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j763
Jun 14, 2002, 04:39 AM
Originally posted by polymerase on the MacCentral.com forums
I have nothing against Jello shots but would you name your kid that?

Would you name your child polymerase?



Pismo
Jun 14, 2002, 06:34 AM
I have two cousins named Princess and Precious. Polymerase doesn't sound that bad. Polymerase doesn't sound like a porn name such as Princess and Precious.

Macmaniac
Jun 14, 2002, 06:40 AM
Some names are ment to stay as scientific names.

polymerase
Jun 14, 2002, 06:57 AM
No, but I was going to name my dog exonuclease but then I was going to name her Clarus but ended up with Maddie.

http://mbcf.dfci.harvard.edu/stuff/1.jpg

mc68k
Jun 14, 2002, 12:49 PM
Rock on. I'm probably one of the few here that actually knows what polymerase means. I guess those BIO classes had some use after all.

Polymerase sounds better than ligase, at least.

MacAztec
Jun 14, 2002, 01:07 PM
I think I will be naming my kid Robert

Mr. Anderson
Jun 14, 2002, 01:25 PM
I knew a girl who's father was a Nasa Engineer and named her Digitte

Durandal7
Jun 30, 2002, 08:31 PM
I don't know about polymerase. How about Enterokinase?

firewire2001
Jun 30, 2002, 11:13 PM
Originally posted by mc68k
Rock on. I'm probably one of the few here that actually knows what polymerase means. I guess those BIO classes had some use after all.

Polymerase sounds better than ligase, at least.

haha.. i havent had bio classes yet.. what does Polymerase mean?

mc68k
Jul 1, 2002, 01:10 AM
Originally posted by firewire2001


haha.. i havent had bio classes yet.. what does Polymerase mean?
After many college classes and labs of Bio (even though my major is CS) I can finally unleash my knowledge that I once thought was completely useless…yay!

Well, DNA and RNA are partly made up of base pairs which are the "code" for making proteins. The sequence basically goes as follows:

DNA->RNA->Protein

Through this process there are many enymes (specialized proteins) that catalyze the reading of the base pairs.

There are several diffeent kinds of polymerases— the ones they taught me were DNA and RNA polymerase.

DNA polymerase is one of the proteins that duplicates DNA. Its job is to match opposing base pairs with each other (for example Guanine with Adenine). Every ump-teenth time DNA polymerase screws up with the matching, so their are other enymes that check it's work so that mutations in the DNA are kept to a minimum.

RNA polymerase is one of the proteins that is responsible in transcribing the DNA base-pairs that code for protein, also known as genes, or exons. It does the same thing as DNA polymerase but makes a RNA template from which ribosome organelles make polypeptide chains of amino acids, also known as proteins (which we are folding right now). The only difference is that instead of duplicating DNA into other DNA, it is decoding the DNA into RNA.

So in summary, Polymerase matches base pairs with opposing nucleotides. I'm sure something is not entirely accurate here, but this is the general idea.

Rower_CPU
Jul 1, 2002, 01:40 AM
Nerd...:rolleyes: :p ;)

You've made me proud.:D

DannyZR2
Jul 1, 2002, 01:46 AM
Originally posted by mc68k

After many college classes and labs of Bio ...


Every ump-teenth time DNA polymerase screws up with the matching, so their are other enzymes that check it's work so that mutations in the DNA are kept to a minimum.


Isn't God SMART??? Man I tell ya!!! He got this all down the FIRST time too! - amazing

Geert
Jul 1, 2002, 04:22 AM
at least polymerase is better than deoxiribonucleic acid
It's easier :p

backspinner
Jul 1, 2002, 04:17 PM
Originally posted by mc68k
So in summary, Polymerase matches base pairs with opposing nucleotides. I'm sure something is not entirely accurate here, but this is the general idea.
Well said and quite accurate!

SoarEyes
Jul 1, 2002, 04:36 PM
how about ”gastro”
you know Gastritus in full.

I still think the rest of the world is crazy
- George Bush -