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nbs2
May 2, 2004, 06:25 PM
Ok, i know this has been discussed before, but I just switched (PB15/1.25) and right now I'm not too happy. Running iCal in the background, Safari, iTunes, Mail, and Word - all of which I used to do with my Vaio, I'm hearing my fan run non-stop, burning my legs off, watching the CPU temperature rise - now it's 142.7 - and generally wondering what will happen when I burn a DVD. I mean, is this normal?

Golem
May 2, 2004, 06:42 PM
How much ram? Is their good ventilation what is the external tempature like.

I can run all of that fine sitting at my desk but just web browse while on my laying on my bed and the temperture will go through the roof.

nbs2
May 2, 2004, 06:44 PM
512 MB; about 70 in the house and the two vents on the sides are totally open. i've got a pillow under the computer now - 144.5 and rising is just too hot. thing's making me sweat...

Flowbee
May 2, 2004, 07:05 PM
Your machine should not be running so hot. Period. Definitely not normal. You should give Apple support a call and describe the problem. Or if you're near an Apple store, take it in and show them.

nbs2
May 2, 2004, 07:23 PM
i called apple care. it's like they want to irritate me. apparantly he didn't know what is a "normal" running temperature for people that are running basic software. i should take it up to the apple store. i know that 30 min is relatively close compared to what other people do, but in the middle of finals - bah.

arogge
May 2, 2004, 07:40 PM
i've got a pillow under the computer now - 144.5 and rising is just too hot.

That pillow can make it hotter. Return the PowerBook to a flat surface and check under the keyboard for anything that might be trapping the heat. Are you sure that temperature measurement is accurate? The PowerBook is supposed to fail at 115 degrees F.

nbs2
May 2, 2004, 07:47 PM
That pillow can make it hotter. Return the PowerBook to a flat surface and check under the keyboard for anything that might be trapping the heat. Are you sure that temperature measurement is accurate? The PowerBook is supposed to fail at 115 degrees F.

I realized that a minute ago when it hit 146, so i'm on the coffee table. And while i can't make any guarantee about the temp, i'm using the konfabulator widget and haven't seen any complaints so far. it's down to 143.6. the biggest concern is that the fan seen seems ineffective - it's been running for the last couple hours.

Grimace
May 2, 2004, 08:16 PM
That pillow can make it hotter. Return the PowerBook to a flat surface and check under the keyboard for anything that might be trapping the heat. Are you sure that temperature measurement is accurate? The PowerBook is supposed to fail at 115 degrees F.

The powerbook doesn't fail at 115 degrees on my machine. It is sitting comfortably at 107 right now, and under heavy load gets up in the low 130s.

Where did you see that the powerbook was supposed to fail at 115?

Grimace
May 2, 2004, 09:34 PM
Right now I have Safari and Word open, and my temp is fluctuating between 137-138F. I think there are a couple of sensors inside the powerbooks in different locations. Some programs allow you to see the different temps in the various locations.

arogge
May 2, 2004, 11:38 PM
Where did you see that the powerbook was supposed to fail at 115?

That's from Apple's maximum storage temperature specifications, and my PowerBook does start having problems at 120 degrees F. Programs start crashing and everything slows down. That temperature is the measurement of the air being circulated through the unit by the fans, not of the internal parts. During the summer in rooms without good climate control, I use paper instead of typing on the laptop. The fans make too much noise and the metal gets too hot to touch comfortably.

Grimace
May 2, 2004, 11:46 PM
That's from Apple's maximum storage temperature specifications, and my PowerBook does start having problems at 120 degrees F. Programs start crashing and everything slows down. That temperature is the measurement of the air being circulated through the unit by the fans, not of the internal parts. During the summer in rooms without good climate control, I use paper instead of typing on the laptop. The fans make too much noise and the metal gets too hot to touch comfortably.

If that's the case, then I think the USER would fail at 115 degrees outside temp. Where the heck do you live??? [Tatooine??]

As the saying goes - a cool/cold computer is a happy computer. :cool:

arogge
May 3, 2004, 12:17 AM
If that's the case, then I think the USER would fail at 115 degrees outside temp. Where the heck do you live??? [Tatooine??]


Yes, and it gets really hot on the desert out here. ;) It's not the temperature of the external environment that has been measured. It's the temperature of the air pulled through the computer, which is heated and forced through the back of the unit by the fans. If the incoming air is too warm, there is insufficient heat transfer between the hardware components and the room, and this is what causes the hardware to overheat.

mmmdreg
May 3, 2004, 12:48 AM
My Dell had a problem where the fan was always on then it got too hot and kept shutting down. The dude came and replaced like all the stuff inside.. just go get it checked out..

Celeron
May 3, 2004, 08:40 AM
What performance setting do you have it set to in the power management setup? I know that on my 12'' PB if I'm running on batteries and have it set to "automatic" the fan almost never comes on no matter what I'm doing. Then if I plug it into the power adapter and start running on the "highest" setting, the fan comes on after a while and stays on for quite some time. The PB gets quite warm also.

Try setting it to automatic and see if your situation improves.

jsnuff1
May 3, 2004, 09:08 AM
The current line of proccessors in the PB's have a saftey mechanism built in which will cause them to shutdown at 148 degrees F. The end user experiences this as a 'crash'. The fan starts to kick in at about 140. 115 degrees is considered quite a normal temperature of a PB, if not relativly cool.

Grimace
May 3, 2004, 09:29 AM
The current line of proccessors in the PB's have a saftey mechanism built in which will cause them to shutdown at 148 degrees F. The end user experiences this as a 'crash'. The fan starts to kick in at about 140. 115 degrees is considered quite a normal temperature of a PB, if not relativly cool.

I think the confusion stems from the posts that don't differentiate which temperature is being measured. The above post (which I believe to be correct) - measures processor temp. That is the critical data point.