PDA

View Full Version : Overclocking a 1.5GHz powerbook...


invaLPsion
Apr 23, 2004, 09:22 PM
Is there any way to overclock a powerbook using a program?

Is there any way at all?

Could you safely overclock the processor? (to 1.6 maybe?) I know someone OC'd an eMac from 1 to 1.4.

hugemullens
Apr 23, 2004, 09:24 PM
Overclocking a $2800 laptop.............sounds like the best idea i've ever heard.

haiggy
Apr 23, 2004, 10:17 PM
Overclocking a $2800 laptop.............sounds like the best idea i've ever heard.

Lmao hahaha so true

Sparky's
Apr 24, 2004, 10:57 PM
Do I dare ask? I see all this talk about "overclocking" with the PC world and or Mac CPUs. Would someone please tell me what the H*** it's supposed to acomplish. Is it the "Need for Speed" with someones ego or something?

Sun Baked
Apr 24, 2004, 11:01 PM
Is it the "Need for Speed" with someones ego or something?Actually it is sounding like the penis pill spam didn't work to well, so they're having to compensate some other way.

Why else would somebody do surgery on a $2800 laptop device?

saabmp3
Apr 25, 2004, 12:19 AM
No software that you can run on OSX is going to over clock your laptop. If you really want it faster (and it won't go too must faster), you'll have to pull it apart and either find the multiplier for the processor or the FSB controls in hardware. Ususally you can short out or un short pins (or traces) to change these values.

Honnestly, if your even THINKING of doing this, I would suggest buying a cheap desktop and learning everything you can about overclocking on it. Overclocking x86 laptops is hard, with all the heat. Overclocking small form factor x86 is harder with all the heat.

Overclocking a small form factor PPC processor with very little knowledge of teh chip is damn near impossible. I think you have better chances of jumping off a tall building and surviving.

This is a project best left to the pro's and if you've noticed....there's not a whole lot of them doing it.

BEN

Mav451
Apr 25, 2004, 12:31 AM
Most people in the PC world overclock with tower. Likewise in the Mac world, the overclocks in the G4 world are also with the tower models...how many have you heard overclocking their PBook though?

Laptops, as it is, are extremely sensitive in their thermal management. Because they take so little space, any significant changes in heat output (from overclocking) are probably going to destroy your laptop. It doesn't matter what architecture it is, laptops are not going to overclock.

If you DO want to overclock, I suggest you go with either Intel's Pentium 4 2.4Ghz (C processor, 800fsb)...or on the AMD side, now the AMD Mobile Barton (2500-M or 2400-M).

These replace the 1700+ and 2100+ traditional Thoroughbred B's. Anyway, if you need help doing AMD OCing, I can help :) Additional forum support for overclocking can be found at nforcershq.com

-edit-
Nice lil blurb on the Mobile Bartons (you can use them in desktops!)
http://www.neoseeker.com/Articles/Hardware/Features/XP-M/index.html

Grokgod
Apr 25, 2004, 01:43 AM
I think we should applaud this persons ingenuity!

Surely anyone that would be so bold as to willingly sacrifice his hard earned cash that was spent on a Powerbook, is a brave soul and demands our respect.

Imagine all the engineers and designers that work at Apple struggling to make these laptops work within specific engineering specifications.
For god knows how long getting everything as best as can be created and still there are heating issues etc.

But this brave lad has the balls to just jump in and overclock his Powerbook.

Ready to risk everything for a huge 100 extra mules.
Genius, or is it that there is too much time on your hands and not enough work. Get to work and forget this nonsense!

Mac's are for working with not overclocking.
Overclocking is for the delusionary world of Windoze.

"Hey watch me make the brick fly faster and crash through that window"

Bear
Apr 25, 2004, 05:56 AM
Is there any way to overclock a powerbook using a program?

Is there any way at all?

Could you safely overclock the processor? (to 1.6 maybe?) I know someone OC'd an eMac from 1 to 1.4.The eMac probably had a processor that supported the higher clock frequencies in it.

The Powerbook's 1.5GHz processor is running at its top rated speed. And knowing Motorola, it probably doesn't work much past that.

Also, as others have mentioned, heat disipation is a much more impotant issue for a laptop style computer.

Tell you what - if you have money to trow away playing with laptops like that, send me some money.

