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yossim
May 14, 2009, 02:33 PM
I am a little confused about what piracy is. If I were to check cd's and/or dvd's from the library and sync them to my iPod, would that be considered piracy/copyright infringement? I am on the side that it isn't, since the license agreement in iTunes says that you can put the music on up to 5 computers etc. A friend of mine though, says that it is piracy, and I could get in trouble for ripping cd's and dvd's.

Does anyone know what is piracy and what isn't?



Nermal
May 14, 2009, 02:35 PM
The music that you purchase from iTunes is licensed for five computers in the same household (if I recall correctly). CDs are not covered by the iTunes licence, and it is indeed piracy to make copies of commercial CDs that you don't own.

yossim
May 14, 2009, 02:46 PM
Ok, thank you. It's a good thing I asked before ripping all the cd's at the library!

I have one more question though, is it legal to say, rip an audio book from the library to put on your iPod (to make it easier to listen) and then, once finished (listening to it), delete the audio book?

bartelby
May 14, 2009, 02:47 PM
Ok, thank you. It's a good thing I asked before ripping all the cd's at the library!

Unless you're in Norway, I think...

miles01110
May 14, 2009, 02:49 PM
Ok, thank you. It's a good thing I asked before ripping all the cd's at the library!

Oh come on, as if that's going to stop you.

yossim
May 14, 2009, 02:57 PM
seriously! I'm not going to do something like that if it's wrong, or if I can get in trouble for it. I was at the library yesterday, and I asked the librarian, and she had no idea. So I came here.

bohbot16
May 14, 2009, 04:05 PM
I think ripping a CD from the library is legal as long as you only use the tracks for personal use. It's like using the photocopier at the library.

Ripping a DVD violates the DMCA, since you have to decrypt the DVD to do it.

yossim
May 14, 2009, 04:14 PM
I think ripping a CD from the library is legal as long as you only use the tracks for personal use. It's like using the photocopier at the library.

Ripping a DVD violates the DMCA, since you have to decrypt the DVD to do it.

So, what if you don't have to decrypt the dvd? All the dvd's that I have ripped didn't seem to have encryption. I could be wrong.

gloss
May 14, 2009, 04:15 PM
I have one more question though, is it legal to say, rip an audio book from the library to put on your iPod (to make it easier to listen) and then, once finished (listening to it), delete the audio book?

This is one of those things that's technically illegal but, if you use a little common sense, seems like it should fall under Fair Use. You're not going to get caught or sued for it, so if you have no moral qualms about it (and you shouldn't, because existing Fair Use laws are bollocks) then I wouldn't sweat it.

sbking
May 14, 2009, 04:17 PM
Just rip the CD, it's a retarded law and I don't think anyone is ever sued for ripping a CD.. lol

michael.lauden
May 14, 2009, 04:35 PM
seriously! I'm not going to do something like that if it's wrong, or if I can get in trouble for it. I was at the library yesterday, and I asked the librarian, and she had no idea. So I came here.

haha you asked a librarian?

yossim
May 14, 2009, 04:49 PM
yes, is there something wrong with that?

Heath
May 14, 2009, 04:55 PM
Piracy (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pirate) is a war-like act committed by a non-state actor, especially robbery or criminal violence committed at sea, on a river, or sometimes on shore. (From wikipedia)
Everything you are describing falls under the umbrella of copyright infringement. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Copyright_infringement)

3247
May 14, 2009, 04:56 PM
I am a little confused about what piracy is.According to Article 101 of the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS), which defines “piracy”:

Piracy consists of any of the following acts:

(a) any illegal acts of violence or detention, or any act of depredation, committed for private ends by the crew or the passengers of a private ship or a private aircraft, and directed:

(i) on the high seas, against another ship or aircraft, or against persons or property on board such ship or aircraft;

(ii) against a ship, aircraft, persons or property in a place outside the jurisdiction of any State;

(b) any act of voluntary participation in the operation of a ship or of an aircraft with knowledge of facts making it a pirate ship or aircraft;

(c) any act of inciting or of intentionally facilitating an act described in subparagraph (a) or (b).

