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View Full Version : I Wonder How Many People Bond Accidentally Shot -- PPK Recalled


Sun Baked
Feb 25, 2009, 05:09 PM
Smith & Wesson recalls guns that could misfire (http://www.forbes.com/feeds/ap/2009/02/24/ap6091197.html)

Smith & Wesson Corp. is recalling certain pistols that could fire without the trigger being pulled.

The gun maker said it was recalling all Walther PPK and PPK/S pistols that it manufactured from March 21, 2002, until Feb. 3, 2009.

Smith & Wesson posted a recall notice Friday on its Web site and offered additional details in a Securities and Exchange Commission filing Tuesday.

The filing cited a problem in the affected pistol models that "may permit a round to be discharged without the trigger being pulled."

Now all they need is for Aston Marton to recall their cars due to them slipping out of gear while in park. :p

ucfgrad93
Feb 25, 2009, 08:06 PM
I had a PPK, but I sold it in 2000. I loved that gun. So easy to carry on a daily basis.

marbles
Feb 25, 2009, 08:08 PM
:eek: Glad I'm in the EU sometimes

Mr. Giver '94
Feb 25, 2009, 08:59 PM
Let's play guns!!!! :eek:

Abstract
Feb 26, 2009, 12:04 AM
^^^We'll just point guns at each other and wait for something to happen. The first one to die......LOSES!!

Lord Blackadder
Feb 28, 2009, 07:08 PM
Walther may have invented the PPK, but a number of other companies have produced under license, Smith & Wesson being one of them. Many firearms aficionados worship at the altar of Smith & Wesson - I'm not one of them. They've been known to produce real junk from time to time...

...James Bond would use a post-WWII German-made PPK anyway, so no worries about an accidental discharge. :)

iJohnHenry
Feb 28, 2009, 07:14 PM
...James Bond would use a post-WWII German-made PPK anyway, so no worries about an accidental discharge. :)

Exactly. Ian Fleming died in '64, so any PPK's would predate that. :p

marbles
Feb 28, 2009, 07:26 PM
I found an old Webley & Scott very pistol the other day , any idea on value American gun people?

Lord Blackadder
Feb 28, 2009, 10:20 PM
I found an old Webley & Scott very pistol the other day , any idea on value American gun people?

Depends...Webley & Scott made a LOT of different firearms over the years. Is it a revolver or semi-auto? The semi-autos are rare and quite valuable. There were several models of revolver and value, depending on the variant and condition, ranges from a couple hundred to several thousand US dollars. The weapons you are most likely to see are one of the various marks of the top break (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Webley_Revolver) type.

I'm currently looking for a Webley Mk. VI (.455 caliber) to add to my collection. It's a weapon James Bond would consider over-large and clumsy, but it was just fine for the people serving in His/Her Majesty's less secret services....

velocityg4
Mar 1, 2009, 02:37 PM
"When the manual safety is disengaged, Smith & Wesson's Product Engineering Group has determined that the possibility exists in certain firearms that lowering the hammer may cause a chambered round to fire."

Though this is a potentially dangerous flaw. A PPK sitting around will not accidentally discharge.

Going by this description. You must have a round in the chamber, safety off, with the hammer cocked pointing at yourself or somebody else. Then while the gun is still pointed at yourself of someone else manually lower the hammer.

Lord Blackadder
Mar 1, 2009, 03:07 PM
Some handguns have a de-cocking lever, but for those of us who do not carry a firearm around, it's safer to drop out the magazine and rack the slide to eject the chambered round. Less risk that way.

marbles
Mar 1, 2009, 04:25 PM
Depends...Webley & Scott made a LOT of different firearms over the years. Is it a revolver or semi-auto? The semi-autos are rare and quite valuable. There were several models of revolver and value, depending on the variant and condition, ranges from a couple hundred to several thousand US dollars. The weapons you are most likely to see are one of the various marks of the top break (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Webley_Revolver) type.

I'm currently looking for a Webley Mk. VI (.455 caliber) to add to my collection. It's a weapon James Bond would consider over-large and clumsy, but it was just fine for the people serving in His/Her Majesty's less secret services....

It's a very pistol, I believe it was used in the Laurence of Arabia film.Looks like this one below , but in better condition :

iJohnHenry
Mar 1, 2009, 04:31 PM
Very pistol is an English expression.

He would know it as a flare gun. :)

Depending on the bore, it might fire a shotgun shell. Good for close-quarter rumbles. ;)

marbles
Mar 1, 2009, 04:45 PM
Very pistol is an English expression.

