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View Full Version : Aren't these old servers useless?


waloshin
Jun 24, 2009, 01:49 AM
Yes it may be a dual xeon 3.0ghz , but wouldn't a cheap $500.00 laptop from Walmart be a better server then this thing?

http://cgi.ebay.com/HP-Proliant-DL140-Dual-Xeon-3-0GHz-1GB-80GB-1U-Server_W0QQcmdZViewItemQQ_trkparmsZalgoQ3dSICQ26itsQ3dIQ252BCQ26ituQ3dFICSQ252BUFIQ252BUAQ252BIAQ252 BUCIQ26otnQ3d38Q26poQ3dLVIQ26psQ3d54QQ_trksidZp2773Q2em263QQcategoryZ51215QQitemZ170348311933QQsalen otsupported

djellison
Jun 24, 2009, 02:06 AM
Someone will find it useful. More than enough power for simple hosting / email server etc.

localoid
Jun 24, 2009, 02:22 AM
Yes it may be a dual xeon 3.0ghz , but wouldn't a cheap $500.00 laptop from Walmart be a better server then this thing?


A $500 notebook would be ok for casual use at home. But not ok for commercial use at a real data center if 100% uptime 24/7 365 is a priority.

SkyBell
Jun 24, 2009, 02:41 AM
Wirelessly posted (Mozilla/5.0 (iPod; U; CPU iPhone OS 3_0 like Mac OS X; en-us) AppleWebKit/528.18 (KHTML, like Gecko) Version/4.0 Mobile/7A341 Safari/528.16)

Yes it may be a dual xeon 3.0ghz , but wouldn't a cheap $500.00 laptop from Walmart be a better server then this thing?

http://cgi.ebay.com/HP-Proliant-DL140-Dual-Xeon-3-0GHz-1GB-80GB-1U-Server_W0QQcmdZViewItemQQ_trkparmsZalgoQ3dSICQ26itsQ3dIQ252BCQ26ituQ3dFICSQ252BUFIQ252BUAQ252BIAQ252 BUCIQ26otnQ3d38Q26poQ3dLVIQ26psQ3d54QQ_trksidZp2773Q2em263QQcategoryZ51215QQitemZ170348311933QQsalen otsupported

How so?

7seven7
Jun 24, 2009, 04:23 AM
The server has a 3.5" hard drive, that would be enough for me to choose it over a laptop.

vineetaprakash
Jun 24, 2009, 04:27 AM
thank you for my india

edesignuk
Jun 24, 2009, 04:30 AM
There's a big difference between a proper server and a laptop.

Kind of surprised this needs to be pointed out to anyone :rolleyes:

waloshin
Jun 24, 2009, 11:05 AM
Wirelessly posted (Mozilla/5.0 (iPod; U; CPU iPhone OS 3_0 like Mac OS X; en-us) AppleWebKit/528.18 (KHTML, like Gecko) Version/4.0 Mobile/7A341 Safari/528.16)



How so?

Well I would think that a new c2d laptop or even c2s would have more processing power and faster ram.

waloshin
Jun 24, 2009, 12:06 PM
Well I would think that a new c2d laptop or even c2s would have more processing power and faster ram.

Such as a Macbook running at 2.4ghz 1066mhz , 3 mb of cache. Ram: 1066 mhz ddr3

Vs the Xeon in that server,

Gallatin socket 604, 3.2ghz 1 mb cache, 533mhz fsb. X2
Ram ddr 266 mhz

dmmcintyre3
Jun 24, 2009, 01:11 PM
Is it the Pentium 4 based xeon? If so I would not buy it at all.

mbpnewbie
Jun 24, 2009, 01:16 PM
...but its only $100

localoid
Jun 24, 2009, 01:43 PM
Well I would think that a new c2d laptop or even c2s would have more processing power and faster ram.

What good is "faster" if the laptop has gone into thermal shutdown due to overheating? And anything with intensive I/O demands, such as a large MySQL database, would chew up and spit out the laptop's 2.5" drive in no time. Yes, you can buy industrial-strength "enterprise" 2.5" drives but you won't find them in a $500 laptop.

Besides... the laptop wouldn't fit securely in a standard 19" rack (http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/server-part-1,775.html) which is desirable for many reasons, including easy maintenance (http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/server-part-1,775-13.html). :p

Again, a laptop "server" would be fine for casual use at home "serving" something like iTunes, but no one in their right mind would even consider using consumer laptops in a commercial data center as 24/7/365 servers for paying customers.

Schtumple
Jun 24, 2009, 01:47 PM
Seriously?? It's the utter wrong tool for the job.

That's like saying I want to make a music server, so I bought an iPod shuffle.

waloshin
Jun 24, 2009, 04:53 PM
Is it the Pentium 4 based xeon? If so I would not buy it at all.

Well it is a Gallatin so i am not sure. And if it is pentium 4 based then it would be pretty much like running a Pentium D @ 3.3ghz, right?

To anybody else, what about a Intel core 2 duo desktop vs that server?

steve2112
Jun 24, 2009, 05:11 PM
Like Schtumple and localoid said, it all depends on what you want to do with it. If you only use it for a file server, for example, the processor doesn't really matter. You need a fast drive and network connection for that. And if you are doing something with intensive demands, even a standard desktop will have problems. For most home users who don't have a rack, though, a desktop would be better. Or buy something like the HP Home Server.

But it is only $100. Spend a few bucks for a bigger drive, and you would have a pretty good file server.

RedTomato
Jun 24, 2009, 06:01 PM
That's a lovely little server. Reliable and indefatigable and rackmountable. We have something at work not a whole lot more powerful running Windows Server 2008 and looking after 30 staff.

It all depends on what you use them for. Ours doesn't run Exchange or a SQL database or any public websites. Just does Active Directory (controls network security and logons) and looks after a few gigabytes of user files and desktops and a few other things.

I even considered using an ibook laptop as a server at another organisation which is rather short of space. Really, it'd only be a small file repository and we got a Time Machine to do that instead.

It's when you start running Exchange for more than several dozen people and hosting high demand websites and heavily used databases that you need to start ramping up the power.

localoid
Jun 24, 2009, 06:57 PM
... It's when you start running Exchange for more than several dozen people and hosting high demand websites and heavily used databases that you need to start ramping up the power.

Used as Web servers, an old dual P4 Xeon server should be good for at least 1-million page views annually, even with a good number of medium-sized MySQL databases in use. At least that's about what I was getting out of them back just a few short years ago with they were new.

RedTomato
Jun 24, 2009, 07:37 PM
Used as Web servers, an old dual P4 Xeon server should be good for at least 1-million page views annually, even with a good number of medium-sized MySQL databases in use. At least that's about what I was getting out of them back just a few short years ago with they were new.

Yeah you're right. People don't realise just how powerful modern computers are for anything except a very few apps (3d gameplaying, HD video editing etc)

1,000,000 pageviews/year works out to about 150 pages per hour, which is only about 3 a minute on average. Even allowing for peaks of 15 pages a minute, that's still easily done by a dual xeon. Watching a single Blu-ray dvd probably involves more data shifting and processing than your million pages took.