Jan 18, 2004, 09:53 PM
Conversation. That's what I teach.

Well, actually, I teach listening and speaking skills to freshman university students. I've been doing it for 8 years now...to the DAY. It's great. The salary isn't anything to brag about but the five months of paid vacation sure is. ;)

I also do a little bit of recruiting here so if you know someone with a uni degree and a sense of adventure, I might be able to help them find a job. (Although, i have to admit, I haven't done much in the way recruiting lately.)

Originally posted by iAlan
Anyway, after graduating, I came to Japan and was teaching English for about a year (again my friends thought I was crazy). After a uear I got into a semi-management possition at a large teaching gripu (they are all over the world and well recognized) I was training teachers on presentation skills, interviewing and managing teacher schedules.

I think I'll have to move on to a different segment here some day, too. Ideally, I'd like to get a gig with Samsung, Hyundai, or LG. That way, I might have the option of moving back home.

Squire

latergator116
Jan 18, 2004, 10:00 PM
Originally posted by jefhatfield
irrational phobias suck...i loved playing water polo but i was scared of getting seasick from games and more importantly, i was scared of getting a boner in those small, small speedos (it happens for no reason) and sticking out two full inches out of the top of the speedo is not a sight i would want to share with the rest of my high school...one poor diving guy had this happen while he had to make a dive and the yearbook committee caught it on film and put it into the yearbook and put down the caption "moby dick?"...poor guy was at least an 8 or 9 incher

...i think he left the country shortly after:D :p

Yeah, sometimes when you think to yourself "gee... I hope I don't get a boner", you start to get one" This happens to me in class all the time, and the pretty girl sitting next to me doesn't help the situation either.

They should make a product that essentially does the opposite of Viagra. It should be called "Viashrink". Id sure buy it.

revenuee
Jan 18, 2004, 10:45 PM
Originally posted by latergator116
Yeah, sometimes when you think to yourself "gee... I hope I don't get a boner", you start to get one" This happens to me in class all the time, and the pretty girl sitting next to me doesn't help the situation either.

They should make a product that essentially does the opposite of Viagra. It should be called "Viashrink". Id sure buy it.

Umm, umm - baseball, cold showers , margaret thatcher naked on a cold day, margaret thatcher naked on a cold day.

I had that problem till i was about 15 or 16, it goes away as your hormones start to balance out.

As far as speedo and water polo ... as a swimmer i use to wear speedo's in training and races ... but i must say i never had trouble with an errection, that water was to damn cold.

as far as the diver who had the 8 inch erection ... man i wouldn't leave the country... LOL ... be proud to sport that think around ... haha

anyway ... since no one liked my

selling my body and dealing drugs comment as a job

the truth is, i'm in first year and going to major in studying communication ie popular culture analysis - (film and music critique/analysis) as well as mass communication (politics/propaganda/advertising)

as far as work ... i bounce around ... i worked freelance as a wedding videographer, i've done a little photography work, as well as graphics/web work ...

i have a steady gig working at my dads clinic taking care of random tasks, deliveries, or whatever else needs to be done. - the pay gets me by for most things ---

themadchemist
Jan 19, 2004, 12:35 AM
Originally posted by Awimoway
My dream is to be a novelist. So I chose a dead-end major in college: English. Actually, it helped my writing a lot, but it's not exactly a lucrative job finder. I graduated last summer and did not find anything in my area in editing or technical writing, which had been my hope. I am currently unemployed.

However, I have broken down and am going the way of my parents, even though I always told myself I would hate to do their job: school teacher. Although they teach elementary, which I would never do. I'll be starting as a substitute teacher as early as next week, and will be taking night classes to get my teaching credential. By this summer, I should have a regular job as a high school English teacher. Alas. It'll be okay though. The reason I never wanted to be a teacher of anything below college level (and even then) was because I don't enjoy talking to or teaching people who don't want to learn. I have two sisters-in-law who are both doing first-year internships as teachers (one elem, one high school drama) and are surprised to find that they don't really like it. But I know why they don't like it, and I think this will be the secret to my, er, not success but tolerance of the job: lowered expectations. Most of the kids are there because they have to be. I understand that. Me too. I won't be there to entertain them, to get them to like me, or even to command their rapt attention at every moment. And I'll hold no delusions that anyone wants to learn: the dumb kids are there because they have to be, the smart kids because they want good grades (any actual learning is incidental).

