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View Full Version : Gas Prices Set Record


MacFan25
Mar 23, 2004, 04:19 PM
CNN Article (http://money.cnn.com/2004/03/23/news/economy/gas_aaa/index.htm?cnn=yes)

NEW YORK (CNNfn) - The average price of gasoline at the pump has hit a record high of $1.738 a regular self-serve gallon, according to the Automobile Association of America.

This sure isn't good news, and I'm sure the prices will continue to go up until summer.

Flowbee
Mar 23, 2004, 05:10 PM
I *wish* I could buy gas for $1.74 per gallon around here. It's $2.12 at the station up the street.

miloblithe
Mar 23, 2004, 05:19 PM
And yet, demand for SUVs isn't going down. Ugh.

MatMistake
Mar 23, 2004, 05:57 PM
thats nothing, in the uk petrol (as we like to call it :p) is around 80 pence a litre ($1.50 roughly) or around 3.60 ($6.70) a gallon

though I have a feeling that a gallon in the UK is diffent from in the US...
(and I got my figures off the 'net, I don't drive so I'm not really up to speed on this. seems about right though)

but the point is, fule in the US is very cheep

King Cobra
Mar 23, 2004, 06:05 PM
That $1.738 is almost about what's going on around in Portland ME and NW of there.

Click Me! (http://www.chicagogasprices.com/)

wdlove
Mar 23, 2004, 07:28 PM
We are paying $1.739 here in Boston, self serve regular.

vwcruisn
Mar 23, 2004, 07:37 PM
We are paying $1.739 here in Boston, self serve regular.


sheesh you are all lucky. I am paying about 2.40 a gallon here in santa monica ca. My car requires premium gas, but still.. 2.40 kills this commuting college student

Dr. Zauis
Mar 23, 2004, 07:39 PM
Gas is $1.63 for 89 Octane here in St. Louis MO

SiliconAddict
Mar 23, 2004, 08:39 PM
*fingers crossed* One more year. I just have to hold out one more year before I get my Prius then I can flip the oil companies the bird.

big
Mar 23, 2004, 09:26 PM
$1.57 in Alabama, $1.49 some pumps, dont expect prices to ever go down, the '70s was a test. Based on the Paris oil summit of 2000, basically all studies have showed we have already hit our production peak. Why are we going into the tar pits of Canada? They said it would be too costly, why are we mining in Alaska? Why are we in Iraq?

KC9AIC
Mar 23, 2004, 10:12 PM
America's prices are still cheap! In Japan, we pay just under a dollar per liter, making it about $3.75 per gallon! And that's without price surges.

chewbaccapits
Mar 23, 2004, 10:30 PM
*fingers crossed* One more year. I just have to hold out one more year before I get my Prius then I can flip the oil companies the bird.

Dude..I flip them off every morning as I pass the mobile refinery in my nice black prius....Placed 350 miles before I refueled for the first time....
:)

MrMacMan
Mar 23, 2004, 11:11 PM
Its hurting here in NYC...


They are high... way to high.

:(

big
Mar 23, 2004, 11:29 PM
> America's prices are still cheap

ummm, because the government under writes our costs... because America has screwed up by designing communities that have based our whole economy on the ability to drive anything and everyone anywhere... (plus the promise to pay off debt and a housing boom, those three items is what drives America today)

crazytom
Mar 24, 2004, 12:23 AM
I love my 1991 Geo Metro. It still get 50 mpg highway! :D :D :D

Unfortunately, if it ever goes kaput, there's no comparable replacement on the US market (I only paid $7k for it brand new).

AngryLawnGnome
Mar 24, 2004, 01:06 AM
My car uses a ton of gas and it doesn't bother me at all. Maybe because I don't care about the future.

voicegy
Mar 24, 2004, 01:15 AM
San Diego has the highest gas prices in the nation, according to the Lundberg report.

voicegy
Mar 24, 2004, 01:16 AM
OK, OK...that was a bit of an exaggeration...this is the real thing. (y'all jealous of my home town now?)

vwcruisn
Mar 24, 2004, 01:33 AM
OK, OK...that was a bit of an exaggeration...this is the real thing. (y'all jealous of my home town now?)


grrr why are the prices here in california so much higher... how can one state be selling gas for a full dollar cheaper PER GALLON than here?

i can be happy my car gets about 30 miles to a gallon on average. i go around 300 miles before i need to throw in another 10 gallons

Savage Henry
Mar 24, 2004, 03:01 AM
My last receipt works out at $6.55 per gallon. (0.78 per litre)

That's in the UK, one of the highest taxed fuels in the entire galaxy.