CrackedButter
Apr 25, 2004, 06:17 AM
The difference between genius and insanity is measured only by success.

blue&whiteman
Apr 25, 2004, 09:18 AM
overclocking often causes data corruption and also shortens the life of a cpu. anyone who does it (especially on a new machine) is an idiot in my opinion. don't do it!

NusuniAdmin
Apr 25, 2004, 09:27 AM
No software that you can run on OSX is going to over clock your laptop.

Well not 100% true, you can overclock the cache speed via programs, which is a form of overclocking. Right now my beige's cache is running at 333 mhz even though the processor only supports up to 250. Only apps that have problems handling that: photoshop 7 and ichat. Whenever I run those they crash the whole system for some reason, oh well. I use powerlogix cache director thingy to do it.

personally I think overclocking is a waste of time look at benchmarks of 1.33 ghz g4 vs 1.5 ghz and is is barely any different. So I doubt an extra few mhz would make a noticable difference. Plus you risk damaging an expensive computer.

BTW: has anyone seen benchmarks of a 1.5 ghz pbook and dual 1.42 ghz pmac, i have seen the g5 compared to it but no dual g4, it would be very interesting to see.

invaLPsion
Apr 25, 2004, 09:29 AM
LOL. Yea, I'm one damned crazy fool. heh heh! :D :eek:

Actually when the 900MHz G3 iBooks came out I was hearing something about how one person developed software to overclock the computer. The person successfully OC'd their processor to 1.1GHz from 900MHz and it ran safely.

Don't worry, boys. I won't risk the health of my new baby. ;)

NusuniAdmin
Apr 25, 2004, 09:50 AM
Don't worry, boys. I won't risk the health of my new baby. ;)

You better not!!! *ties invaLPsion up to a chair and puts handcuffs on his/her hands*

invaLPsion
Apr 25, 2004, 10:05 AM
You better not!!! *ties invaLPsion up to a chair and puts handcuffs on his/her hands*

(his) LOL :D :p

baby duck monge
Apr 25, 2004, 12:05 PM
You better not!!! *ties invaLPsion up to a chair and puts handcuffs on his/her hands*

while this happens, i sneak in through the back door and take the computer. and see that it is good. and there is much rejoicing. :D

Mav451
Apr 25, 2004, 01:14 PM
overclocking often causes data corruption and also shortens the life of a cpu. anyone who does it (especially on a new machine) is an idiot in my opinion. don't do it!

Wow. Sounds like somebody hasn't overclocked correctly before. I've run my computer for 2 years on these settings now. 2 years. The reason there isn't data corruption is because I took several days to test it and stress it to make sure there would be no data corruption down the road. It does not shorten the life of a cpu unless you put a ridiculous amt. of voltage through it. My cpu defaults at 1.6v; going to 1.675 is not that bad. Going to 1.85 will make a lot a heat, but is still within the limits. Going to 1.9, however, is when you begin to need Prometia, LN2, or water-cooling. Or obnoxiously loud air cooling if you can't afford the first 3 :)

Data corruption occurs only if you overclock haphazardly, e.g., if you don't know what you are doing. This is why the good people at nforcershq.com have developed exclusive FAQs for novices to read and to understand before overclocking.

For example, for my mobo alone, look at the information available:
http://nforcershq.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=15496&sid=d4c7ea113678a9ac4f5f7abab2a71c45 (overall tutorials)
http://nforcershq.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=23939&highlight=faq&sid=d4c7ea113678a9ac4f5f7abab2a71c45 (specific overclocking tutorial)

And someone else said:
Mac's are for working with not overclocking.
Overclocking is for the delusionary world of Windoze.
I'm sorry if your overclocking experiences were dissatisfactory. But it is not a delusionary technique. My processor began as a 2100+, operating at 1730mhz.

If I can run it at 2,133mhz just as easily, why shouldn't i? It is not dangerous if you actually know what you are doing. It is dangerous, if and only if, you are doing it for the first time and THINK you know what you are doing (newbies). That is the most dangerous part. Which is all the more reason to learn up on it at a forum like [www.nforcershq.com]

Bhennies
Apr 25, 2004, 02:08 PM
Will it even help you that much? My understanding is that the 1.5 ghz aren't even performing that much better than the 1.25's on xbench and barefeats. It's the system bus that's strangling everything else.

Grokgod
Apr 25, 2004, 02:41 PM
Looks like your talking about overclocking a AMD box, I think that we are speaking about the Mac's world of laptops where our laptops have been designed to fit within certain limits and that these laptops are highly prized item.