Yeah, yeah. I know. Really inspiring, huh? :o My get-out-of-jail card will either be my writing or I may go to law school in a few years.

I'm sure you'd be just fine in a profession you enjoy, but no offense, I wish people like you weren't compelled to become teachers by any sort of necessity. Education is very important and those disgruntled teachers who are there to earn their paychecks and get our are generally ascorbic, frustrating, and unbearable. Their presence in the profession does not harken well for education in this country.

eyelikeart
Jan 19, 2004, 12:41 AM
Originally posted by wdlove
I would just imagine that just like in nursing, Mr. Anderson had to cleanup the mess. I admire him for the job that he does as I mentioned before.

I admire him for being able to put up with driving them around as well. I know I wouldn't have the patience.

I prefer to do my duties between classes & after hours...that way I can sneak in some booze while on the job. ;)

Awimoway
Jan 19, 2004, 02:24 AM
Originally posted by Mudbug
But have you ever cleaned it off the inside of a bus? That corrugated flooring in the isle and the extruded aluminum grating on the emergency exit door at the back make it almost impossible to get it all off. But we make tubing that would probably work on your wet-dry vac that could get it done.


I don't think that's mayo you're cleaning up. ;)


:D


Originally posted by themadchemist
I'm sure you'd be just fine in a profession you enjoy, but no offense, I wish people like you weren't compelled to become teachers by any sort of necessity. Education is very important and those disgruntled teachers who are there to earn their paychecks and get our are generally ascorbic, frustrating, and unbearable. Their presence in the profession does not harken well for education in this country.

Fair enough, but maybe if people in this country would be less tightfisted and self-centered, we would pay public servants like teachers, police officers, firemen, and our military servicemen in a manner that reflects the heroism they perform on society's behalf day in and day out. And then maybe you'd get more talent in each of those professions. Of course, you'd get more hacks, too, but that's no excuse for our ill service to the many great ones.

As it is, there is actually quite a shortage of teachers in many parts of the country.

In any case, I hope you understood that I was being a little tongue-in-cheek. Teaching may not have been my first or even my second choice, and I may not be the most charismatic teacher, but I actually hope and believe that I will be one teacher students won't forget--for good reasons (at least for the few that actually do pay attention ;)). Because there is a lot of things I wish I had been taught in high school English that I never was. Basic, fundamental things that can enable people to get more fulfillment out of life because they can comfortably and confidently approach not just literature but art of all kinds and be able to discern between the good and the bad, to interpret, to develop an interior dialogue with the artist and discover real insights about their lives.

I always felt like high school literature was supposed to be giving me deep thoughts but I was too dumb to know how. And that's pretty much true. It's actually very easy. But why didn't anyone teach it to us? I have come to have something of a Marxist regard for public education in America. It's meant for middle and lower classes and it's designed to keep their minds a content, industrious, uncreative mush. Anyway, if I can share the simple yet demanding skills of art appreciation, then I think I will have accomplished something very meaningful.

And I hope not just to have an impact in literature, but in language, too. Maybe I can do some good saving a few kids from developing that obnoxious pedantry that is so common in the English-speaking world where issues of usage and grammar are concerned.

Anyway, I could go on. My point is that I am not thrilled to be a teacher, but I hope to be as good as I can be at whatever I do. :)

JDar
Jan 19, 2004, 01:20 PM
I'm an ophthalmologist--went to school way too long mainly to learn how to spell it--recently retired to full time life and loving it.

A mountain bike is more fun than sitting in the dark with a laser or peering through a microscope. Love those gadgets, though.

sethypoo
Jan 19, 2004, 01:30 PM
Well, being a student, employment is limited in terms of pay amount.

