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MacBytes
Sep 28, 2008, 10:21 PM
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Category: Tunes
Link: Walmart: all your music are belong to us (http://www.macbytes.com/link.php?sid=20080928232153)
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Posted on MacBytes.com (http://www.macbytes.com)
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donga
Sep 28, 2008, 11:48 PM
i don't think very many people bought walmart drm'd tracks in the first place...

hotshotharry
Sep 29, 2008, 12:24 AM
So as long as only a few people get screwed over for buying " legal " music it's ok ? :eek:

All the more reason to avoid drm media that you plan to keep. Apple is no different... :D

DMann
Sep 29, 2008, 02:13 AM
i don't think very many people bought walmart drm'd tracks in the first place...

A Class Action Lawsuit for deceptive advertising will emerge from this. The smaller the group, the more cash each one shall receive. This is outrageous, and seems somewhat similar to what Windows pulled with their own discontinued PlayForSure format. This bait and switch behavior is a common strategy among multi-billion dollar companies such as Wal-Mart and MS. Pitiful.

jburgme
Sep 29, 2008, 06:37 AM
Before Amazon opened its store, I would use Walmart to find a handful of songs that iTunes didn't have. Even fewer (I think I can count on one hand) had DRM. Since I wanted to play them on my iPod and my Mac, I converted them on the spot using a rewritable disc and a CD burner.

Considering the iPod/iPhone's market share, the iPod/iPhone's inability to play WMA, Walmart hasn't sold DRM'ed WMA tracks for six months, and the number of people who still use WMA players with DRM'ed WMA music, there's really no reason to keep their authorization servers running. Especially considering how easy it is to convert WMA to MP3 using rewritable discs.

From the article (italics added by me): "Walmart is basically switching off the DRM servers when, as far as anyone can tell, it would be pretty trivial to keep them up just in the name of good service."

As far as anyone can tell is newsspeak for "We don't know how much it costs, so we'll just assume it's free." Just because its a multi-billion dollar corporation doesn't mean they should throw money away at something whose cost outweighs its benefit.

It's also interesting that people consider this a bad thing while at the same time claiming DRM should go away. If DRM goes away, this is how it happens: DRM servers get shut down.

g4cubed
Sep 29, 2008, 06:46 AM
Just another reason to hate/not shop Wally-mart.

nagromme
Sep 29, 2008, 10:51 AM
It's also interesting that people consider this a bad thing while at the same time claiming DRM should go away. If DRM goes away, this is how it happens: DRM servers get shut down.

That's only how it happens if the company CHOOSES to mis-handle the situation. And that's a great reason why DRM should go away: we don't want our purchased music to be at the mercy of big companies' future bad decisions.

There's no reason DRM authorization servers HAVE to be shut down just because DRM sales end. They don't even need much bandwidth.

I'd love to see the big labels allow Apple to switch over completely to DRM-free iTunes Plus. But I'd expect Apple to keep their authorization system turned on for past customers for many years to come.

That's treating your customers right, unlike the choice that Wal-Mart and Microsoft have made. (Anyone know whether Yahoo! is keeping their DRM servers up after closing their service?)

Eventually--years from now, when storage is even cheaper/smaller and big media files are even easier to store, I intend to re-rip my protected iTunes as Apple Lossless (or other lossless format). No double-compression loss that way (only the original encoding loss I already hear--not that I notice). And if storage is still tight, I could always archive that and re-encode from Apple Lossless to a really high bitrate (512 AAC/MP4?) that may as well be lossless. We're talking years down the road, though--I even hope for automated tools to help someday.

Until then, I expect Apple to keep their DRM authorization system working--and I predict that they will. (I also predict that the record labels will force Apple to keep selling DRM for a long time, as a way to push customers into competing stores and reduce Apple's scary power in the industry.)

PowerFullMac
Sep 29, 2008, 10:53 AM
Its for reasons like this people illegally download music.

Wal-Mart is evil anyway, they dont care about anything.

applebum
Sep 29, 2008, 11:00 AM
(Anyone know whether Yahoo! is keeping their DRM servers up after closing their service?)