He would know it as a flare gun. :)

Depending on the bore, it might fire a shotgun shell. Good for close-quarter rumbles. ;)

Thanks John :) . I'll look into that .

iJohnHenry
Mar 1, 2009, 04:52 PM
Thanks John :) . I'll look into that .

I believe it was invented because the bad guys kept shooting the whistle-blower. :p

Lord Blackadder
Mar 1, 2009, 04:54 PM
Very pistol is an English expression.

He would know it as a flare gun. :)

LOL, I wasn't aware of that term, but I recognized it as a flare pistol on sight.

Depending on the bore, it might fire a shotgun shell. Good for close-quarter rumbles. ;)

Almost all flare pistols use a standard shotgun gauge, but they are not strong enough to withstand firing regular shotgun loads. They are for flares only. Chances are you'd destroy the flare pistol, your hand and maybe worse.

There are some modern flare guns designed to handle shotgun ammo in an emergency, but they are made to firearms standards.

Flare pistols are generally less valuable than firearms, but a nice WWII era British flare gun seem to fetch around $100-$200 US. Older or rarer variants can go much higher.

iJohnHenry
Mar 1, 2009, 04:59 PM
I agree on the strength of the charge, hence the "might" in my post.

The one in the picture appears to be made of brass, which would probably fracture after a few firings, if not immediately.

marbles
Mar 1, 2009, 06:02 PM
It is brass and just a lovely looking ornament for me really, I have a couple of muskets etc on the wall to , guess I just like how things like this are made. maybe because my father is/was an engineer and some of his enthusiasm for well made 'things' has rubbed off on me
I will not be trying the shot gun round in it btw :) if I lost my hand I wouldn't be able to harangue folks on here :)


from the wiki:
Webley & Scott produced a number of single-shot, break open signal flare gun devices used by Commonwealth Military Forces during the First and Second World Wars. Perhaps the most prolific of these was the No.1 MkIII, produced in 1918 at the company's Birmingham facility. A variant, differing only in its use of black plastic grip panels instead of the earlier wood, was produced by Colonial Sugar Refinery in Sydney, Australia in 1942. The pistols can often be seen in films, notably Lawrence of Arabia, where the title character discharges one to signal the beginning of an attack on a disabled enemy train.

alphaod
Mar 1, 2009, 06:05 PM
Very pistol is an English expression.

He would know it as a flare gun. :)

Depending on the bore, it might fire a shotgun shell. Good for close-quarter rumbles. ;)

Thanks John. I didn't know that.

DZ/015
Mar 2, 2009, 02:16 AM
Many firearms aficionados worship at the altar of Smith & Wesson - I'm not one of them. They've been known to produce real junk from time to time...

I'm not one of them either. However, I recently acquired an SW9G at a price too good to pass up. It is one of the Sigma series, known for copying the Glock. It has been the most amazing out-of-the-box firearms I have ever owned. Never jammed despite using every type of round I could find. Always accurate also. A welcome addition to the collection.

jzuena
Mar 2, 2009, 08:07 AM
It's a very pistol, I believe it was used in the Laurence of Arabia film.Looks like this one below , but in better condition :

Was the one you have used in the film or just ones like it? If yours was in the film and you have any type of proof, it could be worth thousands (maybe even tens of thousands) of pounds to a movie memorabilia collector. If it just looks like ones from the movie, you might get 25-50 for it, maybe 100 from a collector who needs to fill a hole in their collection. If it still works (are very pistols banned with real guns in the EU?) you might get double that -- it is after all only a flare pistol, even if it is a well crafted one. Nobody bid on a deactivated one that had a very high starting bid of 195 on gundeals.co.uk which, coincidentally, had the exact same picture as your post...

marbles
Mar 2, 2009, 08:16 AM
Was the one you have used in the film or just ones like it? If yours was in the film and you have any type of proof, it could be worth thousands (maybe even tens of thousands) of pounds to a movie memorabilia collector. If it just looks like ones from the movie, you might get 25-50 for it, maybe 100 from a collector who needs to fill a hole in their collection. If it still works (are very pistols banned with real guns in the EU?) you might get double that -- it is after all only a flare pistol, even if it is a well crafted one. Nobody bid on a deactivated one that had a very high starting bid of 195 on gundeals.co.uk which, coincidentally, had the exact same picture as your post...

I was just curious as to the value for contents insurance purposes, I've no idea if it was used in the film tbh but I'm led to believe from family members that a relative was involved with film years ago, so I don't know for sure, no proof anyway(that we've found yet) so.....
I wouldn't sell it regardless, it's an ornament & has sentimental value.
I used that picture from gun deals uk ,to illustrate the gun, twas the first one that came up in google images :o