PDA

View Full Version : will iMac G4 value rise over time?




ls206
Mar 30, 2009, 06:46 PM
Hi,

I'm asking on behalf of my parents who have an old G4 (700MHz version) iMac.
they were thinking of selling it, but I wondered whether it would be worth keeping it for a while if the value starts to rise with time.

I'm not really clued up on "antique" apples, but I know some people like to collect them.

what's the best plan of action?
Sell now, or pack away to sell another year/decade.

Thanks for reading.



Schtumple
Mar 30, 2009, 06:59 PM
Considering the iMac G3's sell for about 35, I'd say it'll be a long time before the value picks up on those things...

tdhurst
Mar 30, 2009, 07:00 PM
Yeah, um no.

Maclarny
Mar 30, 2009, 07:14 PM
I would not rule out the value of the G4 iMac several decades from now. In my opinion, it may prove to be one of the most unique personal computers which was made over the past decade. Even if it does not draw value as a collectible, it could yield profound sentimental value as a unique piece of computing history.

soldierblue
Mar 30, 2009, 07:19 PM
lolno

ls206
Mar 30, 2009, 07:30 PM
alrighty, thanks for the responses

jnc
Mar 31, 2009, 08:24 AM
If you mean like, in 50 years, maybe.

In the more immediate future, no, they'll only go down.

I'm hunting for a affordable 1.25GHz G4 20 inch, 1.5GB Ram, Airport + Bluetooth right now as it happens. :D

hazza.jockel
Mar 31, 2009, 08:57 AM
I got my g4 about a week ago for $0. so i guess it can only go up for me :D

Courtaj
Mar 31, 2009, 12:48 PM
By the time it's worth anything as a relic or antique, it'll be dead. And so will we.

SkippyThorson
Mar 31, 2009, 12:54 PM
I would not rule out the value of the G4 iMac several decades from now. In my opinion, it may prove to be one of the most unique personal computers which was made over the past decade. Even if it does not draw value as a collectible, it could yield profound sentimental value as a unique piece of computing history.

Amen. I can't imagine selling mine, simply because it marks a time where design was at the pinnacle of being as grand as the machine it housed. Historical. :)

opeter
Mar 31, 2009, 01:04 PM
Amen. I can't imagine selling mine, simply because it marks a time where design was at the pinnacle of being as grand as the machine it housed. Historical. :)

That is what you think. Well, it will be worth (maybe) something in a couple of hundred years! The problem is, the electronics in these machines will least maybe 20-30 years (modern stuff has a guaranteed life of what? 5 years?).

A letter on paper will always have some value. Why? Because you can read it/use it also after some 100 years later. The same can't be told for a computer, since it won't work. It will be just like any tech-crap, that you can see in today's technical museums (aka old locomotive, old plane, old car etc.).

It will have a value only in the case, that there will exist one or maybe a couple of them (but not some 100.000 pieces).

SkippyThorson
Mar 31, 2009, 08:51 PM
That is what you think. Well, it will be worth (maybe) something in a couple of hundred years! The problem is, the electronics in these machines will least maybe 20-30 years (modern stuff has a guaranteed life of what? 5 years?).

A letter on paper will always have some value. Why? Because you can read it/use it also after some 100 years later. The same can't be told for a computer, since it won't work. It will be just like any tech-crap, that you can see in today's technical museums (aka old locomotive, old plane, old car etc.).

It will have a value only in the case, that there will exist one or maybe a couple of them (but not some 100.000 pieces).

Perhaps you didn't read what I said. I'm not selling it only because of sentimental value. Never did I argue it would be worth millions.

You just argued my personal belief that it was a historical design. Why on earth would you go off rambling about it's innards decaying and thus having no resale value? I was and am aware of that.

stevesmac
Apr 5, 2009, 09:16 PM
Im a bit sentimental over Apple stuff. Funny cos we use pc's at work but I got an old 11e, an early Macintosh, a G3 a G4 17" an eMac. Just love em . All but the first 2 are connected to the internet. Just won on eBay the Anniversary model - totally useless for anything but what an icon of design! They got no value but I just love the design of each. Sad really!

Poncho
Apr 6, 2009, 06:39 AM
Do you mean this Anniversary model? The 30th Anniversary?

Must be worth a bomb...

http://www.macosxhints.com/article.php?story=20060331205742408&lsrc=osxh

Airforcekid
Apr 6, 2009, 06:51 AM
In 20+ years yes thats why I still use my G3 it will be worth something in the future.

Hugh
Apr 6, 2009, 07:04 PM
That is what you think. Well, it will be worth (maybe) something in a couple of hundred years! The problem is, the electronics in these machines will least maybe 20-30 years (modern stuff has a guaranteed life of what? 5 years?).

A letter on paper will always have some value. Why? Because you can read it/use it also after some 100 years later. The same can't be told for a computer, since it won't work. It will be just like any tech-crap, that you can see in today's technical museums (aka old locomotive, old plane, old car etc.).

It will have a value only in the case, that there will exist one or maybe a couple of them (but not some 100.000 pieces).


I don't know, my Apple ][+ still works. :D Although the power supply to my ROM 03 //gs died a year ago. :(

Back on topic, I have sold some of the old Apple // stuff on ebay and made a pretty penny. I would sell now though, 20 years have past to make the Apple // worth something.

Hugh

stevesmac
Apr 6, 2009, 10:50 PM
Do you mean this Anniversary model? The 30th Anniversary?

Must be worth a bomb...

http://www.macosxhints.com/article.php?story=20060331205742408&lsrc=osxh

No Its the 25th Anniversary, 175 worth of machine . Mint condition but sooooo sloooooow!. Its non upgradeable I believe.
Steve