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View Full Version : Thirsty towns eye desalting plants


wdlove
Apr 10, 2004, 05:06 PM
To relieve chronic water shortages, several Massachusetts communities are considering plans to draw their drinking water from a vast but long off-limits source: the Atlantic Ocean.

http://www.boston.com/news/local/articles/2004/04/10/thirsty_towns_eye_desalting_plants/

Krizoitz
Apr 10, 2004, 05:23 PM
To relieve chronic water shortages, several Massachusetts communities are considering plans to draw their drinking water from a vast but long off-limits source: the Atlantic Ocean.

http://www.boston.com/news/local/articles/2004/04/10/thirsty_towns_eye_desalting_plants/

FWIW the have a term for this, desalinization. Its an interesting idea, but usually kinda expensive. Of course the technology these days is getting better.

bousozoku
Apr 10, 2004, 06:14 PM
FWIW the have a term for this, desalinization. Its an interesting idea, but usually kinda expensive. Of course the technology these days is getting better.

It's desalination and it's at the bottom of the article in brackets. I was beginning to think that the writer didn't know how to spell it, so she left it out.

Floriduh has been looking at the technology for a while, but they only waste money on experimenting with it while they drain the aquifer without a second thought. You'd think that more areas would be using a closed-loop water treatment system to allow the environment to thrive. Floriduh has been in a drought for many years, due to overuse and lack of replinishment.

wdlove
Apr 10, 2004, 06:52 PM
FWIW the have a term for this, desalinization. Its an interesting idea, but usually kinda expensive. Of course the technology these days is getting better.

Since they are starting to run out of water and it's so expensive they are turning desalinization. We definitely have the technological knowledge with BC, BU, Harvard, & MIT.

JesseJames
Apr 10, 2004, 09:54 PM
I think Americans just need to learn 'conservation' all over again. It use to be big in the mid-to-late Seventies. The Eighties - decade of excess - ruined it of course.
I know America was a bit more socialistic back then. But, in a way, it just felt better. Does anyone know what I mean? Nowadays, no one gives a crap about one another.
I could go on a rant but what's the use.
I've been seriously thinking about Canadian citizenship lately. It's getting that bad.

wdlove
Apr 10, 2004, 10:02 PM
I think Americans just need to learn 'conservation' all over again. It use to be big in the mid-to-late Seventies. The Eighties - decade of excess - ruined it of course.
I know America was a bit more socialistic back then. But, in a way, it just felt better. Does anyone know what I mean? Nowadays, no one gives a crap about one another.
I could go on a rant but what's the use.
I've been seriously thinking about Canadian citizenship lately. It's getting that bad.

Sadly I think that it is becoming more socialistic. Due to immigration from Mexico there are more in the wagon every day. How log do you think that those of us that are pulling the wagon are going to tolerate this and wake up. This is why the election this Fall is critical.

Sparky's
Apr 10, 2004, 10:44 PM
I think Americans just need to learn 'conservation' all over again. It use to be big in the mid-to-late Seventies. The Eighties - decade of excess - ruined it of course.
I know America was a bit more socialistic back then. But, in a way, it just felt better. Does anyone know what I mean? Nowadays, no one gives a crap about one another.
I could go on a rant but what's the use.
I've been seriously thinking about Canadian citizenship lately. It's getting that bad.

I grew up in CA (new old Mexico) my family lived there for 5 generations and I got sick of it...Anyway does anyone (no you're not old enough) to remember the San Fransiquito Valley dam in 1929? It failed, and as it swept it's way to the Pacific it killed hundreds of people. Mr Mulhullands big plan to squeeze every ounce of water from the Sierra Nevada and drain the Owens valley of water that was rightly theirs. The Owens valley was once a thriving area of orange groves and cattle ranches but now it's pretty much a desert thanks to Mulhulland. The Los Angeles Aqueduct is draining Mono lake at an alarming rate. Soon it too will be a dry lake bed.
People didn't care then and they sure as hell don't care now, it's just that there are more people being made aware of it, but nothing will change as long as money talks :mad:

bousozoku
Apr 10, 2004, 10:46 PM
Sadly I think that it is becoming more socialistic. Due to immigration from Mexico there are more in the wagon every day. How log do you think that those of us that are pulling the wagon are going to tolerate this and wake up. This is why the election this Fall is critical.

That's also why the president is trying to find a way for them to vote. :D :mad:

rainman::|:|
Apr 11, 2004, 08:42 AM
you people get 4 feet of precipitation a year, and you need to build desal plants? i think someone's just spending too much time in the shower. A lot of other places make due with a lot less fresh water.

paul

Sparky's
Apr 11, 2004, 06:14 PM
Paul, who are you referring to about 4' a year?

Not Mass. http://www.state.ma.us/dem/programs/rainfall/rainfall.htm

rainman::|:|
Apr 11, 2004, 06:28 PM
Paul, who are you referring to about 4' a year?

Not Mass. http://www.state.ma.us/dem/programs/rainfall/rainfall.htm

I was quoting the article:

The sea's newest use, however, brings with it fresh worries. Many of the plants are proposed in tidal rivers, where environmentalists say aquatic life may be harmed by powerful intake pipes and briny discharge. Public policy specialists look at such plants, some of which are privately owned, and worry that public water supplies could one day be sold to the highest bidder. And in a region that gets almost 4 feet of precipitation a year, others say that more plants are simply a Band-Aid on a problem that should be treated by deeper changes.

I don't know how much space they're encompassing when they say "region", but i should assume that means northern new england...

Having a hard time navigating that site, says it's under construction?

paul

Sparky's
Apr 11, 2004, 07:23 PM
I didn't. clicked on the link in your post and went right to it. :confused:

try this one http://www.state.ma.us/dem/programs/rainfall/drought.htm

Maybe the article also takes snow fall amount into account. but still when 12" of snow = 1" of rain that's still a lot for us. I live in Up-State NY next door to Mass. and I don't think we get 4' of rain a year, and if so then I would think that the northwest must get about 40'.

http://lwf.ncdc.noaa.gov/img/climate/research/2001/preann2001/trdata_Elem01_01122001_pg.gif

These don't break down the individual regions but still the map is maxed at 34"
there's probably more information on this page that is necessary and it is a couple of years old but It does mention drought conditions on the eastern seaboard. gotta scoll down a bit....
http://lwf.ncdc.noaa.gov/oa/climate/research/2001/preann2001/us-summary.html#Apcp

cyberddot
Apr 11, 2004, 08:36 PM
I live on the Oregon coast (70-80" of rain annually) and remember moving from Arizona in 1992..? To find that we had water restrictions in place due to low summer rainfall. We couldn't wash our cars, were only allowed to water plants after sunset, etc. This, after moving from Arizona, a state that creates communities around artificial water features and golf courses (that grass needs LOTS of water).

US citizens DO need to learn a bit more about taking responsibility for thier planet, by making wise choices close to home.

Awimoway
Apr 13, 2004, 02:59 AM
I've been seriously thinking about Canadian citizenship lately. It's getting that bad.

I agree. From decriminalizing pot to legalizing P2P, Canada is looking like a very nice place to live… And my wife is already a closet Canadian. But I don't really know how their conservation methods/lifestyle/resource shortages compare.


As for whether America is becoming socialistic by letting Mexicans in… Please. This country was built on immigration. And it has a very long history of so-called natives thinking there's no more room or resources for the newcomers. Just remember that there were people like you yelling at your ancestors when they came to America. Living near the border, I can attest that without Mexican immigration there would be precious few people around to fry our burgers, cut our lawns, and pick our produce because everyone who was born here is either too cool or too lazy to do these things.