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View Full Version : Is it possible to do this in Logic Studio? - Bladerunner sound video




kdum8
Jun 11, 2009, 10:49 PM
see here:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fne0oIEv-WI

I have about exhausted garageband and am looking into buying Logic Studio as an upgrade to further progress. However I don't know much about its capabilities really. Sure I have read the intro on Apple's homepage but it doesn't give that much.

This guy is using a Yamaha CS70M to produce this sound. Does Logic enable one to reproduce similar type effects?



myca
Jun 12, 2009, 09:27 PM
see here:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fne0oIEv-WI

I have about exhausted garageband and am looking into buying Logic Studio as an upgrade to further progress. However I don't know much about its capabilities really. Sure I have read the intro on Apple's homepage but it doesn't give that much.

This guy is using a Yamaha CS70M to produce this sound. Does Logic enable one to reproduce similar type effects?

You could do that in Garage Band if you grab a decent AU virtual instrument or 2, there's plenty of freebies, and some fantastic one's that'll cost ya.

But logic includes enough VIs for starters, so something in there should do the job, ES1 or ES2.

Try checking out

http://www.bigbluelounge.com/
and
http://www.kvraudio.com/

They'll have planty of info on just about everything Plug in and OSX audio wise.

kdum8
Jun 14, 2009, 02:20 AM
You could do that in Garage Band if you grab a decent AU virtual instrument or 2, there's plenty of freebies, and some fantastic one's that'll cost ya.

But logic includes enough VIs for starters, so something in there should do the job, ES1 or ES2.

Try checking out

http://www.bigbluelounge.com/
and
http://www.kvraudio.com/

They'll have planty of info on just about everything Plug in and OSX audio wise.

Thanks for your reply. I am not sure what ES1 or ES2 or AU virtual instruments are, but I will read up on those two links you have given me. A good place to start. Cheers.

myca
Jun 14, 2009, 07:39 AM
Thanks for your reply. I am not sure what ES1 or ES2 or AU virtual instruments are, but I will read up on those two links you have given me. A good place to start. Cheers.

Well a quick heads up.

The ES1 and ES2 are a pair of virtual synths that are included (amongst a host of others) with Logic Pro.

AU virtual Instruments are just that, virtual instruments, with the AU standing for Audio Units (the type of Plug in used in GarageBand, and Logic Pro).

If you can find yourseld a good Virtual Instrument for your needs (there may be some decent Freebies out there), you just load it up in Garageband and tweak away to your hearts content.

Theres tons out there, ranging from Drum machines, to virtual versions of classic analog gear, to faithfull reproductions of Steinberg Pianos and just about everything in between.

Hope you find something suitable :)

ChrisA
Jun 14, 2009, 11:24 AM
.... I don't know much about its capabilities really. Sure I have read the intro on Apple's homepage but it doesn't give that much.

You can download the entire User Manual from Apple's support site. All 1000+ pages of it are available and it's well written. I doubt anyone would read it cover to cover but if you want to know for sure (without trusting the correctness of someone here) you could look it up in the UM. I do this with most of the stuff I buy, I read the manual first. Many times I'll pass on the product when I see that the advertising words to not match the details in the UM.

You can compare Logic and Logic Express this way. Compare both UM and see is you can live with Express' feature set.

Now a direct answer.... Logic Express comes with several software synths. But to get that exact sound requires some skill on the part of the user. Analog syths have lots of controls and how you set them can make the synth sound like a bell or a flute. Many times there are presets but if you want a new unique sound then you need to "design" it yourself. To do that you are going to have to learn about Atack Curves and 50 other things. Can you sound like you want with this?? I don't know. If I buy a Fender Stratocaster can I sound like Eric Clapton? Likely not (And I'm actually buying one today.)

Cycom
Jun 16, 2009, 07:25 PM
The Yamaha CS-70 (to say nothing of the CS-80) is a discreet, analog polysynth. Logic has softsynths that, while sounding amazing in their own right, will never (and this goes for ANY softsynth) get the analog sound 100% right. You can get somewhat close at times, but forget it for completely accurate emulations. Softsynths are the kings of digital, though.

tweekskratch
Jun 17, 2009, 07:17 PM
I would honestly use Ableton Live for this.

Cycom
Jun 17, 2009, 08:26 PM
I would honestly use Ableton Live for this.

There is no reason to use Live over Logic for sound creation. Logic has far superior (bundled) software synthesizers.

tweekskratch
Jun 17, 2009, 09:11 PM
There is no reason to use Live over Logic for sound creation. Logic has far superior (bundled) software synthesizers.


just my personal preference.

myca
Jun 21, 2009, 04:01 AM
The Yamaha CS-70 (to say nothing of the CS-80) is a discreet, analog polysynth. Logic has softsynths that, while sounding amazing in their own right, will never (and this goes for ANY softsynth) get the analog sound 100% right. You can get somewhat close at times, but forget it for completely accurate emulations. Softsynths are the kings of digital, though.

Well that's about true of any soft synth, but soft synths are more convenient, cheaper, and easily available. There are some good analog sounding soft synths out there, there's a really nice 303 clone, and the fantastic Moog one, granted they'll never have the same feel and warmth, but unless you've got money to burn some of the older analog gear is out of most peoples reach :(

Saying that I have a friend who buys and repairs old synths and he sees some amazing gear, which is then sold on at a hefty price, but having the chance to play with them on occasion is a pleasure. :cool: