PDA

View Full Version : New DVD player cuts out the smut


HexMonkey
Apr 10, 2004, 05:29 PM
I just saw this and thought it looked interesting. What do you guys think of it?

http://news.independent.co.uk/world/americas/story.jsp?story=510427

New DVD player cuts out the smut

By David Usborne in New York

Like some kind of electronic air freshener, a new generation of DVD players is poised to clear the smut, violence and bad language out of living rooms all across America.

Thomson Inc is preparing to ship the revolutionary machines to both Wal-Mart and Kmart in the United States in the next few weeks. The family-values brigade is already applauding, while the Hollywood community is pursuing a lawsuit to have them banned.

The players, which will sell for $79 (£45), are equipped with technology by a Salt Lake City-based company called ClearPlay. They will be pre-programmed to spare viewers segments of films that feature offensive language, excessive violence or sexual content, by muting the sound or skipping ahead.

Several leading Hollywood figures, however, including Steven Spielberg and Steven Soderbergh, are backing a lawsuit, arguing that the technology will violate the rights of directors who expect their works to be viewed in their entirety, without censorship.

"In the guise of making films 'family-friendly', ClearPlay seeks to make whatever 'edits' they see fit to any material they don't like," said the Directors Guild of America. "By not seeking the consent of the director, whose name on the movie reflects the fact that the film comprises his or her work, or of the studio as copyright holder, they can and do change the very meaning and intent of films."

The machines will be pre-programmed to edit about 500 titles. By inserting ordinary DVDs of these films, consumers will be able to select from 14 levels of filtering. Choose the top level and you might wonder what will be left of some of Hollwyood's more lurid offerings. What would the running time be for a tidied-up Arnold Schwarzenegger feature - two minutes?

Thomson, which markets its products under the RCA brand in America, decided to push ahead with the new players in spite of the lawsuit. "It's another example of a way technology can be used by a parent to monitor, if not control, what a child is seeing," said spokesman Dave Arland.

wdlove
Apr 10, 2004, 06:57 PM
Why would a parent purchases or rent a DVD with bad language, nudity, and violence in the first place? Whatever happened to parent discipline? I certainly wouldn't waste my money twice, first on the machine, and then the DVD. All you have to do is read.

bousozoku
Apr 10, 2004, 08:11 PM
As we've discussed in the past, many parents don't want to be responsible. Therefore, technology should be their nanny.

Did you see news about a recent report that t.v. for 1-2 year olds seems to contribute to ADHD/ADD? It should bring parents back to reading to their child.

miloblithe
Apr 10, 2004, 08:12 PM
boooo boooo!! I want more smut!!

question fear
Apr 10, 2004, 11:31 PM
not only that, but the technology is not yet smart enough to filter the good from the bad...i remember back when i was 15ish or so, looking for information on coming out as a lesbian, i found a website that pointed out a web filter would remove all references to homosexuality in an article, rendering it unreadable and useless. The article in question? Resources on and support for teens coming out and feeling depressed and suicidal (I don't know what the numbers are like now but back then the estimate was 1/3 of all teen suicides had to do with sexuality.) So these filters meant to "protect" kids were keeping information that could have reached out to someone out of their hands...sounds like these dvd players have that same discretionary power-what will this dvd player do if i put in, say, schindler's list? its incredibly important and educational, but will the dvd player "ok" my viewing it?

XnavxeMiyyep
Apr 10, 2004, 11:33 PM
Why are they doing something so incredibly stupid!? If you don't want to watch "smut", don't put it in your DVD Player!

question fear
Apr 10, 2004, 11:38 PM
Why are they doing something so incredibly stupid!? If you don't want to watch "smut", don't put it in your DVD Player!


because the evil presence of progress and independent filmmaking might tempt children into watching things that will cause them to go blind and steal their souls. you know, like lord of the rings and harry potter. something wicked this way comes....

(i realize LOTR barely qualifies as indie (wasn't it produced by the indie branch of the studio?), and harry potter definitely not, but i blanked on indie movies kids might see.

bousozoku
Apr 11, 2004, 01:13 AM
because the evil presence of progress and independent filmmaking might tempt children into watching things that will cause them to go blind and steal their souls. you know, like lord of the rings and harry potter. something wicked this way comes....

(i realize LOTR barely qualifies as indie (wasn't it produced by the indie branch of the studio?), and harry potter definitely not, but i blanked on indie movies kids might see.

Considering that LOTR and the Harry Potter books/films both deal with sorcery, many people feel that they are pure evil and should not be available to children. A couple of groups in this area have certainly made their thoughts known about how evil the Harry Potter books are.

