PDA

View Full Version : Question on dns servers




milk242
Jun 13, 2009, 02:04 AM
Hi everyone,

I'm fairly bored and since lost my job I wanted to learn about domain name servers.

So from I understand, when you register a domain name you must provide it with two domain name servers so those domain name servers can point your domain name to an ip address of a machine hosting your website.

So if you build your own DNS, how do you get a domain name assigned to that such as ns1.domainnameserver.com so you can provide your registered domain name that DNS?

Am I understaind DNS correctly?



Billy Boo Bob
Jun 16, 2009, 09:36 PM
There are some registrars (like GoDaddy.com and many others) that will run your DNS for you if you want. You will still want to know some of the terminology, but most have wizards that walk you through it. That way you don't have to worry about running a DNS server yourself.

assembled
Jun 17, 2009, 04:30 AM
Hi everyone,

I'm fairly bored and since lost my job I wanted to learn about domain name servers.

excellent ambition, get "DNS and BIND" its a fabulous book


So from I understand, when you register a domain name you must provide it with two domain name servers so those domain name servers can point your domain name to an ip address of a machine hosting your website.

Not quite right, its needs to be registered on at least one DNS server to enable people to resolve it.


So if you build your own DNS, how do you get a domain name assigned to that such as ns1.domainnameserver.com so you can provide your registered domain name that DNS?

by all means host a DNS caching server yourself, but don't try and host your own domain on your own servers, at least until you understood the cricket book.

Azgar
Jun 17, 2009, 09:20 AM
So if you build your own DNS, how do you get a domain name assigned to that such as ns1.domainnameserver.com so you can provide your registered domain name that DNS?

If I understand the question properly, you want to know how to get the actual DNS server registered. Some registrars have this ability built into their account management control panels. If they don't, you generally need to submit a support ticket or whatever and simply ask them to register ns1.yourdomain.com as a name server pointing to xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx IP address. As far as I know, you need to do this through whatever registrar you have yourdomain.com registered at.

For example, look at GoDaddy's support page on the topic: http://help.godaddy.com/article/668

belvdr
Jun 18, 2009, 07:36 AM
If I understand the question properly, you want to know how to get the actual DNS server registered. Some registrars have this ability built into their account management control panels. If they don't, you generally need to submit a support ticket or whatever and simply ask them to register ns1.yourdomain.com as a name server pointing to xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx IP address. As far as I know, you need to do this through whatever registrar you have yourdomain.com registered at.

For example, look at GoDaddy's support page on the topic: http://help.godaddy.com/article/668

When someone browses for your domain, it points them to the IP of the DNS server in question, not the name. The name is there for humans, not the computers.

Azgar
Jun 18, 2009, 01:32 PM
When someone browses for your domain, it points them to the IP of the DNS server in question, not the name. The name is there for humans, not the computers.

Hopefully, that much is already common knowledge to anyone even considering running their own name servers. If not, I'd suggest seriously reconsidering. ;)

belvdr
Jun 18, 2009, 02:11 PM
Hopefully, that much is already common knowledge to anyone even considering running their own name servers. If not, I'd suggest seriously reconsidering. ;)

Hey, everyone has to start somewhere, and it reference's the OP's question.

milk242
Jun 18, 2009, 08:01 PM
My question was basically since you have your DNS with an ip address, what provides the name such as ns1.mydomain.com. It would have to be another DNS right? It would seem like an endless loop... what would provide the name resolution for those DNS ip's.

But now I figured out that you could just register the ip address of your DNS on godaddy and it'll provide the name for it.