yossim
May 14, 2009, 05:03 PM
According to Article 101 of the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS), which defines “piracy”:

Piracy consists of any of the following acts:

(a) any illegal acts of violence or detention, or any act of depredation, committed for private ends by the crew or the passengers of a private ship or a private aircraft, and directed:

(i) on the high seas, against another ship or aircraft, or against persons or property on board such ship or aircraft;

(ii) against a ship, aircraft, persons or property in a place outside the jurisdiction of any State;

(b) any act of voluntary participation in the operation of a ship or of an aircraft with knowledge of facts making it a pirate ship or aircraft;

(c) any act of inciting or of intentionally facilitating an act described in subparagraph (a) or (b).

I mean, "copyright infringement" I figured everyone here would understand what I meant.

Or are you trying to say that there is no clearly defined law regarding copyright infringement?


Maybe they just want to have the option of suing people for the time they run out of really bad guys to sue/press charges against. :p

GimmeSlack12
May 14, 2009, 05:06 PM
I mean, "cyber piracy." I figured everyone here would understand what I meant.

Or are you trying to say that there is no clearly defined law regarding cyber piracy?


Maybe they just want to have the option of suing people for the time they run out of really bad guys to sue/press charges against. :p

I think you make your life more complicated than it has to be. Basically pirating refers to stealing software/media. As for your library, there are certain dues that have been paid and no one will come after you. I mean, seriously, does this sort of act keep you up at night because you think it's pirating? Go download some torrents and then we can talk pirating.

yossim
May 14, 2009, 05:22 PM
I think you make your life more complicated than it has to be. Basically pirating refers to stealing software/media. As for your library, there are certain dues that have been paid and no one will come after you. I mean, seriously, does this sort of act keep you up at night because you think it's pirating? Go download some torrents and then we can talk pirating.

That link to wiki helped a lot. From what I understood from reading the article, it was saying that it was the "Exchange of" was illegal.

The NET Act amends the definition of "commercial advantage or private financial gain" to include the exchange of copies of copyrighted works even if no money changes hands and specifies penalties of up to five years in prison and up to $250,000 in fines. It also creates a threshold for criminal liability even where the infringer neither obtained nor expected to obtain anything of value for the infringement.

iSaygoodbye
May 14, 2009, 05:46 PM
you paid for that stuff.its yours now.rip it to 530854369478 dvds,cds remove the DRM it is yours.do what ever you want

old-wiz
May 14, 2009, 05:58 PM
I think ripping a CD from the library is legal as long as you only use the tracks for personal use. It's like using the photocopier at the library.

Ripping a DVD violates the DMCA, since you have to decrypt the DVD to do it.

Both of these are still piracy as we define it. In the case of the DVD it doesn't matter whether there is encryption or not; you are still making an illegal copy.

Ripping from the CD is still an illegal copy too.

Highly unlikely they will come after you for copying CDs from the library though.

yossim
May 14, 2009, 07:25 PM
Both of these are still piracy as we define it. In the case of the DVD it doesn't matter whether there is encryption or not; you are still making an illegal copy.

Ripping from the CD is still an illegal copy too.

Highly unlikely they will come after you for copying CDs from the library though.

Is the US the only country where this is illegal (ripping from the cd)?

even if I am not exchanging the data it is illegal?

Dr.Pants
May 14, 2009, 08:23 PM
Laws vary from country to country, but if another nation had more flexible copyright laws, then we would know about it. Maybe there are, but I wouldn't choose that as a reason to immigrate :D.

Anyways, here's how I (and some friends of mine) see it - if you own the disc, it is perfectly fine to make a digital copy to back it up. Time Warner guy sees a library of ripped music with the music in the shelves right next to the computer? All I can say is that my hard disc will wear out after the optical media does. Sure, I have Invaders Must Die, a Prodigy album on CD, but to play it on my G5 (if I want to), there is less overhead from a digital copy rather then shoving the CD in the drive. Take Me To The Hospital (The record company?) can take me to court, but their case is slightly flimsy/not worth it considering I bought the CD and still possess it.

