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bruleke
Jun 26, 2009, 12:04 PM
I bought myself a "my passport for mac 320gb".
Holy Hell, if I am buying it, its because I want to exchange files. But it doesnt work on pc's!

I read in some websites that it really doesnt work on pc's.

So, I can just exchange files between mac computers but not windows computers?
Or there is a solution?

Thanks.



iShater
Jun 26, 2009, 12:05 PM
Do a forum search on "sharing harddrives" or "sharing files", there a lot of suggestions regarding it. Basically the filesystem on OSX is not readable by Windows. There are ways to share.

MacDawg
Jun 26, 2009, 12:06 PM
Reformat the drive

MR Guide: File Systems (http://guides.macrumors.com/File_systems)

File Systems

HFS+
This is the principal file system of Mac OS X. It is a journalled, relatively modern file system that supports POSIX permissions, and features at least limited automatic defragmenting of files. Mac OS X is capable of mounting these volumes for reading and writing, and has full capabilities to utilize them. Mac OS X systems can also only boot from hard disks formatted in this system (as well as bootable optical media). Windows has no native support for this format, but third party tools such as MacDrive allow for limited read/write support on Windows systems.

NTFS
This is the current preferred file system of Windows (beginning predominance circa Windows NT 4.0 and Windows 2000, and including Windows XP). Most Windows systems use principle partitions with this file system. This is a journalled file system with good support for large files. It should be noted that it does NOT support POSIX permissions or ownership. Mac OS X has read only support for this format. It has no capabilities to write to an NTFS drive. Windows has complete read/write capabilities for this format.

FAT32
FAT32 is a legacy file system in the Windows world. However, it is still widely used as almost all Flash-based drives use this format. Mac OS X supports this format for both reading and writing, as does Windows. It has notable limitations, including difficulties with files of size larger than 4 GB. Also, as with NTFS, this file system does not support POSIX and permission / ownership errors could arise when files are moved back and forth between this file system and a POSIX-compliant file system.

ext2
Ext2 is a relatively modern filesystem that is used primarily in Linux environments. It features many of the same creature comforts as OS X, including a journal and the ability to use large files (e.g. bigger than the 4 GB limit in FAT32). This file system is not natively supported in either OS X or Windows, but free extensions are available for both operating systems that allow basically full read/write utilization of this filesystem on both OS X and Windows. The Mac OS implementation is available at Sourceforge; the Windows implementation is available here.

Comparison
Another important distinction that should be noted is that all of the above is based on disks mounted under the given operating system. Limitations can be bypassed by serving a disk from a server for which the format is native. For instance, a Windows client that is accessing a served HFS+ disk that is served from a Mac OS X computer (a "shared" disk across the network) can write to that disk if the server has granted permission. Likewise, while a Mac OS computer cannot write to an NTFS volume it mounts itself, it can write to an NTFS volume being served by a Windows computer.

One important question that gets asked frequently at MacRumors is: how should I format my external device? Here are some suggestions, based on the above limitations of each filesystem.

1. If the device will only be used on a Mac OS X computer, use HFS+. This will offer the most complete support for Mac OS X features.

2. If the device will only be used in Windows, use NTFS, for the same rationale.

3. If the device will be mounted on both Windows and Mac computers, and you will not be using very large files (all files <4 GB) use FAT32. Alternatively, if possible, mount the device on a computer on the network which is always turned on, and format it in the native format of that computer. Then use that computer as a server to share that volume with other computers. For this purpose, it may be slightly advantageous to make the server a Mac OS X computer, so that the file system complies with POSIX.

4. If the device is to be mounted on both Windows and OS X computers, and the user has sufficient privileges on all computers with which it will be used to install the EXT2FS extensions discussed above, then finally, EXT2FS may be an excellent solution. Note however that, should this drive be taken to other Windows or OS X computers, it will not work without installation of the extensions.

5. If you are using an Intel Mac, one configuration that is very popular is to create a three partition system. This system consists of boot partitions in HFS+ and NTFS for Mac OS X and Windows, respectively, plus a third partition in FAT32. All documents are then placed on the FAT32 partition, where they are accessible to both operating systems. While this does have limitations, based on the limitations of FAT32, it may be a good compromise solution for many users.