Imagine if the kids find mum and dad's honeymoon video which they just transferred to DVD. This technology certainly wouldn't shield them from that. :eek:

sonyrules
Apr 11, 2004, 01:31 AM
I just saw this and thought it looked interesting. What do you guys think of it?

http://news.independent.co.uk/world/americas/story.jsp?story=510427

Looks like another parenting tool. I say they make one with barney on it spitting fire everytime a cuse word or sex sence is displayed...

whocares
Apr 11, 2004, 02:05 AM
Looks like another parenting tool. I say they make one with barney on it spitting fire everytime a cuse word or sex sence is displayed...

I would say another anti-parenting tool. It should be the parents deciding what there kids whatch, not some company in Salt Lake City.

rainman::|:|
Apr 11, 2004, 08:31 AM
not only that, but the technology is not yet smart enough to filter the good from the bad...i remember back when i was 15ish or so, looking for information on coming out as a lesbian, i found a website that pointed out a web filter would remove all references to homosexuality in an article, rendering it unreadable and useless. The article in question? Resources on and support for teens coming out and feeling depressed and suicidal (I don't know what the numbers are like now but back then the estimate was 1/3 of all teen suicides had to do with sexuality.) So these filters meant to "protect" kids were keeping information that could have reached out to someone out of their hands...sounds like these dvd players have that same discretionary power-what will this dvd player do if i put in, say, schindler's list? its incredibly important and educational, but will the dvd player "ok" my viewing it?

many people would rather their children suicide than come to terms with their own homosexuality. Years ago i was a gay teen suicide counselor, trust me when i say this, even tho it sounds absurd.

Censorship, What can be said that hasn't already happened in places like Nazi germany?

paul

iJon
Apr 11, 2004, 11:17 AM
i thought this was what the levels were for on the dvd's that parents could unlock and lock with the password. ive never played with it but my friend had real strict parents back in early jr high and elememantary and i remember his parents doing that.

iJon

Counterfit
Apr 11, 2004, 07:11 PM
many people would rather their children suicide than come to terms with their own homosexuality. Years ago i was a gay teen suicide counselor, trust me when i say this, even tho it sounds absurd. Well, in that situation, I personally would advise waiting for a bit to tell them, say until after you move out and become independent, or just getting the **** out of there. But that's OT ;)

This thing is yet another tool for the lazy parent.

oldschool
Apr 11, 2004, 11:59 PM
i tend to find that parents who shield their children from obscenities (swear words) usually end up with children who swear a lot more.

this is just my experience though.

MrMacMan
Apr 12, 2004, 12:52 AM
First off:
If I pop in a porno in there? Is it going to censor the whole thing or whats going on there?

Second:
There should be a technology the OPPOSITE of this!
Instead of 'drat' they replace it with 'damn'. Instead of a paper cut they have a blood spray.

Instead of a hot girl you get a nak... erm never mind. ;)


Come on World!

Where is the GOOD technology.

MarkCollette
Apr 12, 2004, 01:06 AM
As stupid as this seems, I hope that it will relieve pressure from media companies to self-censor their own creations. Instead of having to make everything bland, for high sales in middle America, they can make one true product, and whoever wants to can censor themselves.

Pity for the kids of prudes though ;)

rainman::|:|
Apr 12, 2004, 01:13 AM
As stupid as this seems, I hope that it will relieve pressure from media companies to self-censor their own creations. Instead of having to make everything bland, for high sales in middle America, they can make one true product, and whoever wants to can censor themselves.

Pity for the kids of prudes though ;)

that's very true, i never thought of that. i was just hearing about how companies are afraid to cross the line into nc-17 because of the 'porn' connotation... even tho 30 years ago, it was an acceptable rating to produce. There are a couple of NC-17 movies out now i think, to test the waters, but they're encountering hurdles as some theaters refuse to play them flat out :rolleyes:

paul

MarkCollette
Apr 12, 2004, 01:19 AM
[QUOTE=bousozoku]Considering that LOTR and the Harry Potter books/films both deal with sorcery, many people feel that they are pure evil and should not be available to children. A couple of groups in this area have certainly made their thoughts known about how evil the Harry Potter books are.
QUOTE]

Here's a sad story I just heard today. My Dad took his grandson, who is my newphew, to some Christmas party (they're all Christians). My nephew was crying because he was worried that if he got the present he wanted, which was a Harry Potter lego set, then his mother wouldn't allow him to keep it.

Tell me if I'm crazy, but I simply plan on telling my kids, before they read the Potter books, that magic is make believe. Like Santa Claus, it's just some fun and fanciful thing that people amuse themselves with.

I think that the only thing I have against those books is that because the main character has trust issues, he tends not to tell his friends or elders certain things, which leads to trouble later on. Children should know to trust their parents. Other than that, I think they're great for kids.