All that I am saying is that digital backups of stuff that you own is something that you can do and have no ethical qualms about it. Just don't spam it on the internet or make excessive amounts of copies.

yossim
May 14, 2009, 08:58 PM
Then it would be illegal to rip cd's from the library. right? even if you were not exchanging it, or distributing it?

old-wiz
May 14, 2009, 10:16 PM
In the U.S., you can copy pages from a book with a photocopier as fair use. However, copying the entire book is NOT legal and can result in prosecution. It is still illegal to copy entire CDs or rip entire CDs.

Fair use usually means copy part of it for a quotation, not entire CDs or chapters.

old-wiz
May 14, 2009, 10:18 PM
t.

All that I am saying is that digital backups of stuff that you own is something that you can do and have no ethical qualms about it. Just don't spam it on the internet or make excessive amounts of copies.

If you make a backup copy of your own CD/DVD and do not give it to anyone that is realistically fair use. You are not distributing and they are never going to prosecute you. This is not the same as copying CD/DVD from a library for your own use.

yossim
May 14, 2009, 10:41 PM
So then the next question is, are they going to know if you are copying cd's from the library (even if you don't tell them)?

Dr.Pants
May 14, 2009, 10:50 PM
No. Generally optical media is not over-writable in the forms that you would receive it in. Since no data can be written to an optical disc once it is burned, there is no way to write information - ergo, no footprint. The disc tracks may contain some markers (an audio wave added to the waveform, and then a comparison digitally could subtract the original waveform and find the marker wave), but generally this requires a very intense, speciality program, generally (if at all) found in the production house. However, the file would need to be taken off of your iPod/mac/ w/e, and then processed, then still be on w/e when somebody got a warrant. Want to not care about copyright? Keep a damn big magnet and don't put your HDDs or credit cards near it until the cops bust down the door :D Not speaking from personal experience :D

yossim
May 14, 2009, 11:30 PM
that sounds like a good plan. So now it is up to the individual and his views on "ethical behavior."
just hope to erase all the songs and nothing else when you use the magnet.

I think this discussion pretty well answered my question. Thanks for the posts!

miles01110
May 15, 2009, 12:30 AM
you paid for that stuff.its yours now.rip it to 530854369478 dvds,cds remove the DRM it is yours.do what ever you want

Except the OP is asking about materials checked out of a library.

In the U.S., you can copy pages from a book with a photocopier as fair use. However, copying the entire book is NOT legal and can result in prosecution.

Hah! Google might have something to say about that.

bartelby
May 15, 2009, 12:50 AM
Is the US the only country where this is illegal (ripping from the cd)?

even if I am not exchanging the data it is illegal?



In the uk it is actually against copyright to rip a cd you own to your iPod. But, fortunately, no-one cares about that law, not even the record companies.

Phil A.
May 15, 2009, 05:36 AM
Simplistically, copyright infringement occurs when you make unauthorized use of material covered under copyright. A copyright owner grants you explicit usage rights over any material they own over which they have exerted copyright and any usage beyond that is copyright infringement. IANAL but my understanding is you have no intrinsic rights (except fair use in the US and other areas) so unless you are explicitly told you can do something with a copyrighted work then you can't
So, unless the CD from the library says you are free to make a copy of it if you rented it from the library then you can't do it without committing copyright infringement.

Gretsch
May 15, 2009, 07:46 AM
The CD Copy Police are on the way to your residence right now for merely discussion such a heinous crime! Maybe they can prevent you from becoming a serial ripper...

Ttownbeast
May 15, 2009, 08:16 AM
This has been an issue since the days of recordable magnetic cassette and 8 track tapes. The industry wanted to make it illegal to own cassette recorders and attempted to levy a private tax payable to the record companies on blank cassettes decades back too for the same reasons. For a little while in the 90's the RIAA even tried going after local music stores for reselling used CD's because they weren't getting a cut from those music sales.