I work at our local Burger King whenever they need me.....I wouldn't say I'm a manager (I don't ever want to be) but I am constantly "on call". I know, sounds pathetic, but they get pretty busy, and every now and then someones doesn't show up to their shift, so they call Seth, because Seth has nothing to do when they call.....ah, whatever.

I'm pursuing a Masters degree in clinical psychology right now. I hope they pay more than $7.25 an hour. :)

Woohoo! 500th post! Yes! I am a 6502!

isus
Jan 19, 2004, 01:58 PM
i work on computers
- but i don't advertise much, so i usually work for friends. and i give them a nice discount
i work at a grocery store
-$6.50 an hour, 24 hours a week (average). after tax: $120 i think. i should be getting a raise soon though.

and i get the normal money for xmas and birthdays and good grades and what not.

krimson
Jan 19, 2004, 02:02 PM
i draw pretty little maps for use on our geocoding system, and in the offtime, i look up my friends to see how much they make, their credit ratings, etc.. and when im not doing that, i watch the planes land and take off from LAX.

mactastic
Jan 19, 2004, 02:09 PM
Well, I started working construction when I was 16 before that it was odd jobs and working around my parents place. I'd work construction as a laborer in the summer and save the money for the school year. Then I needed more regular income, so I worked for a restaurant affectionatly known as "Crapo's" for a couple years. Moved to Az. and worked at Sun Devil Stadium doing maintenance during the week and security during games. Got to tell the drunks to "respect my authority"! But private security work gets lame fast, so when I moved back to Ca I went to work in the glorious field of reprographics at a place called Kinko's. Worked various print and copy jobs for the next 9 years while I returned to school and got my degree in Architecture. While in school I also worked part time in the support shop helping freshmen with the tablesaws, welding torches, and all manner of metal and woodworking tools. Just graduated in August, got a job in December working for a developer designing high-end residential stuff, then working with the construction superintendant to schedule and complete the projects. I guess I got lucky with this job, but I also was perfectly qualified for it with my design degree and construction management minor and construction experience.

Counterfit
Jan 19, 2004, 02:12 PM
Originally posted by mactastic
Moved to Az. and worked at Sun Devil Stadium doing maintenance during the week and security during games. Got to tell the drunks to "respect my authority"! Ever consider working security during a Sox/Yanks game at Fenway?:D

themadchemist
Jan 19, 2004, 02:14 PM
Originally posted by Awimoway

Fair enough, but maybe if people in this country would be less tightfisted and self-centered, we would pay public servants like teachers, police officers, firemen, and our military servicemen in a manner that reflects the heroism they perform on society's behalf day in and day out. And then maybe you'd get more talent in each of those professions. Of course, you'd get more hacks, too, but that's no excuse for our ill service to the many great ones.


Very true, I agree. We could definitely do better about paying such individuals more, especially teachers. And while the other professions already have no shortage of qualified and respectable individuals, teaching is in the unique position of being filled largely with incompetent people. Perhaps a higher salary could attract the more able. After all, grade school teaching right now seems to be the easy road to take, many times, for those who do not have the ability to succeed in other fields. I'd like to see people entering teaching because they love it, and doing so with higher degrees than simply a Bachelor's. I remember high school--I could have done a much better job teaching some of those classes than my teachers. Sure, there were great, knowledgeable teachers, but only a few, amidst a sea of useless, insipid fools.

Originally posted by Awimoway

As it is, there is actually quite a shortage of teachers in many parts of the country.


This is true, but I do not believe that this should be an excuse for the high tolerance for idiocy and apathy that we currently accept in the teaching profession. In many countries, teachers are respected to almost the point of holiness, and they perform their duties in a manner apt to receive such adulation.

Originally posted by Awimoway

In any case, I hope you understood that I was being a little tongue-in-cheek. Teaching may not have been my first or even my second choice, and I may not be the most charismatic teacher, but I actually hope and believe that I will be one teacher students won't forget--for good reasons (at least for the few that actually do pay attention ;)). Because there is a lot of things I wish I had been taught in high school English that I never was. Basic, fundamental things that can enable people to get more fulfillment out of life because they can comfortably and confidently approach not just literature but art of all kinds and be able to discern between the good and the bad, to interpret, to develop an interior dialogue with the artist and discover real insights about their lives.

