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virividox
May 11, 2004, 04:47 AM
http://cnn.netscape.cnn.com/news/story.jsp?floc=FF-RTO-reodd&idq=/ff/story/0002%2F20040510%2F0946983616.htm&sc=reodd

im speechless

edesignuk
May 11, 2004, 05:26 AM
I read about this in the paper this morning, absolutely amazing!

Mr. Anderson
May 11, 2004, 08:27 AM
Damn, I could see the broken ribs, but the collapsed lungs? That's just nuts....

D

Juventuz
May 11, 2004, 09:16 AM
That's one tough little kid. Glad to see him make it out ok.

Chip NoVaMac
May 12, 2004, 07:28 AM
Tell you with all the other news we see and hear, this one gives some hope that the world has not all gone to hell in a hand basket....

Danrose1977
May 12, 2004, 09:19 AM
It's incredible what kids can do....

I don't remember this, but when I was a kid my Dad was away a lot (airforce). My Mum has Anemia, but didn't know it at the time.... She used to pass out after going shopping each day, she always woke up an hour or two later and carried on. She always thought that she was putting the shopping away before passing out, one day she came around early and found me putting the shopping away... the fact that I was putting the shopping away made her realise that she was not "just tired" but ill. I was only three at the time, now I'm a primary teacher and I see kids doing incredible things all the time... such as an eight year old who can handle advanced algebra! Worst thing is she has to learn from books as I have trouble at the level she's working! :o

SiliconAddict
May 12, 2004, 11:20 AM
:confused: How do you breath if you have both lungs collapsed?

wdlove
May 12, 2004, 11:44 AM
I think that the mother say it all. He was always a hero in my eyes. He's now just a hero in everyone else's eyes," Tyler's mother told reporters on Monday.

A child is very resilient. In times stress humans can do super human things. The love of a father was paramount over his own life. I pray that Tyler and his father will fully recover. :)

Krizoitz
May 12, 2004, 01:52 PM
Is "hard" a British English term? I've never used it that way here in the states, from the context it seems like it might be similar to "tough".

dopefiend
May 12, 2004, 01:58 PM
Is "hard" a British English term? I've never used it that way here in the states, from the context it seems like it might be similar to "tough".

Nope, its american.

Hard = tough

billyboy
May 12, 2004, 02:09 PM
Is "hard" a British English term? I've never used it that way here in the states, from the context it seems like it might be similar to "tough".

How about, Yes, "hard" as in "hard as nails" in the UK means tough.

I have great fun chatting with my Minnesota belle, we sort of understand what we mean, but sometimes there is a moment, like "What?" I guess saying I was hard would put a sexy smile on her face rather than make her feel I was some sort of tough guy!

Any Brits know what a sconce is, because I didn't. And it took me a couple of goes to explain to her what a "strimmer" is -it's called a weed whacker apparently in her part of America.

virividox
May 12, 2004, 02:45 PM
i think this thread should like with the american english thread

that said kids will always amaze me, whats even more amazing is we were all kids once

Earendil
May 12, 2004, 03:13 PM
Nope, its american.

Hard = tough

Not that America isn't huge...but we don't use that on our half of the US :D
There are really only two ways that I've ever heard it used as a way of describing someone. A very uncommon way is when talking about someones incredibly pumped up or "ripped" muscles, i.e. they have a lot of strength. The other more common way is when talking about, uh, ya know.
For instance, around here if you're a male you would never walk up to a woman and say "I'm hard" if you value your life.

So, what part of the US do they use that in?

Tyler
Earendil

Chip NoVaMac
May 12, 2004, 05:13 PM
Not that America isn't huge...but we don't use that on our half of the US :D
There are really only two ways that I've ever heard it used as a way of describing someone. A very uncommon way is when talking about someones incredibly pumped up or "ripped" muscles, i.e. they have a lot of strength. The other more common way is when talking about, uh, ya know.
For instance, around here if you're a male you would never walk up to a woman and say "I'm hard" if you value your life.

So, what part of the US do they use that in?

Tyler
Earendil

So are soft drinks - pop or soda? <g>

Datazoid
May 12, 2004, 05:45 PM
Not that America isn't huge...but we don't use that on our half of the US :D
There are really only two ways that I've ever heard it used as a way of describing someone. A very uncommon way is when talking about someones incredibly pumped up or "ripped" muscles, i.e. they have a lot of strength. The other more common way is when talking about, uh, ya know.
For instance, around here if you're a male you would never walk up to a woman and say "I'm hard" if you value your life.