Kila
May 15, 2009, 08:34 AM
Piracy will always exist.
There's really no stopping it.
You just have to be smart about it.

gnasher729
May 15, 2009, 10:14 AM
In the uk it is actually against copyright to rip a cd you own to your iPod. But, fortunately, no-one cares about that law, not even the record companies.

And if you are a member of parliament, it is against the law to claim either the CD or the iPod as expenses, but nobody cares about that, especially not the honourable members of parliament.

63dot
May 15, 2009, 10:30 AM
seriously! I'm not going to do something like that if it's wrong, or if I can get in trouble for it. I was at the library yesterday, and I asked the librarian, and she had no idea. So I came here.

I appreciate your honesty. Like many legal issues, the answer is a resounding, "It depends".

When did you want to do this, where, and not only where in the US, but where in the world are key points of law. While something may be piracy in your state today, it could be different this time next year. The music industry seriously tried to stop blank cassettes from hitting the market back in the day, even for people who wanted to copy their own LPs/vinyl.

Landmark rulings in law, in the US in most states, allowed for the public to get their hands on the very useful medium of blank cassettes. While I could have used them to tape class, I never did. The only people I have seen regularly tape class are law students. :)

I copied records for my own personal use but often gave the tape away when tired of it or the band like many teens and young people do. I even gave away all my vinyl (that was stupid). I never went out and sold my homemade tapes though but that never stopped people from making fake inserts and selling them at the local flea market. Cops had better things to do than to worry about this but a few times, kids got busted and it made the news. It was more of a setting of an example as the vendors, usually very young teens and 20-somethings, had a thriving "piracy" business.

yossim
May 15, 2009, 10:41 AM
Except the OP is asking about materials checked out of a library...

I may sound a bit illiterate by saying this, but what does "OP" stand for?

Ttownbeast
May 15, 2009, 10:44 AM
What people do behind closed doors is difficult to enforce--just look at how ineffective sodomy laws in some states are of course some consider that a different kind of "Piracy" LOL there are few if any resources available to Law Enforcement to investigate such matters. So the companies take it upon themselves with their own budgets and investigators to act as the cops, because the cops are busy enforcing laws in the real world and limit the amount of manpower spent to more serious online activity that directly effect the real world like child molestation and bank fraud. Which is why you rarely(if at all) hear about any criminal charges being brought against defendants who copy music the lawsuits brought against individuals are civil suits enforced by the companies.
That FBI warning you see at the beginning of DVD's in my opinion is an ineffective deterrent they are too busy investigating online bank fraud to deal with some 12 year old that ripped a copy of Free Willy he got from Netflix.

themoonisdown09
May 15, 2009, 10:45 AM
I may sound a bit illiterate by saying this, but what does "OP" stand for?

It stands for "Original Post" or "Original Poster". In this case, it means you.

63dot
May 15, 2009, 10:51 AM
I may sound a bit illiterate by saying this, but what does "OP" stand for?

OP refers to you, the master pirateer. It stands for "original pirate". ;)

I suggest you get an eye patch and grow a big black beard. You know, just a suggestion. And also get a parrot to sit on your shoulder.

yossim
May 15, 2009, 12:52 PM
What people do behind closed doors is difficult to enforce--just look at how ineffective sodomy laws in some states are of course some consider that a different kind of "Piracy" LOL there are few if any resources available to Law Enforcement to investigate such matters. So the companies take it upon themselves with their own budgets and investigators to act as the cops, because the cops are busy enforcing laws in the real world and limit the amount of manpower spent to more serious online activity that directly effect the real world like child molestation and bank fraud. Which is why you rarely(if at all) hear about any criminal charges being brought against defendants who copy music the lawsuits brought against individuals are civil suits enforced by the companies.
That FBI warning you see at the beginning of DVD's in my opinion is an ineffective deterrent they are too busy investigating online bank fraud to deal with some 12 year old that ripped a copy of Free Willy he got from Netflix.

So is copyright infringement a "Federal offense?"

63dot
May 15, 2009, 12:58 PM
So is copyright infringement a "Federal offense?"