It is my fault for not having seen that your comment was tongue-in-cheek. I missed the sarcasm because I know that the opinion you expressed is one that many teachers very truly evince. Often, when people make statements like yours about the teaching profession, they are not being facetious in the least.

You actually sound like you could be quite the teacher and I am glad that you do want to make an impact (however small) on your students (however few). Perhaps you'll even find that you enjoy it.

I always felt like high school literature was supposed to be giving me deep thoughts but I was too dumb to know how. And that's pretty much true. It's actually very easy. But why didn't anyone teach it to us? I have come to have something of a Marxist regard for public education in America. It's meant for middle and lower classes and it's designed to keep their minds a content, industrious, uncreative mush. Anyway, if I can share the simple yet demanding skills of art appreciation, then I think I will have accomplished something very meaningful.

And I hope not just to have an impact in literature, but in language, too. Maybe I can do some good saving a few kids from developing that obnoxious pedantry that is so common in the English-speaking world where issues of usage and grammar are concerned.

Anyway, I could go on. My point is that I am not thrilled to be a teacher, but I hope to be as good as I can be at whatever I do. :)

It is my fault for not having seen that your comment was tongue-in-cheek. I missed the sarcasm because I know that the opinion you expressed is one that many teachers very truly evince. Often, when people make statements like yours about the teaching profession, they are not being facetious in the least.

You actually sound like you could be quite the teacher and I am glad that you do want to make an impact (however small) on your students (however few). Perhaps you'll even find that you enjoy it.

Best of luck with this new profession. Often, the most unexpected turns in life are the most delightful.

mactastic
Jan 19, 2004, 02:21 PM
Originally posted by Counterfit
Ever consider working security during a Sox/Yanks game at Fenway?:D

Lol, no thanks!

Squire
Jan 19, 2004, 04:28 PM
Originally posted by themadchemist
... Perhaps a higher salary could attract the more able. After all, grade school teaching right now seems to be the easy road to take, many times, for those who do not have the ability to succeed in other fields. I'd like to see people entering teaching because they love it, and doing so with higher degrees than simply a Bachelor's. I remember high school--I could have done a much better job teaching some of those classes than my teachers. Sure, there were great, knowledgeable teachers, but only a few, amidst a sea of useless, insipid fools.

Teachers definitely could use a pay hike. My mom taught for 35 years and, even in the years before retirement, never had an enviable salary. That probably would attract more talent.

Reading your post, I felt quite lucky. Most of my teachers (in high school, at least) were amazing. My physics teacher, for instance, had a PhD and had designed some piece of equipment that went to the moon!

In many countries, teachers are respected to almost the point of holiness, and they perform their duties in a manner apt to receive such adulation.

Can you give a specific example? I'm sure your statement is true in some places but, for the most part, I believe this is mostly myth.

Squire

Counterfit
Jan 19, 2004, 04:48 PM
Originally posted by Squire
Teachers definitely could use a pay hike. My mom taught for 35 years and, even in the years before retirement, never had an enviable salary. That probably would attract more talent. Exactly. My parents have been teaching 30/31 years, and make aboyt $60k each. My brother just started a job in August writing printer drivers for Windows. His starting salary is $48k. Something wrong there? :confused:

mactastic
Jan 19, 2004, 05:00 PM
Would be nice to eliminate the idea of tenure for teachers. Paying for performance would go a long way to solving the apathy problem among educators. Problem is how do you judge performance?

Right now good teachers have little incentive beyond personal pride to be better than their peers. And many teachers would be considered 'deadwood' in a private organization, lacking ambition or drive. But because the state can't fire them for being mediocre or worse, and because many of the people who thrive under a reward-for-hard-work system get fed up and leave for a job where their hard work WILL get rewarded, the teaching system becomes a haven for people who only want to work nine months a year. That benefits neither the student nor the school system. There is some truth to the insulting slur against teachers that goes "Those who can, do; those that can't, teach."

latergator116
Jan 19, 2004, 07:22 PM
Originally posted by revenuee
i have a weak stomach ... i throw up quite readily ... alcohol is not even a factor most times ... many times foods do me in ... i find it very easy too and i feel so good after it happens ...