Not some beige box that can be replaced on the cheap and is used to play games and use AIM.

My side is that I feel that Mac's are used in the Designers community and that WORK is its main purpose and to get a paltry increase in speed is not worth the voided warrenty and problems.

Intel or AMD boxes have different specs from APPLE laptops, better ram speeds or FSB and upping the CPU may be useful with AMD although it is debatable as to how useful anything that runs Windoze is! and a Beige unit is not a laptop.

So i stand by my previous statement that WORK is far more important to accomplish than the false delusions of tinkering so prominant in the Winblows world.

Its like the the grunt that tweaks his hemi endlessly in the front yard disturbing his neighbours with false machoism, only to be stuck in traffic with the rest of us burning 4 times the fuel.

Boring.

Mav451
Apr 25, 2004, 02:46 PM
Grok I already stated in one of my first posts that overclocking is for desktop towers, not laptops. I don't even think we're arguing on the same thing.

Most people in the PC world overclock with tower. Likewise in the Mac world, the overclocks in the G4 world are also with the tower models...how many have you heard overclocking their PBook though?


If you want to see the performance difference between me running my 2100+ @ stock (1730mhz) and (2200mhz), here's an example:
http://www.gamepc.com/labs/view_content.asp?id=axp2700&page=8

Look at the 2100+, then the 2700+ (closest in clock to mine).

Another pic:
http://www.gamepc.com/labs/view_content.asp?id=axp2700&page=5

Who doesn't want another 10 frames in a game? When you play many of the more prominent PC game shooter titles, any gains in frames per second make for a smoother experience.

Grokgod
Apr 25, 2004, 02:48 PM
okay sorry! :D

Was it still ok to have fun posting it? :rolleyes:

invaLPsion
Apr 25, 2004, 03:24 PM
Will it even help you that much? My understanding is that the 1.5 ghz aren't even performing that much better than the 1.25's on xbench and barefeats. It's the system bus that's strangling everything else.

That's because people have been xbenching their laptops with the energy saver set to default. Someone set their energy saver to default on a 12 inch 1.33 and got 100. Then they set it to highest performance and got 128. Big difference.

Mav451
Apr 25, 2004, 03:26 PM
Because of the prominence of gaming in the PC world, overall, overclocking has always primarily been done to increase gaming performance...mainly the fps in a first person shooters (UT, UT2k4, CS, Battlefield 1942, etc.)

I mean, to be competitive, you want the smoothest experience right? If you could potentially gain 10-15fps, with a slight increase in voltage to the cpu, memory, and some small changes in the memory timings, would you hesistate to do it? (again provided you know how of course)

Many gamers, of course, would not hesitate. However, just as many gamers, also, are not risk-takers and don't see the need to. That's the beauty of having such a huge market with PC's. You benefit from niche communities. Overclockers benefit from learning from this considerably smaller tweaking community (in the PC world).

And without spending money on a new cpu. Why should you have to buy another, when you can use existing parts for more performance?

However, the benefits of these changes are not just limited to games! These changes also means that apps like Maya or Photoshop can be run faster as well.

Mav451
Apr 25, 2004, 03:37 PM
wow I just got an idea. For those who understand the G4...is the G4 in the PBook a different size than the ones used in the eMac/iMac? From what I understand in the PC world, mobile versions typically run at a much lower voltage (thus, if you raise the voltage in a mobile version, you can get higher clock speed running the mobile chip in a tower)

blue&whiteman
Apr 25, 2004, 04:13 PM
wow I just got an idea. For those who understand the G4...is the G4 in the PBook a different size than the ones used in the eMac/iMac? From what I understand in the PC world, mobile versions typically run at a much lower voltage (thus, if you raise the voltage in a mobile version, you can get higher clock speed running the mobile chip in a tower)

to the best of my knowledge all of the G4 chips are identical.

Mav451
Apr 25, 2004, 04:15 PM
to the best of my knowledge all of the G4 chips are identical.

Oh boo. That's no fun at all :(

topicolo
Apr 25, 2004, 04:16 PM
overclocking often causes data corruption and also shortens the life of a cpu. anyone who does it (especially on a new machine) is an idiot in my opinion. don't do it!

Gee, I didn't think I was too stupid in overclocking my old celeron 300A to 450Mhz a few years ago. The celeron chip cost $200CAN and at 450Mhz, ran slightly faster the $1100CAN P2 450Mhz chip at the time. That computer lasted me 3 years--until my next upgrade.