6. Current iPods come formatted by default in a format which can be read by both systems (FAT32) and should probably be left this way unless specific needs exist with respect to alternate usage (e.g. as a drive for sharing files). While earlier iPods were formatted in HFS+ and this system confers some advantages in Mac-only environments, this is probably not something you should worry about unless you already know what you are doing. Likewise, Flash drives should NOT be reformatted and should be left in FAT32.

File systems cannot easily be converted from one standard to another, so make your decision carefully. In the event that you must later change systems, you will need to back up all files, reformat the drive (destroying all data on it), and then return the files to the drive. Drives can be formatted with Disk Utility in Mac OS X, and similar system tools in Windows, though Windows cannot format a FAT32 partition above 32GB, as Microsoft want you to use NTFS; this is an artificial restriction. iPods can be reformatted using the iPod Software Updater, available from Apple. Backup utilities are also readily available on both platforms (backup to multiple DVD-R or DVD-RW discs may be necessary if only one external drive is owned).

When Mac OS X writes to a FAT32 drive, it will create additional "dot files" (files beginning with "." are normally hidden in Unix systems) such as .DS_Store. These files allow Mac OS X to compensate somewhat for features of HFS+ that are not available in FAT32. The end result is that most files, including almost all document files, can be transferred back and forth between FAT32 and HFS+ without any real concern over he file system differences.

Woof, Woof - Dawg http://homepage.mac.com/k.j.vinson/pawprint.gif

bruleke
Jun 26, 2009, 12:13 PM
Woof, Woof - Dawg http://homepage.mac.com/k.j.vinson/pawprint.gif

Look, I have already formated my passport for mac using HFS+, NTFS and FAT32 but when I connect it on a Windows Vista notebook, it detects the drive, but the icon doesnt appear. Its like: "There IS a hard drive here... but I will not show you, da da da daaa!"

understand?

I looked up many threads here, but no success.

I saw in another forum that I should use a cable that has 2 USB ends, because Windows requires more power to make the hard drive to work. I thought: "Thats insane... "

Its getting hard to make this piece of **** work :mad:

Jason S.
Jun 26, 2009, 12:19 PM
You can't format a hard drive as all three of those filesystems unless you partitioned the hard drive. And even if you did that, what you store in the partition that is formated as HFS+ will still not be visible to the Windows computer.

I'm not sure if a hard drive that big can be formated as FAT32, but that is the file system that you want to format the drive as to be able to read and write from both Mac OS X and Windows.

The "for Mac" part of the brand is only for marketing purposes really. Any hard drive will work, you have the same Passport as the non-for-Mac version, but its just formatted with HFS+ out of the box.

Look, I have already formated my passport for mac using HFS+, NTFS and FAT32 but when I connect it on a Windows Vista notebook, it detects the drive, but the icon doesnt appear. Its like: "There IS a hard drive here... but I will not show you, da da da daaa!"

understand?

I looked up many threads here, but no success.

I saw in another forum that I should use a cable that has 2 USB ends, because Windows requires more power to make the hard drive to work. I thought: "Thats insane... "

Its getting hard to make this piece of **** work :mad:

MacDawg
Jun 26, 2009, 12:22 PM
Look, I have already formated my passport for mac using HFS+, NTFS and FAT32 but when I connect it on a Windows Vista notebook, it detects the drive, but the icon doesnt appear. Its like: "There IS a hard drive here... but I will not show you, da da da daaa!"

understand?

I looked up many threads here, but no success.

I saw in another forum that I should use a cable that has 2 USB ends, because Windows requires more power to make the hard drive to work. I thought: "Thats insane... "

Its getting hard to make this piece of **** work :mad:

No need to get mad at me... your original post said nothing about reformatting the drive.

If you aren't looking for suggestions, then don't post.

Woof, Woof - Dawg http://homepage.mac.com/k.j.vinson/pawprint.gif

bruleke
Jun 26, 2009, 12:24 PM
You can't format a hard drive as all three of those filesystems unless you partitioned the hard drive. And even if you did that, what you store in the partition that is formated as HFS+ will still not be visible to the Windows computer.