It can be. I would check inside all large closets right now to make sure the FBI team from Fringe isn't hiding there right now. :)

What really gets the attention of the feds is if you make a lot of copies and start making a lot of money off of another artist without paying them royalties. Napster was right there on the radar screen like a bowling ball.

yossim
May 15, 2009, 01:17 PM
It can be. I would check inside all large closets right now to make sure the FBI team from Fringe isn't hiding there right now. :)

What really gets the attention of the feds is if you make a lot of copies and start making a lot of money off of another artist without paying them royalties. Napster was right there on the radar screen like a bowling ball.


So, unless I'm using Limewire and things like that, then I really don't have anything to worry about... other than people telling me that I'm doing something morally wrong, or things like that... I wonder if copying your own cd's in Britain would be morally wrong... just a thought...

Now, if they prosecute me, I can't claim ignorance, or anything to that effect. :p

Nugget
May 15, 2009, 01:35 PM
Piracy is a war-like act committed by a non-state actor, especially robbery or criminal violence committed at sea, on a river, or sometimes on shore.

Yes, and "piracy" also refers to copyright infringement and has since at least 1771.

63dot
May 15, 2009, 06:14 PM
So, unless I'm using Limewire and things like that, then I really don't have anything to worry about... other than people telling me that I'm doing something morally wrong, or things like that... I wonder if copying your own cd's in Britain would be morally wrong... just a thought...

Now, if they prosecute me, I can't claim ignorance, or anything to that effect. :p

In law school, one of the first concepts we learned about was "deep pockets".

It is not cheap or easy to sue someone. If you buy hot coffee from a local diner in a city of 60 people and spill it on yourself, it's not likely it's worth suing them for your injuries. You may get a few hundred if you are lucky.

But if it's McDonald's, then you know the story.

If you want to get some iPod songs off of library CDs, that's one thing, but if you are Napster, for instance, believe me, the music industry will throw everything they have against you, as they did.

Sure, we are not resolved on the Napster v. Music Industry issue, but Napster is rich and thus a viable, profitable target for the music industry. If you want to spend several hundred thousand in lawyer fees going after a flea market pirate, then go ahead and waste your money. Not much, if anything, will come back to the music industry against them.

But an internationally known entity like Napster is worthy for the music industry to spend the money to go after.

In the old days of lawsuits, especially in torts, the targets were more akin to the biggest targets of that day, railroads, instead of Joe Schmoe down the street. The railroads of the late 19th century and early 20th century were the Microsofts of their time and a deep pocket target with some chance of success in a judgment. Anyway, Google "Palsgraf" to give yourself an idea of why suing was common, but in the context of going after a rich entity where winning could reap great financial rewards.

Ttownbeast
May 15, 2009, 08:23 PM
I guess Pirate Bay just released a statement saying they can't pay and won't pay in light of the recent decision against them and they are appealing. But on the subject of suing the individual these days it is done knowing there are no deep pockets, and it is done to threaten an individuals credit history to set an example so to speak by sending the message that you must comply or we'll ****** up your chances at owning a new home, buying a car, making reservations, getting a good job, etc.. RIAA is fighting a war of attrition against its own consumer base threatening them with the credit system--losing a case you can't pay back puts you in deep debt and gets reported to the 3 agencies in control of those scores that the banks, realities, car dealerships, and potential employers use when conducting background checks.

ipedro
May 16, 2009, 05:21 AM
In Canada it is completely legal to not only rip a CD but to share digital music files. There were cases where the music industry tried to sue individuals and lost in court.

Things are changing though. Our current right wing government is trying to pass laws to make it illegal to share music files.

Now, since Canada is a commonwealth country, and our laws here are based mostly off of Britain's, you may have the same rights in the UK.

This has been an issue since the days of recordable magnetic cassette and 8 track tapes. The industry wanted to make it illegal to own cassette recorders and attempted to levy a private tax payable to the record companies on blank cassettes decades back too for the same reasons. For a little while in the 90's the RIAA even tried going after local music stores for reselling used CD's because they weren't getting a cut from those music sales.