Especially that rules are only for those who need rules. See them break a few, realise it's not so bad, break some more, get hurt a bit, and learn rules are there to protect those who lack experience or judgement. Treat them as guidelines.

Err, I think I've digressed a bit... :)

MarkCollette
Apr 12, 2004, 01:20 AM
that's very true, i never thought of that. i was just hearing about how companies are afraid to cross the line into nc-17 because of the 'porn' connotation... even tho 30 years ago, it was an acceptable rating to produce. There are a couple of NC-17 movies out now i think, to test the waters, but they're encountering hurdles as some theaters refuse to play them flat out :rolleyes:
paul

Maybe the media companies don't mind that so much. Then they can sell the theatrical version first, and later sell the "real" director's cut, and have a couple double-sells :)

Kingsnapped
Apr 12, 2004, 01:28 AM
So is this thing connected to the internet, or have a slot for smartcards of somekind? Would DVD studios have to write this extra code for the player, or would they not bother until it gets a massive market share. The whole idea seems pretty impractical to me. It's more of a device for false peace of mind.

Raid
Apr 12, 2004, 10:54 AM
<sigh> :( While I don't like this "quick fix" idea for parents who are all to willing to delegate their child rearing responsibilities, I can't help but think of the novety factor of this product. Imagine what it would be like watching "Scarface", or "American Pie" on this thing. They'd be about 20 minutes of almost random clips! :) It would be hilarious to see how badly these get chopped! Ok so those movies aren't for kids and I'd hope even lazy parents wouldn't let their kids watch them.

On the other hand I wonder if it would chop out things from Disney movies like the Mufasa's death scene, or the scenes in Monsters inc where the monsters scare little children? Both of those in particular I remember leading to some discussions with my friends little kids. With very healthy and helpful outcomes.

idkew
Apr 12, 2004, 01:21 PM
Why would a parent purchases or rent a DVD with bad language, nudity, and violence in the first place? Whatever happened to parent discipline? I certainly wouldn't waste my money twice, first on the machine, and then the DVD. All you have to do is read.

I agree. Parents are supposed to raise their children. NOT the government, or any other entity.

damax452
Apr 12, 2004, 01:34 PM
Yes, remove everything from movies that imitates life, and makes them interesting. Great idea. This one can't lose.

MongoTheGeek
Apr 12, 2004, 03:16 PM
I don't have a problem with it. I wouldn't pay for one. I keep my son away from materials I don't think he can handle or should see. In the event of a lapse in vigilance or after material at the edge there is a frank discussion.

I do agree that this encourages people to use technology as a crutch but we use technology as such a crutch anyway...

Makosuke
Apr 12, 2004, 06:14 PM
Sounds like a retread of age-old prudish censorship and lazy parenting assistance, but at least the films are hand-edited, so it's not as bad as an indiscriminate internet filter.

That said, I can actually think of a rather strage use for this thingy. Say there's a movie I think would be worthwhile for my kids to see, or that they'll enjoy and is mostly suitable for them. But, there're a couple of sexual or particularly violent scenes that I don't feel are appropriate for them. When I was young, my parents would just tell us to cover my eyes, or fast forward a bit, or change the channel for a minute. I'd probably do the same instead of prohibiting them from seeing the movies entirely.

So, if I had a device that would automatically fast-forward for me, it'd be handy. It's a shoddy substitute to paying attention to what your kids watch (and I sure wouldn't let them watch anything at all, even with something like this kicked in), but I could see it being a bit of a hassle saver in a specific situation.

Incidentally, I had fun a couple of times watching some erotic anime (not hardcore, by the way--plot included) with a stopwatch, and seeing how short it'd be if you cut out everything offensive. 30 minutes down to 2 was the verdict--basically about three scenes of people walking on the street and the title left.

MongoTheGeek
Apr 12, 2004, 06:46 PM
Incidentally, I had fun a couple of times watching some erotic anime (not hardcore, by the way--plot included) with a stopwatch, and seeing how short it'd be if you cut out everything offensive. 30 minutes down to 2 was the verdict--basically about three scenes of people walking on the street and the title left.

I was at CastleCon a few years ago and Lloyd Kaufman was a special guest. He showed the recently released Sgt Kabukiman NYPD and said that it was available in 3 versions Unraed, Rated R and Ready for TV viewing. The person next to me quipped, yeah 2 hours 1.5 hours and 15 minutes.

bousozoku
Apr 12, 2004, 08:07 PM
Here's a sad story I just heard today. My Dad took his grandson, who is my newphew, to some Christmas party (they're all Christians). My nephew was crying because he was worried that if he got the present he wanted, which was a Harry Potter lego set, then his mother wouldn't allow him to keep it.