I'm not sure if a hard drive that big can be formated as FAT32, but that is the file system that you want to format the drive as to be able to read and write from both Mac OS X and Windows.

The "for Mac" part of the brand is only for marketing purposes really. Any hard drive will work, you have the same Passport as the non-for-Mac version, but its just formatted with HFS+ out of the box.

Couldnt have a better answer, thanks!

But, tell me: So, I CANT read it on Windows? Or, all I need to do is to create a new partition in FAT32 (using the total size of it)?Because I have already formated in fat32, but didnt create a partition.

Sorry, as my macrumor identity says: newbie.

Thanks anyway!
e

fireshot91
Jun 26, 2009, 12:30 PM
If you format it, there has to be atleast one partition already.

On your Vista computer, go Right Click on My Computer>Manage> (Left Pane) Open the Storage area>Click on Disk Management.

Format your Passport as NTFS.

While it is doing that, go on your Mac.

Download This And "Install" (http://downloads.sourceforge.net/catacombae/NTFS-3G_2009.4.4-catacombae.dmg?use_mirror=)

Then after your format is done, connect your hard drive to your Mac, and transfer your files. Or if you're transferring from Windows to Mac, after your format is done, transfer your files.

bruleke
Jun 26, 2009, 12:30 PM
Hein?
Sorry, I never meant to cause you trouble. Oh, I never meant to do you harm!


No need to get mad at me... your original post said nothing about reformatting the drive.

If you aren't looking for suggestions, then don't post.

Woof, Woof - Dawg http://homepage.mac.com/k.j.vinson/pawprint.gif

crzdmniac
Jun 26, 2009, 12:32 PM
There really is no need to get nasty with the others that are trying to help you. MacDawg's post was very informative. It's as simple as this; format it in FAT32 if you wish to be able to write files in both Windows and OS X. You should probably format it in Disk Utility as "MSDOS (FAT)", otherwise you'll be stuck with a partition size limit of 32GB in Windows.

bruleke
Jun 26, 2009, 12:33 PM
THATs the problem: Windows vista makes that noise (that USB drive is connected) but DOESNT show anything in MY COMPUTER or MANAGE PANEL... nothing!

:mad:

I tried this in 4 vista computers: all of them do the same
:(

so sad...


If you format it, there has to be atleast one partition already.

On your Vista computer, go Right Click on My Computer>Manage> (Left Pane) Open the Storage area>Click on Disk Management.

Format your Passport as NTFS.

While it is doing that, go on your Mac.

Download This And "Install" (http://downloads.sourceforge.net/catacombae/NTFS-3G_2009.4.4-catacombae.dmg?use_mirror=)

Then after your format is done, connect your hard drive to your Mac, and transfer your files. Or if you're transferring from Windows to Mac, after your format is done, transfer your files.

fireshot91
Jun 26, 2009, 12:35 PM
It doesn't show up in Disk Management but it shows up in Disk Utility (Mac)?

bruleke
Jun 26, 2009, 12:35 PM
There really is no need to get nasty with the others that are trying to help you. MacDawg's post was very informative. It's as simple as this; format it in FAT32 if you wish to be able to write files in both Windows and OS X. You should probably format it in Disk Utility as "MSDOS (FAT)", otherwise you'll be stuck with a partition size limit of 32GB in Windows.

Sorry Macdawg, I didnt know I was that stupid with you! Sorry :)

BTW, THIS IS what I do: format in FAT in disk utility, but when I connect in ANY windows vista computer, it makes that USB CONNECTED DEVICE SOUND, but doesnt appear in MY COMPUTER or DEVICES MANAGER

bruleke
Jun 26, 2009, 12:36 PM
It doesn't show up in Disk Management but it shows up in Disk Utility (Mac)?

PERFECT!
You got it!

If you google it: "my passport for mac windows vista" you will see my problem.

But... no answer, wherever site you go... no answer
=/

fireshot91
Jun 26, 2009, 12:38 PM
Are you on a Windows Desktop or laptop?

