PDA

View Full Version : C++ Editor for mac...




gtx8800
Mar 17, 2009, 08:09 PM
heeiii...i am looking for c++ editor for mac..???

what's do you recommend...???



lee1210
Mar 17, 2009, 08:18 PM
I personally recommend the terminal + vi.

Others seem to like XCode (installed from your OS X DVD or downloaded or register and download from http://developer.apple.com/mac/), which is an IDE that supports C++ development.

Others like editors like TextMate.

It depends on what you like/need. Are you going to compile at the terminal with gcc? Do you need an IDE?

The Eclipse IDE/"platform" is also available for OS X, and supports C++ development.

-Lee

lancewyoming
Mar 17, 2009, 08:56 PM
emacs

Paddrino
Mar 17, 2009, 09:30 PM
Komodo edit is a nice program if you like a nice interface. I've use it quite a while with perl, and it has some nice features.

http://www.activestate.com/komodo_edit/

p.s. It's open source and free. :) If you want some of the more advanced features you can get the pay version, but the free version works quite well.

ChrisA
Mar 18, 2009, 12:27 AM
Komodo edit is a nice program if you like a nice interface. I've use it quite a while with perl, and...

I checked it out and did not notice support for C++.

I use "nedit" about 9 hours a day. I like it because I need an editor that runs exactly the same on multiple platforms like Solaris, Linux and others. But if you are on the Mac exclusively then maybe you need to bother with an X11 program. But if you need multi-platform then X11 is the way to go. Nedit does syntax highlighting and multi-tab or split window editing
www.nedit.org

I've been using netbeans IDE for a Java project. It's not bad and I know it can also handle C and C++
http://www.netbeans.org/features/cpp/

You should spend an evening or so to learn vi. Only because it is universal and likey to be already installed on any non-Microsoft OS you will ever see.

lee1210
Mar 18, 2009, 12:33 AM
]
You should spend an evening or so to learn vi. Only because it is universal and likey to be already installed on any non-Microsoft OS you will ever see.

And hopefully any Microsoft OS used by a programmer... =)
(sorry Visual Studio folk)

-Lee

lancewyoming
Mar 18, 2009, 02:00 AM
Perhaps I should be more thoughtful and give a reason for my answer. As with vi, emacs will be likely be installed on any non-windows system you encounter. I would hope a developer would also have it on windows. Works from the terminal. Works from X11. Carbon and Cocoa versions available. Syntax highlighting. Automatic code formatting. Split buffer editing. Support for shell processes within editor. Great hooks for debuggers, compilers, version control systems, etc. Great support for virtually every language ever created. You could read your email or news or whatever from it. Extremely, no, ridiculously customizable.

A side benefit is once you have gotten used to the somewhat odd keystroke controls for emacs, you will be pleasantly surprised when you discover many of them work in all mac applications.

Bakerman
Mar 18, 2009, 02:03 AM
A side benefit is once you have gotten used to the somewhat odd keystroke controls for emacs, you will be pleasantly surprised when you discover many of them work in all mac applications.

I second that. Knowing the Emacs key bindings is extremely useful, given that on just about any system you will find an editor supporting those bindings. Not to mention any text control in Mac OS X (although the supported key bindings are a small subset of the Emacs key bindings).

As for editors, I would recommend SubEthaEdit. Emacs key bindings, syntax coloring for lots of languages, and a nice collaborative editing feature in case you need that.

And there is always XCode of course.

Cromulent
Mar 18, 2009, 07:18 AM
You should spend an evening or so to learn vi. Only because it is universal and likey to be already installed on any non-Microsoft OS you will ever see.

I've tried so many times, but always find myself going back to Nano / Pico instead.

Personally I would say Xcode or Smultron.

lazydog
Mar 18, 2009, 07:34 AM
Thumbs up for Xcode! I also find it useful for non Xcode projects too. I create a dummy empty, project and drag the root folder of the project into Xcode and select the recursive add as reference option. That way I can navigate all the files in the project really easily.

The one thing I don't like about Xcode is the way it highlights compilation errors with the red marker things. After a particular bad session with a lot of typos and mistakes, the editor windows look like it's covered in blood.

b e n