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fab5freddy
Mar 8, 2009, 06:46 PM
What does "chmod" mean in this context ?

2.) chmod click.dat to 666 using your FTP software.

thanks !



notjustjay
Mar 8, 2009, 07:04 PM
chmod is the name of a Unix command used to change file permissions.

"666" means read/write permissions are granted for everyone. The three numbers represent a file permission code for the owner of the file, the group of users that the owner is a part of, and everyone else. The "6" is a decimal representation of a 3-bit binary code representing whether you have permission to read a file, write to the file, or execute the file (e.g. a program).

Think of it this way: Add 4 points if you want the user to be able to read the file, 2 points if they can write to it, and 1 point if they can execute it. Access to a directory counts as 1 point as well.

So, for example, "644" would be a code meaning that the owner of the file has full read/write access, but everyone else can only read it. "740" would mean that the owner can read/write and execute the program, the people in the same user group can read the file but not run it, and everyone else has no access at all.

If you were running the command from the Terminal, you would literally type "chmod 666 click.dat".
You can often do this within the FTP software, and is typically required if you are, saying, uploading a script that wants to write to certain files or directories -- you need to set the permissions to allow it to do so.

louiek
Mar 8, 2009, 07:10 PM
It's asking you to change the permissions on the file click.dat to be readable and writable by your user, group and anyone else. Normally you'd just run the command

chmod 666 click.dat

in the directory the file resides in using terminal. As for the FTP bit, don't know, I haven't ftp'd since 1989.

fab5freddy
Mar 8, 2009, 07:47 PM
Regarding FTP......Is there something better out there now,
since you havent used FTP since 1989 ??

louiek
Mar 8, 2009, 07:53 PM
Perhaps I should have said that I haven't had a need to use it since 1989. I wasn't trying to be facetious.

lee1210
Mar 8, 2009, 07:58 PM
scp and sftp add encryption to authentication and transfer. FTP is unencrypted. If you don't mind someone being able to log in as you on the remote system, or you've secured the connection otherwise then FTP is fine.

-Lee

Peace
Mar 8, 2009, 07:59 PM
A lot of apps use FTP to transfer files. Adobe Dreamweaver and other Web design apps for example.

millerj123
Mar 8, 2009, 08:49 PM
scp and sftp add encryption to authentication and transfer. FTP is unencrypted. If you don't mind someone being able to log in as you on the remote system, or you've secured the connection otherwise then FTP is fine.

-Lee

A lot of apps use FTP to transfer files. Adobe Dreamweaver and other Web design apps for example.

A lot do. That doesn't make it a good idea. I'll +1 on Lee's suggestion of using scp or sftp unless it's across a VPN or other encrypted connection, at which point, yes, standard FTP is just fine.