Not only did the music industry try but they actually got it. For years, blank CDs were charged a few pennies extra that went to the music industry to distribute to artists and record companies. iPods also carried this levy until it was challenged in court. Apple eventually refunded $40 or so in Apple gift cards for claimants that could prove they purchased one or more iPods between 2002 and 2005.

yossim
May 17, 2009, 11:10 AM
In Canada it is completely legal to not only rip a CD but to share digital music files. There were cases where the music industry tried to sue individuals and lost in court.

Things are changing though. Our current right wing government is trying to pass laws to make it illegal to share music files.

Now, since Canada is a commonwealth country, and our laws here are based mostly off of Britain's, you may have the same rights in the UK.



Not only did the music industry try but they actually got it. For years, blank CDs were charged a few pennies extra that went to the music industry to distribute to artists and record companies. iPods also carried this levy until it was challenged in court. Apple eventually refunded $40 or so in Apple gift cards for claimants that could prove they purchased one or more iPods between 2002 and 2005.

Another reason to keep all your receipts! :p

alphaod
May 17, 2009, 11:27 AM
I think ripping a CD from the library is legal as long as you only use the tracks for personal use. It's like using the photocopier at the library.

Ripping a DVD violates the DMCA, since you have to decrypt the DVD to do it.

Ripping a DVD for "archival" purposes is not illegal. Distribution is.

Then it would be illegal to rip cd's from the library. right? even if you were not exchanging it, or distributing it?

Actually it really depends; if you rip the CD and then return it, you will need to delete the ripped copy as well since you no longer "own" the original media.

So if ripping dvd's is illegal, then is it legal to watch movies on websites like youku.com or others like it?

No, those sites are illegal, but it's unlikely we have the power to challenge foreign companies.

yossim
May 19, 2009, 04:02 PM
Does anyone know whether it is legal to watch movies on websites like youku.com and the like? I was told by a friend that it is not.

annk
May 20, 2009, 06:25 AM
Unless you're in Norway, I think...

I'm the head of a public library department in Norway, and bartelby's right, if I understand the law here correctly. You can make a copy of a CD for private use here as long as the original you use is a "legal" original. You were in possession of the library's copy legitimately (you borrowed it), and you can therefore make yourself a copy for your own, private use. You can't distribute it, and you can't allow other copies to be made from it.

Here, though, we ask users not to rip our CDs in the library, we ask them to borrow them and take them elsewhere. We don't want to be a copying central for CDs. We want to encourage people to borrow music from us and then to decide themselves whether or not they want to own (= buy) it. But when people ask about ripping, we tell them the truth, that they can rip, but that our rules state that they can't do it in our building. People seem satisfied.

The weird thing is that even though it's also allowed here to photocopy sheet music for study purposes (such as learning a tune at home, not sheet music to be used in a performance), you still aren't allowed to make that photocopy in the library. It's a sort of hiccup in the law that wasn't really meant to be so strict, but turned out that way. :( So you can borrow the music and take it elsewhere to copy it, and that copy is legal. :rolleyes:

But I have no idea what the law says where you live, sorry. :o

HBOC
May 26, 2009, 02:40 PM
i rip my cds onto my MBP. I am not distributing them. I definatelyWILL NOT pay to get albums i have already (and paid $15-$30 each, and i have 400+ cds) from itunes or the like. That is like paying twice for an album, to have one physical and one digital copy.

Even blu-ray movies come with digital copies now, one to play in a player, and one to upload to the computer. would that be piracy, i think nay.

TangoCharlie
May 26, 2009, 03:06 PM
Piracy (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pirate) is a war-like act committed by a non-state actor, especially robbery or criminal violence committed at sea, on a river, or sometimes on shore. (From wikipedia)
Everything you are describing falls under the umbrella of copyright infringement. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Copyright_infringement)

You forgot to mention the parrot, a hook for a hand and a wooden leg!

Airforcekid
May 26, 2009, 11:15 PM
I think ripping a CD from the library is legal as long as you only use the tracks for personal use. It's like using the photocopier at the library.