So do not trouble me with this pocket calculator stuff of a couple of bucks a gallon!!

JFreak
Mar 24, 2004, 03:13 AM
$6.55 per gallon. (0.78 per litre)

about the same in finland - 1.15 euros per litre, 95 octane standard.

takao
Mar 24, 2004, 03:41 AM
about 1 euro per liter in austria
that sums up to ca. 4,5 $ per gallon

but they prices wer already higher a year ago i guess 1,2 euro last year per liter

PalmHarborTchr
Mar 24, 2004, 09:02 AM
San Diego has the highest gas prices in the nation, according to the Lundberg report.

Hey, Roger has it all under control in San
Diego...of course its Bill Clinton's fault.
Simple huh? When it goes to $3.00 a gallon
then will it be the Chaney Energy Policy
he established behind closed doors in January of 2003?? Remember readers,
most of the cost of gasoline in Europe
is tax...diesel fuel is about half the cost. Thats why many cars in Europe from Mercedes to Ford run on diesel.

Roger1
Mar 24, 2004, 11:25 AM
Who has what under control??? :p

Gas where I live is between 1.65-1.80 a gallon, depending on where you go. I am still considering getting a more fuel efficient car. I currently get about 20 m.p.g., but I'm tired of giving a good chunk of my money to the gas companies.

big
Mar 24, 2004, 11:39 AM
Yeah, everyone complains about EU's gas prices, but what is your commute? Here in the States, you have to figure the average is 30-40 mins to work, one way. then to the store, add another 10-15 mins, then to a gas station, another 10 mins. We spend a lot of time in our cars, and no one has health insurance provided for by the Government.

SiliconAddict
Mar 24, 2004, 01:00 PM
Yeah, everyone complains about EU's gas prices, but what is your commute? Here in the States, you have to figure the average is 30-40 mins to work, one way. then to the store, add another 10-15 mins, then to a gas station, another 10 mins. We spend a lot of time in our cars, and no one has health insurance provided for by the Government.

http://www.pocketpcthoughts.com/forums/images/smiles/boohoo.gif

Ummm keep in mind that there is a lot of people that don't have cars at all and simply bike to work or take the public transit system.

And the 30-40 minute commute may be real but that simply from poorly designed cities. *shrugs*

I don't think you are going to find a whole heck of a lot of sympathy on this thread. There are alternatives to driving a car back and forth if one looks hard enough.

jsw
Mar 24, 2004, 01:47 PM
http://www.pocketpcthoughts.com/forums/images/smiles/boohoo.gif

Ummm keep in mind that there is a lot of people that don't have cars at all and simply bike to work or take the public transit system.

And the 30-40 minute commute may be real but that simply from poorly designed cities. *shrugs*

I don't think you are going to find a whole heck of a lot of sympathy on this thread. There are alternatives to driving a car back and forth if one looks hard enough.

I don't think you can blame city designs. Most of them were substantially complete prior to the introduction, or at least the popular acceptance, of the automobile.

Second, people here, voluntarily or involuntarily, change jobs more often than they change homes - on the average. They cannot mandate where the office/factory will be, nor do they typically have a local choice. So, even if they are lucky enough to be able to move close to their original job, they cannot guarantee being close to their next one - and it is non-trivial and often financially impossible for many of these people to move.

Most Americans have cars or access to their family's cars. The only places where that's not the case are in the major cities, and, even there, most people have cars. There's actually a pretty small minority of people in most areas who bike to work or take public transportation - again, outside of major metropolitan areas. And, even those people who work in large cites and commute there via public transportation often live in suburbs and drive when they're not at work.

If you live 20 miles from work - or much less than that in areas with winter weather - and if the public transportation system doesn't go by your home (typical for vast majority, area-wise, of the States) then you drive, and you have no other option except to find a new job or find a new home, and most people can't really do those options.

Savage Henry
Mar 24, 2004, 02:59 PM
I don't think you can blame city designs. Most of them were substantially complete prior to the introduction, or at least the popular acceptance, of the automobile.

