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MacRumors
Feb 9, 2004, 11:30 PM
SFGate.com reports (http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/chronicle/a/2004/02/08/BUGMD4QVJT1.DTL) on Steve Jobs' unique position in between both technology and entertainment industries.

By being both CEO of Pixar and Apple, Steve Jobs holds "has more credibility in Hollywood than anyone else (in Silicon Valley)" according to Paul Saffo, directory of the Institute for the Future in Palo Alto.

An IDC analyst, however, cautions that Jobs "might be surprised to find that Hollywood closes it ranks to rebels".

AndrewMT
Feb 9, 2004, 11:43 PM
Yeah, like Disney rules Hollywood.

MacFan26
Feb 9, 2004, 11:49 PM
Hollywood closes its ranks to rebels? What exactly does that mean? So many people in Hollywood are classified as "rebels."

pinto32
Feb 9, 2004, 11:54 PM
Hollywood has the reputation that it has because of a history of "rebels" that have come in and managed to create change...to "leave a dent in the universe"....I simply see Steve as the leader of the next generation of artists that will change Hollywood and point it towards the 21st century.

Beowulf
Feb 10, 2004, 12:07 AM
The reason that the analyist thinks that about Jobs' is simple. As the old saying goes, "If it ain't broke don't fix it". The people with the power in Hollywood like to keep things the way they are as long as they're making money. The same is true with the auto industry. Why do you think we're still driving fuel-injected cars?

simX
Feb 10, 2004, 12:19 AM
I love how the meaning of the word "rebel" in this instance is to mean "the CEO of a computer animation company who has consistently produced blockbusters with all of its films, including the most recent one which finally surpassed lame-ass lion king in box office and DVD sales", and somehow implies that being a "rebel" is something that Hollywood will turn down.

MacFan26
Feb 10, 2004, 12:38 AM
Originally posted by simX
I love how the meaning of the word "rebel" in this instance is to mean "the CEO of a computer animation company who has consistently produced blockbusters with all of its films, including the most recent one which finally surpassed lame-ass lion king in box office and DVD sales", and somehow implies that being a "rebel" is something that Hollywood will turn down.

Very nicely put :D

Cecret
Feb 10, 2004, 12:44 AM
Hollywood and rebels, or perfectionists/idealists.

Look at the classic example of Orson Wells:

He had an exceptional utopian vision for both films and Hollywood. He believed that close attintion to artistic detail and ultra-high standards would prove their intrinsic value in time. Do you see the similarties to Jobs?

The hard part, as it is for any artist, how do you get reconized as a talent in the near term with a long term vision?

gwangung
Feb 10, 2004, 01:12 AM
Originally posted by Cecret
Hollywood and rebels, or perfectionists/idealists.

Look at the classic example of Orson Wells:

He had an exceptional utopian vision for both films and Hollywood. He believed that close attintion to artistic detail and ultra-high standards would prove their intrinsic value in time. Do you see the similarties to Jobs?

The hard part, as it is for any artist, how do you get reconized as a talent in the near term with a long term vision?

Jobs is not an artist. Jobs is a businessman. It's simply a matter of the Golden Rule---he who hath the gold, makes the rules.

You'll need to go up the power structure a bit before you find parallels to Jobs....

Cecret
Feb 10, 2004, 01:19 AM
read the post.

Jobs is not an artist; but a perfectionist/idealist, like Orson Wells. And this post was about Hollywood vs Rebels.

IndyGopher
Feb 10, 2004, 02:05 AM
Originally posted by gwangung
Jobs is not an artist. Jobs is a businessman. It's simply a matter of the Golden Rule---he who hath the gold, makes the rules.

You'll need to go up the power structure a bit before you find parallels to Jobs....
I think there is some artistry involved in his public speaking... in any good public speaking. Find a bad speaker and you'll see the difference pretty quickly.

virividox
Feb 10, 2004, 03:59 AM
hey lion king was cool :)

i think traditional hollywood types are just threatened by jobs because he represents the new age of film making at least animation wise. people fear what they cant understand, and try to repress it. but sooner of later it will be mainstream. that being said i dont want to see traditional animation to go away, i quite enjoyed those films, call it sentimentality but i grew up in the hey day of disney films and would be sad to see them be all replaced by cgi.

kangaroo
Feb 10, 2004, 06:53 AM
Originally posted by Cecret
Hollywood and rebels, or perfectionists/idealists.