Ripping a DVD violates the DMCA, since you have to decrypt the DVD to do it.

true and there's no way to get caught doing it just take a look at limewire that's out of control not to mention torrents!

Airforcekid
May 26, 2009, 11:19 PM
Does anyone know whether it is legal to watch movies on websites like youku.com and the like? I was told by a friend that it is not.

It would be like a friend inviting you over to watch a pirated movie you know it is and if there caught your friend goes to jail and you saw a free movie so for you it's legal to share or download no!

CoolKat
May 27, 2009, 02:07 PM
I am a little confused about what piracy is. If I were to check cd's and/or dvd's from the library and sync them to my iPod, would that be considered piracy/copyright infringement? I am on the side that it isn't, since the license agreement in iTunes says that you can put the music on up to 5 computers etc. A friend of mine though, says that it is piracy, and I could get in trouble for ripping cd's and dvd's.

Does anyone know what is piracy and what isn't?

Does it really matter? Afterall if you paid for the music and you in good faith now own it, then you should be able to do whatever the hell you want with it. That means if I pay for a song, I can put on a DVD, CD, USB, Zune, iPod, or whatever computer I want because I own it. This idea that you pay to have a "license" to listen to it is baloney.

If you buy a car, house, or anything else you own it and can do whatever you want with it. It is ridiculous all the DRM they put on forces you to buy and use certain products exclusively. This is apple's biggest fault.

So if you tried in the spirit of fairness to pay for it and "they" in turn try to contain you in a box then I say to hell with their DRM restrictions. Do what you want with it.

old-wiz
May 27, 2009, 02:59 PM
.....This is apple's biggest fault. ....



This is not Apple's choice - it's what the record/movie labels demand. The labels want you to buy the DVD, then buy another version for your iPod Touch, which is of course stupid.

CoolKat
May 27, 2009, 08:54 PM
This is not Apple's choice - it's what the record/movie labels demand. The labels want you to buy the DVD, then buy another version for your iPod Touch, which is of course stupid.

Indeed? It is Apple's choice to follow it strictly and create devices that help further DRM. How come other portable media players are not as restrictive as the ipod? If others can do it so can Apple.

ZMacintosh
May 27, 2009, 08:56 PM
It seems a very abstract yet straight forward thing.
As long as youre not making any money off of your rips its fine?
as long as your distributing them in anyway for profit or not..its fine.

I guess its similar to your OSX license...you get a copy of OSX wether Retail or OEM with your machine....it licensed for a single user/use/computer...you can back it up, clone it, copy it, etc but as long as your not using it to install on othe rmachines or distribute it or copy it onto other systems your fine.

thats just i guess my compare and contrasting opinion. a bit different for software vs cds

I believe though that the regulations regarding it are a bit shortsighted...and there is a vast improvement to be made within the realms of the "music industry"
The RIAA is a joke...the record business barely exists ...they basically lost out when itunes/napster came along and innovated some great technology ( i never used napster..but itunes definitely set a standard)

A lot of people still buy albums...and alot of people listen to radio and alot torrent music...I personally favor buying albums and ripping them to good quality on machine and thats it..i hate most torrent sites as they have junk quality and there is no regulations as far as quality goes.

There could be a good jump in for the RIAA/Recording industry and others to advertise on there, and get payperclicks and payper downloads without a user having to hand over a single penny..but most would if they could get their content cheap and easy...its a mess but im sure someone with a bright idea will come up with something that everyone can enjoy.


What people do behind closed doors is difficult to enforce--just look at how ineffective sodomy laws in some states are of course some consider that a different kind of "Piracy" LOL t

lol what an interesting comparison...but(t) yes piracy is sadistic i suppose :p

old-wiz
May 28, 2009, 08:14 AM
Indeed? It is Apple's choice to follow it strictly and create devices that help further DRM. How come other portable media players are not as restrictive as the ipod? If others can do it so can Apple.

The other portable media players don't have to deal with the iTunes store (read music labels) restrictions. Apple wanted to sell music and make money and the labels demanded the DRM. It's very simple. While you can now buy DRM free, Apple needed to do what the labels wanted in order to get going.