Also ... i push myself really hard at the gym, or biking, or running ... i throw up happens all the time

Well I hope you don't throw up TOO much. It is actually very unhealthy for you. The acids in your stomach are harmful to your gum and teath, as well as your throat. This is why bulimic people often have rotted teeth/gums.

revenuee
Jan 19, 2004, 07:50 PM
Originally posted by latergator116
Well I hope you don't throw up TOO much. It is actually very unhealthy for you. The acids in your stomach are harmful to your gum and teath, as well as your throat. This is why bulimic people often have rotted teeth/gums.

It's not something i like to do ... the problem is that i had/have acid reflux, i went on meds ... i've been okay for the last 6 months -- well with the exception of when i over do it with booze :D

Squire
Jan 19, 2004, 09:08 PM
I haven't thrown up in about 25 years. Come close on several hundred occasions, though. I do have a problem with having to constantly clear my throat, though. I was out drinking with an ENT specialist one night and he thought that the sphincter (not THAT one) in my throat might not be completely closing or something. I should get it checked out.

And I have no idea how that's related to thread. ;)

Squire

MacBandit
Jan 20, 2004, 12:48 AM
Hmm somehow I've missed this thread. Well along with a few hundred dozen others lately.

In anycase I am currently unemployed living on unemployment.

Prior to being unemployed I was Service Manager at a local BMW Motorcycle shop prior to them closing. I worked there for 7 years and was Service Manager for about 4 of that. The good news is they are opening a new shop in town and I should have some part time work with them prior to the official oppening in a few months. Once they are open I will continue my title as Service Manager.

I had planned on getting into the Forrest Service and finishing school through them after the shop closed. I had no interest in going back into the bikes do to my experience with the last owner and his interactions with BMW. Now that I have been away from it a while and this new guy is opening the shop I reconsidered. I really like this new guy and he's doing a shop the way a shop should be done. So if you're ever in Eugene we should be open by the end of May. Come by and see what a BMW motorcycle shop is all about.

Counterfit
Jan 20, 2004, 02:42 PM
How much of a sales boost do you guys get when a BMX bike wins Paris-Dakar? Or is it a bit too obscure in this country for anyone to care/notice?

robbieduncan
Jan 20, 2004, 02:45 PM
Originally posted by Counterfit
How much of a sales boost do you guys get when a BMX bike wins Paris-Dakar? Or is it a bit too obscure in this country for anyone to care/notice?

Erm what? A BMX is a push bike yes? The Dakar rally (which did not start in Paris this year so is not called the Paris-Dakar) is competed in by cars, trucks and motor bikes. I think the bike race was one by a guy on a KTM...

MacBandit
Jan 20, 2004, 02:48 PM
Originally posted by Counterfit
How much of a sales boost do you guys get when a BMX bike wins Paris-Dakar? Or is it a bit too obscure in this country for anyone to care/notice?

When the BMW motorcycles won not much. Really I would be surpised if .001% of the US population even knew what the Dakar Rally is.

It was truly a great race this year. Oh, wait it was last year also and the year before. Ah, hell there's never been a bad Dakar in my memory.

jefhatfield
Jan 20, 2004, 03:11 PM
Originally posted by Squire
I haven't thrown up in about 25 years. Come close on several hundred occasions, though. I do have a problem with having to constantly clear my throat, though. I was out drinking with an ENT specialist one night and he thought that the sphincter (not THAT one) in my throat might not be completely closing or something. I should get it checked out.