Look at the classic example of Orson Wells:

He had an exceptional utopian vision for both films and Hollywood. He believed that close attintion to artistic detail and ultra-high standards would prove their intrinsic value in time. Do you see the similarties to Jobs?

The hard part, as it is for any artist, how do you get reconized as a talent in the near term with a long term vision?

Let's hope the similarities end there--it was Welles who said:

"I began at the top and have been making my way down ever since."

MorganX
Feb 10, 2004, 07:39 AM
Originally posted by MacFan26
Hollywood closes its ranks to rebels? What exactly does that mean? So many people in Hollywood are classified as "rebels."

That means because Cold Mountain was filmed in Europe, it didn't get nominated for Best Picture or Director. At least that's what the actors and director think. They're probably right.

MorganX
Feb 10, 2004, 07:44 AM
Originally posted by gwangung
Jobs is not an artist. Jobs is a businessman. It's simply a matter of the Golden Rule---he who hath the gold, makes the rules.


This is true as long as you stay within the boundaries of "your" kingdom.

Step into another King's realm, or worse, into Barbarian land, and you'll find out just how much better it is to stay home, where you're King.

I don't think too much about the Pixar Disney thing, that's their business and business can be shrewd. But I will say, Jobs' public ridicule was not professional at the level he's at.

If he keeps that up he's going to learn some hard lessons from people with more power than he has. Hollywood takes care of each other, that's why they've lasted this long through war and political scandal.

You can't sell snake oil to another snake oil salesman.

ccuilla
Feb 10, 2004, 08:26 AM
In 2001, worldwide gross revenues generated by motion pictures in all territories and media (including music and ancillaries) amounted to over $40 billion.

Apple's trailing 12 month revenue is almost $7 billion. ONE company. The SMALLEST player in the computer industry.

Just an interesting couple of facts.

Jerry Spoon
Feb 10, 2004, 09:33 AM
Originally posted by pinto32
....I simply see Steve as the leader of the next generation of artists that will change Hollywood and point it towards the 21st century.

Steve Jobs playing the role of "artist" as defined in Hollywood terms. I don't really see that. Visionary maybe. Artist... no.

South of Heaven
Feb 10, 2004, 10:02 AM
Originally posted by MorganX
That means because Cold Mountain was filmed in Europe, it didn't get nominated for Best Picture or Director. At least that's what the actors and director think. They're probably right.

Then they would have to explain why Return of the King was nominated for both Best Director and Best Film. It was filmed in NZ.

As for Jobs and being a rebel in Hollywood, the entertainment and business news is on this story because of the Disney and Pixar falling out. It will soon turn to some other news story and Pixar will go back and make movies.

mrsebastian
Feb 10, 2004, 11:19 AM
from the article: Last week, Jobs went so far as to declare that Pixar had surpassed Disney as "the most powerful and trusted brand in animation.''

uh, yeah! like i mentioned in another thread, disney used to innovate and create once upon a time, but not anymore. all of "disney's" animated releases of late have been pixar, well the successful ones anyway. i think it was a brilliant strategy to dump disney. with that kind of creative power and with the salesman of the century, pixar can get amazing deals for distribution of their films.

agreenster
Feb 10, 2004, 11:20 AM
Originally posted by MorganX
That means because Cold Mountain was filmed in Europe, it didn't get nominated for Best Picture or Director. At least that's what the actors and director think. They're probably right.

Huh? Thats BS. Cold Mountain was just simply overrated.

And why was Return of the King nominated for umpteen Oscars? 90% of the cast and crew weren't American. New Zealand ruled the school in Middle Earth.

agreenster
Feb 10, 2004, 11:27 AM
Originally posted by MorganX
That means because Cold Mountain was filmed in Europe, it didn't get nominated for Best Picture or Director. At least that's what the actors and director think. They're probably right.

Huh? Thats BS. Cold Mountain was just simply overrated.

And why was Return of the King nominated for umpteen Oscars? 90% of the cast and crew weren't American. New Zealand ruled the school in Middle Earth.

MorganX
Feb 10, 2004, 01:27 PM
Originally posted by agreenster
Huh? Thats BS. Cold Mountain was just simply overrated.

And why was Return of the King nominated for umpteen Oscars? 90% of the cast and crew weren't American. New Zealand ruled the school in Middle Earth.

I don't know. I'm just relaying here. It's from one of the chairmen of Miramax. Could just be sour grapes.

MacFan26
Feb 10, 2004, 01:39 PM
As far as the Oscars go, I think Bill Murray was overrated in Lost in Translation. Haven't seen Cold Mountain yet, but I have the book.