Of course, you could call me stupid for buying a pc, but that's a different matter.

blue&whiteman
Apr 25, 2004, 05:06 PM
Gee, I didn't think I was too stupid in overclocking my old celeron 300A to 450Mhz a few years ago. The celeron chip cost $200CAN and at 450Mhz, ran slightly faster the $1100CAN P2 450Mhz chip at the time. That computer lasted me 3 years--until my next upgrade.

Of course, you could call me stupid for buying a pc, but that's a different matter.


I have heard that the celeron can be overclocked like crazy. glad you got so much use out of it and saved all that money. I meant idiot in a only harming yourself way. :)

idkew
Apr 25, 2004, 07:20 PM
No software that you can run on OSX is going to over clock your laptop.
BEN

i wouldn't be so hasty. there is a possible firmware hack out there yet to be developed.


most likely it would require a change in jumpers, but it could be accomplished with a firmware modification.

Sparky's
Apr 25, 2004, 07:44 PM
I still don't understand the reasons, but in my research I found there are those out there doing quite well.

http://forums.macnn.com/showthread.php?threadid=188573

http://homepage.mac.com/giantmike/tests/overclocking.html

http://www.spymac.com/forums/showthread.php?threadid=74331&goto=lastpost

even G3s
http://www.lowendmac.com/macdan/02/0710ek.html

I just wish someone would take the time to explain what overclocking is and what benefits if any are achieved.

Mac_Max
Apr 25, 2004, 07:49 PM
to the best of my knowledge all of the G4 chips are identical.

The G4s the Powerbooks use are the PPC 7447 which is different from the 7457, which is the desktop counterpart, because of the lack of L3 Cache Circuitry. Because of this the 7447 can't use an L3 Cache but uses less power & creates less heat. Past powerbooks that have had an L3 Cache used the PPC 7455 which was the G4 used in the last Power Mac G4s. The iBook G4 800, 933, & 1GHz (14") used the PPC 7445 which is just like the 7447 in the way that it is missing its L3 cache circuitry. Heres how you find what CPU you have.

Cut & Paste this into the terminal:

ioreg -l | grep cpu-version


Then check the values against this chart I've made for the PPC750 & PPC 74xx CPUs that came after the 7410:

PPC 750 G3 8x Multiplier = "cpu-version" = <00088201>
PPC 750L G3 10x Multiplier = "cpu-version" = <00088300>
PPC 7440/7441/7450/7451 = "cpu-version" = <80000201>
PPC 7445/7455 = "cpu-version" = <80010303>
PPC 7447/7447A/7457 = "cpu-version" = <80020101>

If you run that command on a Mac with an original G4 (7400 or 7410; i.e. the PB G4 15" 500MHz or the Sawtooth/DA 500/533MHz G4) or a 750CX-FX (i.e. any iBook over 400MHz & any iMac G3 over 500MHz) please post your value & Mac. That would help me to complete the table ;-).

Also you could overclock some Macs using software. For a while you could overclock PPC 750FX based iBooks (any White iBook with a G3 CPU & 512KB Cache) using Apple's CHUID Tools but Apple removed that ability after it was being used for overclocking. Powerlogix's CPU director may also work on those models. It works on PPC 750FX models because they support setting the clock speed on the fly. The 7447 & 7457 series support this I believe but I don't think it has been implemented in software by Powerlogix yet & Apple may have disabled that feature on the PB G4.

If you really want to overclock it go to Motorola's Web Site (http://www.motorola.com/ppc) & download the white paper on the 7447 & see how you configure the Bus Speed Multiplier PLL pins. Then crack open the PB & change the pins. If you screw up then you're going to have a 2K paperweight. Enjoy.

idkew
Apr 25, 2004, 08:02 PM
I still don't understand the reasons, but in my research I found there are those out there doing quite well.
...
I just wish someone would take the time to explain what overclocking is and what benefits if any are achieved.

overclocking is just as it sounds. you are raising the CLOCK speed of your cpu to OVER the original spec. some chips/systems can be overclocked and never have a problem, other times it will reduce the life of the chip, and still other times you may fry your chip.

when you overclock, since you are raising the frequency (speed) of your chip, you will (basically) have a faster system. it also sometimes changes the frequency of your system bus. this is not always 100% the case, but why would you overclock your chip, only to lower your bus speed... and have a slower machine?

since an overclocked system will run hotter, most people who do this as a permanent change, will add more cooling for the chip. in a laptop this is not possible inside the case usually, and you run a greater risk of system failure.

some chips can be overclocked by changing the firmware of the machine, other by changing some user moveable jumpers, and still others by changing soldered jumpers. these jumpers control the multipliers used by the system to determine the frequency of the cpu and system bus.

i overclocked my b&w g3/450 to 550+? (not sure) by moving a jumper. i added a fan on top the heat sync, (to be safe) and it worked fine.