And I have no idea how that's related to thread. ;)

Squire

i just learned something interesting about sphincters the other day while watching jue johanssen the sex specialist on the oxygen network...all people have two butt sphinters...i found that to be great news and found out i have another body part...it was almost as great as the discovery i found out that a person has two kidneys and could live with only one

but with only one butt sphincter, we would poop all over ourselves and not be able to control our farts...and you know, on these boards, especially the political and war discussions section, fart and hot gas control are extrememly importan:p

idkew
Jan 20, 2004, 05:55 PM
Originally posted by job
i make money watching pretty ladies swim....

:p

exactly what i did in high school. i think lifeguards are the ones who pushed for mirrored sun glasses.

patrick0brien
Jan 20, 2004, 07:16 PM
-All

tpjunkie and revenuee pointed this thread out to me, so here I am.

I make my money being a 'Management and Technology Consultant'.

In the most basic terms, companies pay me to introduce them to technological ideas regarding software and hardware, install them and actually help the company integrate the new solutions into Standard Operating Procedure.

This is more than an IT guy coming in and installing a software package, it's the entire solution: Selling a company on the idea, pulling the softwares and hardwares together to realize this vision, perform assessments, requirements gathering, create ironclad processes that apply to short, medium and long-term (that's the hard part) success, plan and execute the project, reengineer existing processes to accommodate the new ones, actually putting the pieces together - adapted to not only the industry of the client, but the particulars of the client's business (politics, structure, etc.), installing and testing the solution, and to succeed myself out of a job.

God. I am such a consultant :rolleyes:

bryanc
Jan 20, 2004, 07:18 PM
It seems we have quite a diversity of careers around here.

For the record, I'm currently a postdoctoral researcher doing developmental biology (molecular/cell biology of zebrafish development) at the University of Alberta.

After completing an undergraduate degree in genetics, 10 years of graduate school, and 3 years of postdoctoral work, I'm currently making almost enough to pay my rent regularly.

I used to do systems analysis/software development/consulting work (back in the '80s) and made embarrassing sums of money. But I found it boring and decided to follow my passion (everyone always tells young people to follow their dreams or some such rubbish) and became a scientist. Even if I ever manage to get a faculty job, I'll never again make as much as I made in 1987, and I've been working much harder ever since. I do have to admit I'm no longer bored, and I do love my work, but seriously consider just how big a financial sacrifice you're willing to make in order to do something you really enjoy.

Cheers

job
Jan 20, 2004, 07:28 PM
Originally posted by idkew
i think lifeguards are the ones who pushed for mirrored sun glasses.

hah. you have no idea.... :eek: :D

for the coming summer (mid-May through early Sept. for me) i've lined up two jobs, head guard at a pool (essentially a manager) and cashier at a new barnes and nobles supercenter. i'm trying to save/earn as much money as i can before going to college.

bannedagain
Jan 20, 2004, 08:01 PM
Originally posted by big
question for all you PC techs.... why do they still use floppy drives????? even a zip is understandable, though a floppy?

Why do we still use the CD? When SACD, HD-DVD, DVD-A, and even DVD are available.

Answer: It's the fallback standard, everyones got one, and it's good enough to transfere word files around an office.

revenuee
Jan 20, 2004, 08:01 PM
Originally posted by patrick0brien
-All

tpjunkie and revenuee pointed this thread out to me, so here I am.

I make my money being a 'Management and Technology Consultant'.

In the most basic terms, companies pay me to introduce them to technological ideas regarding software and hardware, install them and actually help the company integrate the new solutions into Standard Operating Procedure.

This is more than an IT guy coming in and installing a software package, it's the entire solution: Selling a company on the idea, pulling the softwares and hardwares together to realize this vision, perform assessments, requirements gathering, create ironclad processes that apply to short, medium and long-term (that's the hard part) success, plan and execute the project, reengineer existing processes to accommodate the new ones, actually putting the pieces together - adapted to not only the industry of the client, but the particulars of the client's business (politics, structure, etc.), installing and testing the solution, and to succeed myself out of a job.

God. I am such a consultant :rolleyes:

Now thats a pretty sweet gig ...

revenuee
Jan 20, 2004, 08:15 PM
Originally posted by bannedagain
Why do we still use the CD? When SACD, HD-DVD, DVD-A, and even DVD are available.