They are not. I have received several e-mails reminding me that they will no longer be able to validate after Sep. 30th and reminding me to burn my music to CD so I can continue to use it. I tried their rental program for a year, but anything I liked I bought through iTunes anyway. So this doesn't affect me. Think about all those who were renting this whole time and had "all the music they ever wanted" in their library....all gone now. How good does renting look to them?

nagromme
Sep 29, 2008, 11:10 AM
It's not amazing to me that big companies would do something like this--and it's even possible (pure speculation) that Microsoft may have a hand in it, if they stop supporting the back-end WMA DRM software that they convinced Yahoo!/Wal-Mart/others to use.

What DOES amaze me is how little notice they've been giving. Months! Even 5 years would be outrageous, but mere months? It's hard to believe.

Bob Knob
Sep 29, 2008, 11:39 AM
(snip)
I'd love to see the big labels allow Apple to switch over completely to DRM-free iTunes Plus. But I'd expect Apple to keep their authorization system turned on for past customers for many years to come.

I seem to remember Jobs once saying something along the lines of killing drm if the labels said they could... I got the impression that rather than needing to leaving authentication servers running, Apple would somehow strip the drm out of your purchases.

Kilamite
Sep 29, 2008, 11:42 AM
Burn to a CD, and import again.

No big deal...unless you have a large library. But I'm sure you'll be able to get some cheap CD-R's down at Walmart ;)

PowerFullMac
Sep 29, 2008, 11:43 AM
Burn to a CD, and import again.

No big deal...unless you have a large library. But I'm sure you'll be able to get some cheap CD-R's down at Walmart ;)

Reduces the quality, though.

Kilamite
Sep 29, 2008, 11:57 AM
Reduces the quality, though.

What bitrate is Walmart's mp3's? Its been so long since I've burned a CD in iTunes. How will the quality be reduced? Can't iTunes burn CD's at 320kbps? Or are the Walmart mp3's lossless?

PowerFullMac
Sep 29, 2008, 12:01 PM
What bitrate is Walmart's mp3's? Its been so long since I've burned a CD in iTunes. How will the quality be reduced? Can't iTunes burn CD's at 320kbps? Or are the Walmart mp3's lossless?

Not sure, never downloaded Wal-Mart music, but generally burning stuff to CDs then ripping them reduces the quality.

mainstreetmark
Sep 29, 2008, 12:06 PM
If iTunes manages to go DRM-free, which we all fully support, I'd like iTMS to simply "remove" my DRM from the iTunes-purchased tracks. Since Apple has the inside key to their DRM, it seems like it could be possible. If not, have it automatically download and replace my files with non-DRM files.

I don't really want to mess with it manually.

kyrow123
Sep 29, 2008, 12:12 PM
I don't think protecting your material is a bad thing, however I do think making the consumer pay for it in the end is not the way to go about it. All the lawsuits pending between the Copyright holders suing the consumer, and eventually the consumer turning around and suing them right back. The only people who win in this situation are the lawyers laying back and raking in the millions. Is there no middle ground?

nagromme
Sep 29, 2008, 12:23 PM
I seem to remember Jobs once saying something along the lines of killing drm if the labels said they could... I got the impression that rather than needing to leaving authentication servers running, Apple would somehow strip the drm out of your purchases.

Software could certainly be written do that. It would be great if Apple did so!

Reduces the quality, though.

Re-ripping doesn't have to reduce quality. You have the choice between quality and using up storage space. Rip to Apple Lossless, WAV, AIF, etc. and you have no loss from the process. Buy you've chosen to pay an alternate price, which is loss of storage space! There's always a price.

And either way, you also pay a large price in TIME and effort, plus the price in money and material waste (needless CDs).

That's why I'm in no hurry to re-rip. Someday, solutions may emerge to allow re-ripping without a physical disc and all the work. And storage won't be so tight.

"Just re-rip" does not negate the bad situation. That is very far from user-friendliness and good customer service.

PowerFullMac
Sep 29, 2008, 12:26 PM
That is very far from user-friendliness and good customer service.

That's Wal-Mart! :p

mkrishnan
Sep 29, 2008, 12:28 PM
Reduces the quality, though.

I don't think it'll be a big issue to the majority of their customers. However, they really should just bite the PR bullet and make arrangements to provide DRM-free versions of the same song files to affected customers. I'm honestly guessing that the number of tracks they sold while they were DRM is not really prohibitive of this.