Bhennies
Apr 25, 2004, 09:19 PM
That's because people have been xbenching their laptops with the energy saver set to default. Someone set their energy saver to default on a 12 inch 1.33 and got 100. Then they set it to highest performance and got 128. Big difference.I'm pretty sure they set it up properly on barefeats. I would hope? :confused:

spaceballl
Apr 26, 2004, 02:06 AM
Ya know,

I'm a mac user for sure. 100% converted. That being said, I came from the PC enthusiast side of things. I have watercooled computers to overclock them as fast as possible. I have implemented peltier devices to achieve sub zero temperatures. Whenever I had questions about how to squeeze the most performance out of my PC, people would help me out.

On a mac forum, people criticize the man for even attempting to be completely innovative, for trying to make his brand new, fast PB even faster! I don't get it.

-Kevin

Mav451
Apr 26, 2004, 02:08 AM
Ya know,

I'm a mac user for sure. 100% converted. That being said, I came from the PC enthusiast side of things. I have watercooled computers to overclock them as fast as possible. I have implemented peltier devices to achieve sub zero temperatures. Whenever I had questions about how to squeeze the most performance out of my PC, people would help me out.

On a mac forum, people criticize the man for even attempting to be completely innovative, for trying to make his brand new, fast PB even faster! I don't get it.

-Kevin

The irony of "thinking different" :)
It's all about perspective sometimes *_*

ZildjianKX
Apr 26, 2004, 02:39 AM
No, don't overclock your macs, you'll be giving into the MHz myth... that more MHz is a faster computer :p

Bear
Apr 26, 2004, 06:51 AM
wow I just got an idea. For those who understand the G4...is the G4 in the PBook a different size than the ones used in the eMac/iMac? From what I understand in the PC world, mobile versions typically run at a much lower voltage (thus, if you raise the voltage in a mobile version, you can get higher clock speed running the mobile chip in a tower)There have been several PPC chips used in the past couple of years. So depending on which two you are comparing, they may or may not be the same chop, even at the same processor speed.

Also, the current iBooks and Powerbooks both use (probably) 7447A chips. Alhough, they are probably 2 or 3 different versions of the 7447A.

The emAc that was announce coukd be either a 7447 or 7447A. The current generation of Motorola PPC chips deisgned for Laptop use are also reasonable to use in a desktop system.

Bear
Apr 26, 2004, 06:55 AM
The G4s the Powerbooks use are the PPC 7447 which is different from the 7457, which is the desktop counterpart, because of the lack of L3 Cache Circuitry. Because of this the 7447 can't use an L3 Cache but uses less power & creates less heat. Past powerbooks that have had an L3 Cache used the PPC 7455 which was the G4 used in the last Power Mac G4s. The iBook G4 800, 933, & 1GHz (14") used the PPC 7445 which is just like the 7447 in the way that it is missing its L3 cache circuitry. Heres how you find what CPU you have.

...The iMac and the eMac are also probably using 7447 variants since they do not have L3 cache either.

G4 systems without L3 cache and only 256MB of L2 cache were probably 7445 chips. The 7447 (and 7447A) have 512MB of L2 cache.

spaceballl
Apr 26, 2004, 10:15 AM
No, don't overclock your macs, you'll be giving into the MHz myth... that more MHz is a faster computer :p
When you overclock, the mhz myth isn't a myth. The processor stays constant. It's running it at its stock clockspeed or a clockspeed higher than that which it is spec'd for. The overclocked one will always be faster (unless you have to decrease speeds of other components in exchange for a faster CPU speed)

invaLPsion
Apr 26, 2004, 11:07 AM
I'm pretty sure they set it up properly on barefeats. I would hope? :confused:

Who knows. They still haven't tested a 128 VRAM 9700 only a 64...

yamabushi
Apr 26, 2004, 11:20 AM
If you intend to notch up the frequency on a laptop improving cooling can be tricky. I suggest looking into improving the performance of fans or blowers and sacrificing noise and battery life. One or more powerful blowers could do the trick if you can find the space to mount them and the proper voltage to power them.