Second, people here, voluntarily or involuntarily, change jobs more often than they change homes - on the average. They cannot mandate where the office/factory will be, nor do they typically have a local choice. So, even if they are lucky enough to be able to move close to their original job, they cannot guarantee being close to their next one - and it is non-trivial and often financially impossible for many of these people to move.

Most Americans have cars or access to their family's cars. The only places where that's not the case are in the major cities, and, even there, most people have cars. There's actually a pretty small minority of people in most areas who bike to work or take public transportation - again, outside of major metropolitan areas. And, even those people who work in large cites and commute there via public transportation often live in suburbs and drive when they're not at work.

If you live 20 miles from work - or much less than that in areas with winter weather - and if the public transportation system doesn't go by your home (typical for vast majority, area-wise, of the States) then you drive, and you have no other option except to find a new job or find a new home, and most people can't really do those options.


US = $1.70
UK = $6.70

No sympathy here, and I suffer from the same location/commute conditions above. So why am I paying 5 bucks more again?

takao
Mar 24, 2004, 03:47 PM
I don't think you can blame city designs. Most of them were substantially complete prior to the introduction, or at least the popular acceptance, of the automobile.

i agree on the rest of your post but i don't think this holds true.
rome/paris had traffic problems 2000 years ago (when obviously no cars existed)
america was the first country where popular acceptance of the automobile was created
i guess it really depends on the infrastructure/attitude towards public transportations

Sweetfeld28
Mar 24, 2004, 05:51 PM
Here in NW Ohio its $1.83/gallon. it a good thing that a friend gave me a heads up on the price jump. I filled up two hours before they changed the prices at the BP station near me, i filled my car when prices were at $1.63/gallon.

jsw
Mar 24, 2004, 06:55 PM
i agree on the rest of your post but i don't think this holds true.
rome/paris had traffic problems 2000 years ago (when obviously no cars existed)
america was the first country where popular acceptance of the automobile was created
i guess it really depends on the infrastructure/attitude towards public transportations

Good point. I blame a lot of the traffic issues here on poor suburb planning. They almost all were developed (or massively enlarged) post-auto, and instead of planning on centralizing common places (grocery stores, post offices, etc.) they ended up building many square miles of homes with no easy access to places without a car - they were actually built so that you needed a car. No good public transportation plans, etc.

Again, good point.

jsw
Mar 24, 2004, 06:57 PM
US = $1.70
UK = $6.70

No sympathy here, and I suffer from the same location/commute conditions above. So why am I paying 5 bucks more again?

Access to better beer?
Quick access to the rest of Europe?

I don't know. Move here. Much cheaper gas. But... guns, flat American accents, self-centered & self-righteous general population... maybe it's not so bad that you pay more for gas. There are other benefits of living where you do. Not the food, in particular, but other things. :)

Backtothemac
Mar 24, 2004, 09:30 PM
Sweet Jesus! 6.70 a gallon! How much of that is tax? Here in Alabama it is about $1.59 right now, and .37 cent per gallon is tax.

I think it would be time to overthrow the government if gas was that much. Wow, unreal. Prius, where are you now?

applemacdude
Mar 24, 2004, 09:39 PM
The highest Ive seen here in the Bay Area is $2.39..

Yeah If I had a car i would be worried....but i dont so

big
Mar 24, 2004, 10:43 PM
>Ummm keep in mind that there is a lot of people that don't have cars at all and simply bike to work or take the public transit system.

Luck bastards, you can not do that in H'ville

>I think it would be time to overthrow the government if gas was that much. Wow, unreal. Prius, where are you now?

Yeah, we're lucky here price wise... but it's comin', what do you think happened with all that tea?

whocares
Mar 24, 2004, 11:04 PM
thats nothing, in the uk petrol (as we like to call it :p) is around 80 pence a litre ($1.50 roughly) or around 3.60 ($6.70) a gallon

though I have a feeling that a gallon in the UK is diffent from in the US...
(and I got my figures off the 'net, I don't drive so I'm not really up to speed on this. seems about right though)


1 UK Gal = 4.5 litre
1 US Gal = 3.8 liter
(go figure why they're different, kinda like litre/liter :p )

So that's more like $5.70/Gal. Still pretty darn expensive! :eek: :eek:

-Backtothemac
I can't speak for the UK, but here in France about 90% of the price is tax. There an interior tax on petroleum products (TIPP) and we pay VAT (purchase tax) on gas + TIPP. So in effect we are paying taxes on tax :( :mad: :rolleyes: :rolleyes:

But we get good wine...

voicegy
Mar 27, 2004, 02:19 PM
A disturbing and tacky trend:

"With record-high gas prices, more people are speeding away from the pump without paying for fill-ups that can cost as much as $40 a tank."