Ell2Cool
Sep 29, 2008, 12:30 PM
"Walmart: all your music are belong to us"

Who strung the sentence together, a five year old?



dat be well gud english man!

Tallest Skil
Sep 29, 2008, 12:31 PM
"Walmart: all your music are belong to us"

Who strung the sentence together, a five year old?

Fail. Google Zero Wing.

Kilamite
Sep 29, 2008, 12:34 PM
"Walmart: all your music are belong to us"

Who strung the sentence together, a five year old?

Haha, I never even noticed that! Way the brain works I suppose, skimmed through it and didn't even notice the 'are'.

mkrishnan
Sep 29, 2008, 12:45 PM
Who strung the sentence together, a five year old?

Fail. Google Zero Wing.

Hello Gentlemen,

That gave me a really good laugh. :D Thank you both. Clearly somebody set up us the bomb. :)

Ell2Cool
Sep 29, 2008, 01:09 PM
Haha, I never even noticed that! Way the brain works I suppose, skimmed through it and didn't even notice the 'are'.

Its a force of habit.

Thats what happens when everyone at work wants you to proof read their emails! :D

TXCraig
Sep 29, 2008, 01:40 PM
A Class Action Lawsuit for deceptive advertising will emerge from this. The smaller the group, the more cash each one shall receive. .

Yea, the lawers will get paid and the consumer will get a $10.00 WalMart gift card for every 100.00 worth of music they purchased....

whooleytoo
Sep 29, 2008, 01:50 PM
Re-ripping doesn't have to reduce quality. You have the choice between quality and using up storage space. Rip to Apple Lossless, WAV, AIF, etc. and you have no loss from the process. Buy you've chosen to pay an alternate price, which is loss of storage space! There's always a price.

And either way, you also pay a large price in TIME and effort, plus the price in money and material waste (needless CDs).

That's why I'm in no hurry to re-rip. Someday, solutions may emerge to allow re-ripping without a physical disc and all the work. And storage won't be so tight.

Good points.

Likely too that re-ripping as lossless would decrease battery life when on a mobile music player.

I went through that process recently for a few hundred of my tracks, and it was a painfully tedious process. DoubleTwist does a fair job of removing DRM from tracks you own, but has an awful interface and is awkward to use.

mainstreetmark
Sep 29, 2008, 04:18 PM
"Walmart: all your music are belong to us"

Who strung the sentence together, a five year old?



dat be well gud english man!

YOU ARE ON THE WAY TO DESTRUCTION!

Yeah, this is (was?) a very, very well known internet meme about 5 or so years ago. Based on the engrish in some japanese video game. Then, they started to photoshop that bad sentence into weird spots. Then, someone made a video.. I must find. Please wait...

Behold, perhaps two or three times:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qItugh-fFgg

Well, of course:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/All_your_base_are_belong_to_us

Kilamite
Sep 29, 2008, 04:33 PM
Behold, perhaps two or three times:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qItugh-fFgg

Haha.

DMann
Sep 29, 2008, 08:50 PM
YOU ARE ON THE WAY TO DESTRUCTION!

Yeah, this is (was?) a very, very well known internet meme about 5 or so years ago. Based on the engrish in some japanese video game. Then, they started to photoshop that bad sentence into weird spots. Then, someone made a video.. I must find. Please wait...

Behold, perhaps two or three times:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qItugh-fFgg

Well, of course:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/All_your_base_are_belong_to_us

Bad CRC rules! There were nearly as many Blue Screens of Death and general Windows crashes featured in that mix as one would encounter during a day's work. Right up there with the Ballmer "Developers Remix."

applebum
Sep 29, 2008, 09:18 PM
YOU ARE ON THE WAY TO DESTRUCTION!

Yeah, this is (was?) a very, very well known internet meme about 5 or so years ago. Based on the engrish in some japanese video game. Then, they started to photoshop that bad sentence into weird spots. Then, someone made a video.. I must find. Please wait...

Behold, perhaps two or three times:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qItugh-fFgg

Well, of course:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/All_your_base_are_belong_to_us

Now known as lol catz speak!

Nermal
Sep 29, 2008, 09:40 PM
I'd love to see the big labels allow Apple to switch over completely to DRM-free iTunes Plus.

It might not be too far off (http://www.nzherald.co.nz/technology/news/article.cfm?c_id=5&objectid=10534929).