Answer: It's the fallback standard, everyones got one, and it's good enough to transfere word files around an office.

Well there was a big deal about when the floppy was dropped, now i don't think anyone even notices.

hell i don't have files smaller then 5 MB .. unless it's like a final cut pro saved file ... but then everything that links to it is usually 40 gigs :)

and about getting a word file around ...

email ... even an the office is much faster

patrick0brien
Jan 21, 2004, 12:16 AM
Originally posted by revenuee
Now thats a pretty sweet gig ...

-revenuee

Well it certainly isn't boring, and the pay is damn good.

There there is another shoe that drops.
1. I get gross earnings, meaning I own Uncle Sam my taxes every quarter, and it sure is painful paying out of one's own account, instead of it being withheld.
2. No benefits
3. I bill by the hour, meaning like a lawyer, I don't earn when I'm not billing on a project.
3. I don't know how long I will be on a project - I could be released at any and every moment.

But, I'm crazy. I love this stuff. Probably because I'm actually building something, not just perpetuating the status quo.

But hey! I'm finally done for the night! Woo hoo! Time for bed!

Note: It really shouldn't have taken me this long, but I watched a bit to much TV and www.stupidvideos.com

revenuee
Jan 21, 2004, 01:34 AM
Originally posted by patrick0brien
-revenuee

Well it certainly isn't boring, and the pay is damn good.

There there is another shoe that drops.
1. I get gross earnings, meaning I own Uncle Sam my taxes every quarter, and it sure is painful paying out of one's own account, instead of it being withheld.
2. No benefits
3. I bill by the hour, meaning like a lawyer, I don't earn when I'm not billing on a project.
3. I don't know how long I will be on a project - I could be released at any and every moment.

But, I'm crazy. I love this stuff. Probably because I'm actually building something, not just perpetuating the status quo.

But hey! I'm finally done for the night! Woo hoo! Time for bed!

Note: It really shouldn't have taken me this long, but I watched a bit to much TV and www.stupidvideos.com

My Dad's a vet ... and the way vet practices work in Ontario at least is that your self employed (much like you) and your perform a service for the clinic in question and you get paid and then you take care of your own taxes ... you can write off a lot of stuff as business expenses so you end up keeping more of your money, but at the same time, you have no pension, or health benefits.

true777
Jan 21, 2004, 09:11 AM
I teach student sections in Computer-Human Interaction at Stanford while finishing up my Ph.D., and I also do paid HCI research for Stanford-industry collaborations (mostly Silicon Valley high tech stuff).

mactastic
Jan 21, 2004, 09:40 AM
Originally posted by patrick0brien
But, I'm crazy. I love this stuff. Probably because I'm actually building something, not just perpetuating the status quo.

Thankfully I feel the same way. I love being involved in building things, only I get to build stuff that should be around (fingers crossed the structural calcs are solid) for at least 50 years. Designing and building stuff is the best. Sometimes I can't believe I get paid to do what I do! :p

jefhatfield
Jan 21, 2004, 09:45 AM
Originally posted by patrick0brien
-revenuee

Well it certainly isn't boring, and the pay is damn good.

There there is another shoe that drops.
1. I get gross earnings, meaning I own Uncle Sam my taxes every quarter, and it sure is painful paying out of one's own account, instead of it being withheld.
2. No benefits
3. I bill by the hour, meaning like a lawyer, I don't earn when I'm not billing on a project.
3. I don't know how long I will be on a project - I could be released at any and every moment.

But, I'm crazy. I love this stuff. Probably because I'm actually building something, not just perpetuating the status quo.

But hey! I'm finally done for the night! Woo hoo! Time for bed!