Tell me if I'm crazy, but I simply plan on telling my kids, before they read the Potter books, that magic is make believe. Like Santa Claus, it's just some fun and fanciful thing that people amuse themselves with.

...


I took a while to think about whether I could answer this without offending anyone. :) I hope I accomplish that.

That is sad that he can't enjoy a gift because someone else is offended. Parents, of course, have the right to make some choices for their children. So often, I see choices that I cannot understand. If you don't expose your children to a wide spectrum of things, some limits applied, how do they know right from wrong or how to differentiate things on their own?

I'm certainly not going to call you crazy for telling your kids that magic is make believe. Many people believe that, along with a plethora of other things. As they say, children don't come with a manual and no matter how many people give you their opinions, you have to figure some things out by yourself. :)

Sparky's
Apr 12, 2004, 08:10 PM
Just another reason I won't shop at Walmart or Kmart

Dippo
Apr 12, 2004, 11:11 PM
Several leading Hollywood figures, however, including Steven Spielberg and Steven Soderbergh, are backing a lawsuit, arguing that the technology will violate the rights of directors who expect their works to be viewed in their entirety, without censorship.

Can anyone tell me why they are suing??
Can the movie industry really force us to watch every second of a movie?

I think it would be much better for parents to censor at home then to have the government censor for everybody.

Counterfit
Apr 13, 2004, 01:58 AM
Can anyone tell me why they are suing??
Can the movie industry really force us to watch every second of a movie?

I think it would be much better for parents to censor at home then to have the government censor for everybody. The problem is not "you watching it" it's a third party editing the movie without the consent of the director and/or studio. And before some wag says "well what about edited for TeeVee movies?" Those have been edited, most likely, with the consent of the studio, if no the director.

Awimoway
Apr 13, 2004, 02:30 AM
The problem is not "you watching it" it's a third party editing the movie without the consent of the director and/or studio. And before some wag says "well what about edited for TeeVee movies?" Those have been edited, most likely, with the consent of the studio, if no the director.

I'm not buying this argument. I can get up during a movie and come back later, I can fast forward part of it, etc. There's nothing the director can do to stop me. It's my right. And I fail to see how the "approved edit" is any less detrimental to the original intent of the movie than someone else's edit. I'm not even convinced most directors have anything to do with airplane or broadcast tv edits. Some lackey in an editing room is probably doing it, his/her work overseen by the network, not the director. And I think a lot of artists take themselves and their work way too seriously. You can't really believe a pic like Dude, Where's My Car had ANY artistic intent. It seems to me that the only reason they allow such approved edits is for the money, and it reeks of hypocrisy.


That being said, this DVD player idea is ludicrous. I used to live in Utah, and I know exactly where this kind of sentiment comes from. It's an extremely conservative (values-wise, I mean, but politically too) state, with the all the inherent contradictions that come with it—the desire to avoid anything unseemly and the incongruous desire to be a part of American capitalist culture, to feel cool and worldly.

But you can't have it both ways. These people need to either quit watching movies they don't fully approve of or quit feigning values they're not fully committed to (speaking only of the hypocrites there, not everyone).

MrMacMan
Apr 14, 2004, 09:01 PM
Awimoway -- Your the consumer, you have the write to make the changed because its yours.


With the DVD player the edits are transparent... such as you never notice (well depending if they cut you have like little censor logos over the offending body parts) or DO notice the changes.

I respect that the movie makers don't want their stuff changed and edited without their approval...

Its not like I can go edit and butcher half of star wars II to make it better and pass it off as the offical thing... which if I understand this would be doing.



Basically I want to put this to the test:
I want to Pop in Kill Bill Vol. 1 and since there is little swearing and only 1 scene with sexual content... what is this going to do? Cut the blood somehow? :confused:

Awimoway
Apr 14, 2004, 09:36 PM
Awimoway -- Your the consumer, you have the write to make the changed because its yours.

Seems like a pretty fine line to me: Make the cuts myself or save time and let a machine do it for me. For that matter, let someone else do it for me. I have a right to consent to let someone else determine how much I see and hear. It's idiotic to do that, sure, but I think I have the right to do it.

MrMacMan
Apr 15, 2004, 09:19 PM
Seems like a pretty fine line to me: Make the cuts myself or save time and let a machine do it for me. For that matter, let someone else do it for me. I have a right to consent to let someone else determine how much I see and hear. It's idiotic to do that, sure, but I think I have the right to do it.
No but in both those cases you either do it yourself or get someone to do it for you.

I mean even if you get the dvd player -- Its automattically doing it. They want it manually cut out -- Like on TV.


I mean this simplifies it so much, soo much of the movie could be gone.