Some hacks are possible just with software and firmware modifications. Start by disabling all power saving features that affect the cpu. See if you can disable the automatic clock speed reduction feature that is part of the 7447A in the new Powerbooks. You could also look into ways of running the fan or blower at 100% all the time rather than at a variable speed.

If would be a nod to Apple if you would modify your external appearance in some way to indicate that your Powerbook has been modified so those who see it will know that the extra noise isn't normal. Most people would rather preserve their warranty and the reliablity of their system rather than make such risky tradeoffs. However I applaud those who have the guts to try to squeeze a bit of extra power out of their computer as long as they are willing to accept both the positive and negative consequences of their actions.

Also note that maxing out the ram is a simple and effective way to improve overall system perfomance.

ZildjianKX
Apr 26, 2004, 04:44 PM
When you overclock, the mhz myth isn't a myth. The processor stays constant. It's running it at its stock clockspeed or a clockspeed higher than that which it is spec'd for. The overclocked one will always be faster (unless you have to decrease speeds of other components in exchange for a faster CPU speed)

Dude, I was so joking, lol.

Sparky's
Apr 26, 2004, 06:36 PM
idkew, without taking space quoting your whole post, Thanks for the explination, I think I get it now. and agree WHY? when the engineers have done their part should we think we know better.

itsa
Apr 26, 2004, 07:25 PM
The under line request is to Apple.
!!We Mac users want more than 1.5 G4 notebooks!!
And a few of us need them. :0)

Mac_Max
Apr 26, 2004, 09:21 PM
The iMac and the eMac are also probably using 7447 variants since they do not have L3 cache either.

I suspect the very same thing. It would lower costs across the board to buy the very same model of chip for every Mac line.

yamabushi
May 4, 2004, 01:07 AM
... WHY? when the engineers have done their part should we think we know better.

Each user has a different set of needs and wants. For example some people don't mind extra heat and noise in order to get a bit of extra performance while others might just desire maximum battery life. While most of us are happy with the more balanced approach provided in the stock configuration this is not true of everyone. Modifications and the tradeoffs they entail are therefore reasonable in my opinion.

Mord
May 5, 2004, 12:06 PM
No, don't overclock your macs, you'll be giving into the MHz myth... that more MHz is a faster computer :p

when your useing the same prosessor archetecture it is

ciparis
Jun 1, 2004, 07:35 PM
/snip

Heres how you find what CPU you have.

Cut & Paste this into the terminal:

ioreg -l | grep cpu-version


Then check the values against this chart I've made for the PPC750 & PPC 74xx CPUs that came after the 7410:

PPC 750 G3 8x Multiplier = "cpu-version" = <00088201>
PPC 750L G3 10x Multiplier = "cpu-version" = <00088300>
PPC 7440/7441/7450/7451 = "cpu-version" = <80000201>
PPC 7445/7455 = "cpu-version" = <80010303>
PPC 7447/7447A/7457 = "cpu-version" = <80020101>

Hrm. Mine is 80030101. It's the new 1.33 12" powerbook.

re: overclocking, my 500 MHz iBook ran continuously, 24 hours a day, at 600 Mhz since the month I bought it over three years ago until I purchased the new powerbook a few days ago. Overclocking the ibook required great care and surface level soldering using the method publicized at the time on xlr8yourmac, and I made some cooling modifications with copper sheetmetal while I was in there - it ran much cooler afterward than it did out of the box.

Since it was a bus overclock, more than just CPU speed was afected. For example, gaming performance (tested with Qake3Arena and Alice) on that machine was far better, although I did also have to improve the cooling on the old ATI chip before it was happy being pushed that hard. For all appearances, the machine is a 600MHz machine - it operates that flawlessly. Battery life was improved (when I changed the bus speed, I chose a wider gap between high and low speed operation -- it has both a higher top speed and lower bottom speed than stock).

In my case it resulted in a more usable laptop, and since I used it daily, it probably extended my use of the laptop by about a year (my wife's stock 500MHz model was retired well before mine, but when I would use it the machine's lack of speed was annoying enough I probably wouldn't have put up with it).

I'd bump this 1.33 up to 1.5 given the chance, although I'd undoubtably want to open it up and see if the cooling could be improved: this is the hottest-running chip I've ever owned, and as I type it's sitting at 146F/63.5C while doing some lengthy video encoding on my other monitor.