So, what part of the US do they use that in?

Tyler
Earendil

To be honest, I was afraid to read this thread due to the title...

Krizoitz
May 12, 2004, 06:17 PM
How about, Yes, "hard" as in "hard as nails" in the UK means tough.

I have great fun chatting with my Minnesota belle, we sort of understand what we mean, but sometimes there is a moment, like "What?" I guess saying I was hard would put a sexy smile on her face rather than make her feel I was some sort of tough guy!

Any Brits know what a sconce is, because I didn't. And it took me a couple of goes to explain to her what a "strimmer" is -it's called a weed whacker apparently in her part of America.

The most common usage of sconce means a bracket for holding a candle or light fixture, do a google search and click on the pictures tab to see some examples.

Krizoitz
May 12, 2004, 06:19 PM
Nope, its american.

Hard = tough

Where in America is this used. I've never heard it out here on the West Coast, and none of my East Coast friends know of it either. Is it a midwest or a southern thing?

Earendil
May 12, 2004, 07:35 PM
Nope, its american.

Not to give you one more reply...
This isn't directly in reply to you, but you make a great example here ;)

People that say any particular thing is "American" bugs me. Being from the NorthWest, WA in particular, I'd like to not be associated, or grouped in with the rest of the "americans" if you don't mind ;)
I'm sure a few other US regions feel the same way :D

Tyler

rainman::|:|
May 12, 2004, 10:32 PM
i've lived in colorado and iowa and i've always heard "hard" referring to a sexual state.

In this case, i would have gone with "tough".

i wondered about it at first too, but once i read the post it was pretty clear in meaning.

paul

hughdogg
May 12, 2004, 11:47 PM
Where in America is this used. I've never heard it out here on the West Coast, and none of my East Coast friends know of it either. Is it a midwest or a southern thing?

I think it is a generational thing...original poster is 19ish, and "dopefiend" is our new Daniel Webster. My sense is that if you think a 95 Honda Civic is a classic hot rod, you'd know what "hard" translates to be, while those of us who remember Honda's as what people purchased when gasoline prices broke $.50/gallon in the 70's...no clue!

My translation, "hard" is a shortened version of hardcore, which roughly translates to tough, so the kid is tough. Which he is, and I'm glad he and his Dad appear to be OK.

Cheers,
hughdogg :)

Earendil
May 12, 2004, 11:49 PM
So are soft drinks - pop or soda? <g>

in my isolated part of the state (no cable/DSL option!) Both are used equally. In short travels around the US, I've found that Soda is a more acceptable word for it. In my travels outside the US they don't use either ;)

Tyler
Earendil

Earendil
May 13, 2004, 01:48 AM
I think it is a generational thing...original poster is 19ish, and "dopefiend" is our new Daniel Webster. My sense is that if you think a 95 Honda Civic is a classic hot rod, you'd know what "hard" translates to be, while those of us who remember Honda's as what people purchased when gasoline prices broke $.50/gallon in the 70's...no clue!

My translation, "hard" is a shortened version of hardcore, which roughly translates to tough, so the kid is tough. Which he is, and I'm glad he and his Dad appear to be OK.

Cheers,
hughdogg :)

I'm not Exactly sure what you just said (sorry ;)) but if you are saying that the younger generation thinks it means "tough" you are a bit off as far as this area. I happen to be the exact age you list (19 y.o.) and my opinion on the word is written above. My girlfriend agrees with the use of the word in this area.

Suffice to say, if you come to the NW, and walk up to me and tell me "I'm hard", I will probably look down, look back up at you, and tell you to get the @#$% out of my face and go find someone else to pester with your 4th grade antics :D

Tyler
Earendil

dopefiend
May 13, 2004, 02:11 AM
Southern guy here, just fyi to whomever is wondering.


i've lived in colorado and iowa and i've always heard "hard" referring to a sexual state.