Note: It really shouldn't have taken me this long, but I watched a bit to much TV and www.stupidvideos.com

for us techies, there is always the question of having potentially great pay and less security *as in self employed

...or having a low paying job in an IT department and working 9-5 and possibly always having evenings and weekends off...most of the time

when i first started as a technician, i worked for other people and did interniship level stuff at companies and one of my bosses worked m-f and never on the weekends...he was loved by all the women in the company because he ran the hardware side of the IT department and he got to play hero...at the time four years ago, he got paid less than ten dollars an hour but he got paid for forty hours, even when there was nothing to do and he got full medical benefits and paid vacations and short of showing up to work naked, this guy cannot get fired
the main drawback to this kind of job is that the technicians in his department have to either get certified, get a degree of some sort, or at the very least go through company sponsored trainings which are mandatory

after working for "others", i met a few self employed techinicians and they made two, three, five, and even eleven times what my old boss made per hour...but there was never a guaranteed forty hours a week, no paid vacations, and no medical benefits...these self employed techs all had to deal with either hustling up accounts, paying for expensive print and tv ads, and even dealing with a monthly rent for an office or computer store or computer repair business storefront
...the good thing is that none of these techs were forced to do trainings, and they didn't have to have certifications and degrees but many got both and it wasn't uncommon for some self employed techs to have master's and phd's in computer science or a related field

i love being self employed but i have to admit, i do not have the guts right now to borrow a half a million dollars or more for a proper storefront but the techies who do go the distance are the ones who get paid off...but in the very long run

if someone wanted to have a niche retail store or a restaurant in the right location, they would most likely fare much better and recover their investment much more quickly than a computer store and repair center...i think techies who decide to go the full distance and have a full line of computer retail gear and software, and have a whole slew of technicians under them, and a competant sales force do this field primarily because it's what they know how to do...not because they think it's a quick way to make a lot of money

when you work for someone else, there is always the knowledge that there is a limit to what you can make and it is hard to jump to the next level...i have a relative that entered the techie field and is now self employed and makes onlyu commission on techie sales and repairs...very stressful and not at all glamorous but 500k a year and that is a great living even if uncle sam comes along to claim 40 percent in taxes...even with great writeoffs

i knew one technician near silicon valley who started a software company selling other people's software making a full service installation and maintenace agreement for a business and did consulting as well for these companies for their best package in equipment and software....he also was an accountant and mba so he was able to pitch some good accounts...he made millions a year and even more when he played with dot.com...but when that went south, so did he and he had to file for bankruptcy...and that is another danger of being self employed

the best example of a self employed person i have ever talked to was this old man who used to come into the hardware store i worked at when i was a kid...he called himself dave and he decided to make a region that grew fruit trees into a region that dabbled in computers and software...he liked to tell people how he started this from his garage and how everyone should be self employed and in tech...his last name was packard;)

jazzmfk
Jan 21, 2004, 10:24 AM
Hey! Fascinating thread. Lots of variety!

I've got three ways that I make money. Here they are, in reverse quantity order...

1. Freelance musician. I'm a lead trumpet player - you know, the high note guy - currently in a contemporary big band and a killer Blues Brothers cover band. Almost no cash, but way too much fun.

2. Arranger/composer. Believe it or not, the high school marching band/drum and bugle corps market is kinda lucrative. (one summer I practically killed myself writing 10 marching band shows but didn't mind the 30 grand at all....) Don't do nearly as much of this anymore now that I have a family.

3. High school music teacher/director of bands. (quick aside: I agree with a lot of the teacher bashing that was mentioned in earlier posts - for most subjects, it is pretty easy to be a bad teacher, and there's no incentive to be better. Now, you could argue that music is not as important as other subjects [I wouldn't, but you might], but we've got a number of things motivating us to do better every year. Most high schools compete with at least one ensemble, where technically you aren't judged against another band but against a perfect performance. This keeps pressure on you to improve. Plus, unlike most subjects, we keep our students for four years, constantly demonstrating improvement in a public forum like a concert. We get to pick our repertoire, though, so we learn as much as we want to learn. I can't imagine being an English teacher with a strict, forced curriculum - how boring!)

Sorry this was so long, but I thought it was pertinent. Oh, well, back to class! (thanks to me, the music fundamentals class utilizes the only Macs in the district! Time to try to convert some young minds from the dark side! Garage band might help!)