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mav814
Mar 29, 2009, 06:52 PM
So I have committed to spending any reasonable amount of money on a physical book that will help me understand objective C programming. I have gone through the forums and seen plenty of options, but before I actually invest myself and base my learnings off one book, I would like to know which book is (I know its somewhat relative) is the best at allowing one to understand the basics, hit the learning curve, and apply what they learn. Please put the name of the book and why. Thanks!



CarlosH
Mar 29, 2009, 07:56 PM
So I have committed to spending any reasonable amount of money on a physical book that will help me understand objective C programming. I have gone through the forums and seen plenty of options, but before I actually invest myself and base my learnings off one book, I would like to know which book is (I know its somewhat relative) is the best at allowing one to understand the basics, hit the learning curve, and apply what they learn. Please put the name of the book and why. Thanks!

I used Programming in Objective-C( Amazon link: http://www.amazon.com/Programming-Objective-C-Developers-Library-Stephen/dp/0672325861, and it have been very useful, I have a strong c/c++ base, so I use it mostly for reference, but it is for beginners too.

Hope it helps you make a decision.:)

mav814
Mar 29, 2009, 09:19 PM
I used Programming in Objective-C( Amazon link: http://www.amazon.com/Programming-Objective-C-Developers-Library-Stephen/dp/0672325861, and it have been very useful, I have a strong c/c++ base, so I use it mostly for reference, but it is for beginners too.

Hope it helps you make a decision.:)


You very much did help. I actually am buying the updated version of this book on amazon.com after seeing good reviews and your suggestion. Thanks.

blackmesa
Mar 30, 2009, 09:52 AM
This one: Beginning iPhone Programming (http://www.amazon.com/Beginning-iPhone-Development-Exploring-SDK/dp/1430216263/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1238424656&sr=1-1) did the trick for me

ataylor2009
Mar 30, 2009, 10:39 AM
I went through the whole "What should I read?" problem (am, in fact, still going through it, to some extent) starting a couple of years ago when I wanted to learn Objective-C. I finally got so frustrated that I started putting together a personal wiki to help me keep it all straight.

You can check it out here:

http://cocoanewbie.pbwiki.com/

I started out thinking it'd be sort of a giant, cross-referenced book report, but I think it's turning into an all-around Cocoa, Objective-C and iPhone programming reference site. It's taking a while to get all the info posted (currently I'm the only contributor), but I'm working on it steadily.

CocoaPuffs
Mar 30, 2009, 11:01 AM
Only way to learn is to use the codes. You can have all the books in the world and read them religiously, but it won't make much sense if all you do is reading them. With that said, I think just about any book you find with decent reviews is worth buying, rest is up to you.

ataylor2009
Mar 30, 2009, 11:07 AM
Only way to learn is to use the codes. You can have all the books in the world and read them religiously, but it won't make much sense if all you do is reading them. With that said, I think just about any book you find with decent reviews is worth buying, rest is up to you.

...this is [sort of] true. The problem is when you start typing in code without understanding a) why you're typing it, b) what it means, and c) how to fix it if it doesn't work (which happens frequently), you end up getting even more frustrated.

A perfect example is Erica Sadun's book (The iPhone Developer's Cookbook). If you flip through the book looking for, say, an example that shows you how to connect your app to the Address Book and allow you to select a contact, you will find a snippet of code that purports to do just that. The problem is, because there's no context for that snippet, a beginner is unable to make use of it. You can cut and paste it into an Xcode project, but it won't work. And, without some kind of knowledge base to work from, not only will you not know what's wrong with it or how to fix it, but you won't even know how to ask for help to make it work.

So, yes, working through the code examples is a good idea. But you're going to have to study the rest of the material, too, and it wouldn't hurt to do the practice exercises that a lot of the books offer.

CocoaPuffs
Mar 30, 2009, 11:12 AM
By all means, I don't suggest anyone to jump straight into iPhone programming without understanding the basic. I thought we were talking about Objective-C programming books?

And yes, I heard the same reviews about her book. Good thing I just flip through it in Barnes & Nobles and said no thank you.

ataylor2009
Mar 30, 2009, 11:37 AM
Sorry - I didn't mean to sound like I was grouching at your post. You were exactly right - you have to work through the code in order to get proficient at this. I just wanted to add that you have to read the rest of the book, too - no matter what the book is.