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wdlove
Mar 30, 2004, 01:42 PM
FDA approves a technique to help aging eyes read better

By Alice Dembner, Globe Staff, 3/30/2004

One more symptom of aging fell to science last week when the federal government approved surgery for the loss of close-up vision that strikes people over 40.

The three-minute procedure, called conductive keratoplasty, or CK, uses radiowaves to reshape one eye and enable it to focus clearly on nearby objects. The Food and Drug Administration found CK safe and reasonably effective, allowing CK to join face lifts, hip replacements and botox shots in the anti-aging arsenal.

But don't throw away the reading glasses yet. The results gradually wear off and doctors expect many patients will need retreatment in three to five years. In addition, most patients will still need glasses when reading long manuscripts or fine print. And for people who are also nearsighted or have longstanding far-sightedness, other surgeries, such as LASIK, that use lasers to cut and reshape the eye, may be more appropriate.http://www.boston.com/news/globe/health_science/articles/2004/03/30/is_the_type_getting_smaller_or_are_you_getting_older/

mvc
Mar 30, 2004, 04:48 PM
Well, Arn must be getting on because he made all the avatars and buttons bigger!

At 41 I am on the edge of this longsightedness change, and I still have no trouble with small type, but I suppose working onscreen all day long might have an impact on that.

Every few months over the last year tho, I have experienced subtle temporary focus problems that my optometrist says is to be expected as the eye's minimum focus depth shifts (one eye at a time for heavans sake!), and the brain takes a few days to recalibrate!

It can make my on-screen time seem a bit trippy on and off.

My minimum focus has moved out about 1-2 inches over the last year, so I guess its on its way.

As they say, why are you having another birthday, aren't you old enough yet? ;)

Roger1
Mar 30, 2004, 04:56 PM
Every few months over the last year tho, I have experienced subtle temporary focus problems that my optometrist says is to be expected as the eye's minimum focus depth shifts (one eye at a time for heavans sake!), and the brain takes a few days to recalibrate!
)

Does this mean you turn your head and squint when reading?? ;)

mvc
Mar 30, 2004, 05:09 PM
No, its more like my head needs to be in two places at once to focus comfortably. It passes after a coupla days, the brain simply adjusts somehow. I only notice it on-screen.

And squinting is over-rated! :cool:

Thomas Veil
Mar 31, 2004, 07:05 AM
Gotta love those targeted ads! The ones on the bottom of this page (when I looked at it) are all for reading glasses and Lasik procedures. :p

I hate bifocals, but I need them. Around 40, my eyes became too weak to focus on the computer screen anymore.

Ah well.

gwuMACaddict
Mar 31, 2004, 09:21 AM
I hate bifocals, but I need them. Around 40, my eyes became too weak to focus on the computer screen anymore.

just get the ones where you can't see the lines where the lenses change. no one'll ever know youre wearing em

wdlove
Mar 31, 2004, 12:43 PM
just get the ones where you can't see the lines where the lenses change. no one'll ever know youre wearing em

I agree the graduated lens is great. My glasses are trifocal. I was reluctant to get them. Had a fear about adjusting, but it works pretty much automatic as advertised. Also the new plastic lenses are a life saver r/t safety and weight.

Thomas Veil
Mar 31, 2004, 09:40 PM
just get the ones where you can't see the lines where the lenses change. no one'll ever know youre wearing em
It's not that. I had bifocals once, and just couldn't get used to the idea of tilting my head up to read things close, and tilting my head down for things more distant. I ended up taking them off to read, just as I do with normal glasses.

wdlove
Mar 31, 2004, 09:48 PM
It's not that. I had bifocals once, and just couldn't get used to the idea of tilting my head up to read things close, and tilting my head down for things more distant. I ended up taking them off to read, just as I do with normal glasses.

That's probably what make the difference in adjustment to bifocals. My glasses are the first thing that I do in the morning and the last thing I do at night. My clear eyesight is about once inch in front of my nose without glasses. As I said, I don't really remember even having to make much of an adjustment.