I'm sorry, I don't care how desperate things might be... I would NEVER fill up my car and take off without paying...geesh, this is so tasteless.:mad:

http://news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/ap/20040327/ap_on_bi_ge/gas_prices_thefts_2

wdlove
Mar 27, 2004, 03:11 PM
http://www.pocketpcthoughts.com/forums/images/smiles/boohoo.gif

Ummm keep in mind that there is a lot of people that don't have cars at all and simply bike to work or take the public transit system.

I don't think you are going to find a whole heck of a lot of sympathy on this thread. There are alternatives to driving a car back and forth if one looks hard enough.

My wife is a visiting nurse and so is dependent on her car. It's her office and has to go the patients homes. Because of Boston traffic she spends a lot of time on the road. She is usually lucky and purchases her gas on either Sunday or Wednesday. At a local Shell you get six cents off if you purchase then, that saves some.

It is just human nature that on things of money sympathy usually doesn't follow.

slowtreme
Mar 27, 2004, 06:49 PM
WHen I moved from San Diego in '89 to the east coast I went from 1.50 to under a dollar a gallon. I thought that was great... but it sucks to not be in SD.

I moved back after a couple years and never really noticed as the gas prices went up. Since them I have moved to Florida, and while Gas is about 35% cheaper. It still sucks to not live in Cali, but I go where my work is. I just drive a car that gets 30mpg. :)

vwcruisn
Mar 27, 2004, 07:04 PM
A disturbing and tacky trend:

"With record-high gas prices, more people are speeding away from the pump without paying for fill-ups that can cost as much as $40 a tank."

I'm sorry, I don't care how desperate things might be... I would NEVER fill up my car and take off without paying...geesh, this is so tasteless.:mad:

http://news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/ap/20040327/ap_on_bi_ge/gas_prices_thefts_2

what? how is that possible? the pumps dont even turn on until you pay the atendant or swipe your credit card :confused: Are you talking about full service? When i get full service around here they ask me how much gas i want and i pay after they pump. Do they just peel out when the guy finishes pumping?

Freakk123
Mar 27, 2004, 07:28 PM
Its hurting here in NYC...


They are high... way to high.

:(

Yeah, what are they asking, like $1.999? Its ridiculous. Oy vay. My dad has a Chevy Suburban that gets about 30 Gallons a tank (I believe the biggest tank in production), so to fill it up it costs sometimes upwards of $60, depending on which gas station its purchased at.

Opteron
Mar 27, 2004, 07:30 PM
:( poor old you, 51 australian cents per litre.

we pay between 85-100cents per litre in Australia.

db2guru
Mar 27, 2004, 09:17 PM
... and no one has health insurance provided for by the Government.

And as should be obvious from all these posts of the price difference between the US and EU, no one there has health insurance provided by the government, either. It is provided by their neighbors, partially through outrageous fuel taxes, partially through outrageous income taxes and through innumerable other VAT, import, and ad infinitum taxes.

People here squall about wanting "government provided healthcare" all the time. The government here will provide your healthcare the same way the governments there do: higher fuel taxes, higher income taxes, higher property taxes, and most likely some new taxes they have not yet thought of.

So, your "government provided healthcare" will be provided by the same fine folks who provide all of your other government services: you and your neighbors. Of course, they will have to skim a few percent off the top to cover the administrative expenses, but hey, its worth to have the government paying.... LOL

And after this conversion is in place we can have the same "wait in line for up to 6 months" health care system here in the US that is so endearing to those unfortunate souls living with that system in other countries where "health care is provided by the government".

I'm not out to offend anyone. Just remember there is no "government funded" anything in this world.

iMeowbot
Mar 27, 2004, 09:45 PM
what? how is that possible? the pumps dont even turn on until you pay the atendant or swipe your credit card :confused:

Regional thang. In Massachusetts it's pretty common to have pump-then-pay self service islands, at least in low crime areas. At one station I frequent, the pumps closest to the building work that way, but the ones closer to the street that they can't see as well from the window are pay first.