I actually asked my current girl what it meant to here. Damn you perverted folks :p

Now someone pass me a coke..... :D

takao
May 13, 2004, 04:29 AM
thread going way off topic...

for me as a not-native english speaker ...it was clear that the hard refered to 'tough' (perhaps because the word 'hard' is similiar to the german 'hart' which gets used in the same way as 'though')

thanks to your discussion i guess i will avoid that word when speaking english ;)

wdlove
May 13, 2004, 11:48 AM
Southern guy here, just fyi to whomever is wondering.




I actually asked my current girl what it meant to here. Damn you perverted folks :p

Now someone pass me a coke..... :D

It seems that words have different connotations or meanings according to where you live.

I don't know that I would ever use the phrase, "I'm hard" to anyone. Don't really remember hearing the word used that way growing up either.

Another one that ti found is rubber bands, here in New England the word elastics is used.

When it came to Coke often used it interchangeably for Pepsi. Just whatever the restaurant carried.

Earendil
May 13, 2004, 01:48 PM
It seems that words have different connotations or meanings according to where you live.

I don't know that I would ever use the phrase, "I'm hard" to anyone. Don't really remember hearing the word used that way growing up either.

Another one that ti found is rubber bands, here in New England the word elastics is used.

When it came to Coke often used it interchangeably for Pepsi. Just whatever the restaurant carried.

Funny you should mention that. When I go into a place to order a drink, I always order a "sprite-7up-whatever" :D
If I ever order a specific drink they never have it, it's always "would this be ok instead?"

Yeah, sorry for the off topicness (I'm sure that's a word...someplace...) of the recent posts. But I don't think in this particular case we are distracting from anyone wanting to discuss the original subject. If I'm wrong please slap me around and tell me to go away :)

so how for that think hard means tough, did we ever find out where they are from and how old they are? Or did they vanish? It would be interesting to know...

Tyler
Earendil

rainman::|:|
May 13, 2004, 04:50 PM
Funny you should mention that. When I go into a place to order a drink, I always order a "sprite-7up-whatever" :D
If I ever order a specific drink they never have it, it's always "would this be ok instead?"

Interesting... I too order drinks like this, mine is "coke-pepsi-whatever". They used to just substitute if they didn't have coke or pepsi, but now they argue about it. My favorite was, this asian guy that worked at the mcdonalds-on-a-bridge in chicago (or wherever) would say "pepsi is fine" whenever you ordered a coke, and just went right on talking. Way to be assertive :)

paul

OnlyShawn
Jun 1, 2004, 07:07 PM
funny...i registered completely to reply to this thread.

i'm from the south of the states...well, sort of. geographically, you can't get much more south, but culturally, we're quite northern.

florida, if you hadn't guessed. and, 'hard' made total sense to me...i completely knew what y'all were talking about. i think that it's more of a hip-hop/rap culture thing.....but, i would definately agree that it's a shortened form of hardcore, if i had to guess its etymology. but, if you listen to rap at all (which is obvious that that is not the case...i would be willing to guess that in genearal, mac buyers would listen to noticably lower percentages than the average public of rap), this would be a quite common word....i found it quite striking that it was so foreign to y'all.

and....down here, freaking everything is coke (i grew up up north, in new york/pennsylvania, so it took a bit of getting used to...that along with a 'crick' now being a 'creek'...strange)....you say "i want a coke" and the response is "what kind?"

and...that is SO funny that someone would call a chick from minnesota a 'belle'. absolutely hilarious. but, then, isn't that how it worked in 'love actually'? don't y'all think that all the hot girls are in the midwest? hilarious.

OnlyShawn
Jun 1, 2004, 07:15 PM
ooo...but, i did have a newcastle tonight, so....taht should make me cool to y'all across the pond, no?

Optogirl
Jun 2, 2004, 05:44 AM
In short travels around the US, I've found that Soda is a more acceptable word for it. In my travels outside the US they don't use either

The word 'Pop' is certainly used in Northern England for a "soft-drink" :)

bella
Jun 2, 2004, 08:28 AM
I looked at it as hard = hard core, tough, giving it his all

jamdr
Jun 2, 2004, 11:32 AM
'hard' made total sense to me...i completely knew what y'all were talking about. i think that it's more of a hip-hop/rap culture thing.....

Heh, heh. Yeah, this thread is funny. I agree with this guy--if you have any exposure to rap culture, you'd know what this word meant. I'm from norcal and hear it all the time. As for it coming from hardcore, who knows? I think the definition of hard by itself means pretty much the same thing it does in this context.