And if desktop, are you comfortable opening your hard drive enclosure and your computer?

EDIT: Nevermind-


This CNet (http://reviews.cnet.com/external-hard-drives/western-digital-my-passport/4505-3190_7-33033134.html) article says that the OS's compatible are Windows XP, OS X, and Windows Vista, so it should work fine. I have no idea why it is not.

bruleke
Jun 26, 2009, 12:42 PM
Are you on a Windows Desktop or laptop?

And if desktop, are you comfortable opening your hard drive enclosure and your computer?

I have 2 laptops:
macbook Pro
Dell Laptop Windows Vista basic

So, you really understood my problem?
That sucks man... I bought it to share movies and songs with friends at office, but doesnt work on Vista.

getz76
Jun 26, 2009, 12:42 PM
I would bet a dollar that you are not delivering enough power to the drive. Are you using a hub or plugging directly into one of the USB ports on the computer?

bruleke
Jun 26, 2009, 12:44 PM
I would bet a dollar that you are not delivering enough power to the drive. Are you using a hub or plugging directly into one of the USB ports on the computer?

All the users in others forums says that!
I bet the same

BTW, I use directly to the usb port.

They say I have to use those freaking cables that has 2 USB ends to connect through 2 usb ports. So I could have enough power.

But... this sound so stupid...

"There goes that stupid man who need a freak usb cable to use his hard drive... tsc tsc... God bless him"

hahaha

darkpaw
Jun 26, 2009, 12:46 PM
With regards to the 2 USB cables question, some COMPUTERS cannot provide enough power to USB hard drives through one cable. This is not specifically a Windows problem. I had the same issue a couple of years back with a Formac external drive. It looks like your Mac provides enough power which is why it's okay on the Mac but not on the PC.

You need to use a cable with two ends: one for power, one for data. If the drive didn't come with that, you might need to buy one from elsewhere. Alternatively, if the drive has a separate AC power port you can supply power to it through that.

bruleke
Jun 26, 2009, 12:49 PM
With regards to the 2 USB cables question, some COMPUTERS cannot provide enough power to USB hard drives through one cable. This is not specifically a Windows problem. I had the same issue a couple of years back with a Formac external drive. It looks like your Mac provides enough power which is why it's okay on the Mac but not on the PC.

You need to use a cable with two ends: one for power, one for data. If the drive didn't come with that, you might need to buy one from elsewhere. Alternatively, if the drive has a separate AC power port you can supply power to it through that.

This is the best answer. At least I can understand the problem and have a solution.
But... its weird...
Anyway, is there any Hard Drive compatible with MAC and PC? (using ONE usb cable? and which has firewire 800 port also)

man, I want to personally thank you for that help.:)

fireshot91
Jun 26, 2009, 12:52 PM
This is the best answer. At least I can understand the problem and have a solution.
But... its weird...
Anyway, is there any Hard Drive compatible with MAC and PC? (using ONE usb cable? and which has firewire 800 port also)

man, I want to personally thank you for that help.:)

Actually, there are a lot.

I'd be cheaper for you to buy a USB cable with split ends though.

bruleke
Jun 26, 2009, 12:57 PM
Actually, there are a lot.

I'd be cheaper for you to buy a USB cable with split ends though.

How do I look for it on ebay?I tried "split USB" but nothing

Do you think I will have a problem when snow leopard comes? It will read the hard drive anyway, right?

Ruahrc
Jun 26, 2009, 01:00 PM
If the computer is not suplying enough power you'll know because the drive will make repeated clicking noises every few seconds. Also you will not feel the slight vibration of the disk spinning. These are two easy ways to confirm it's power and not configuration.

I have the WD Passport Studio which has USB2 and FW800 and on my old PBG4 it could not deliver enough power to the drive on USB and it would click once every 1-2 seconds forever. That's why I bought the FW800 drive because I connect it on FW and have no power problems.

Power really should not be an issue on most computers, I think my PBG4 was in the minority that it could not power the drive via USB. Desktop computers especially they should have no difficulties powering the drive via USB. Are all the computers you connect laptops?

Ruahrc

lag1090
Jun 26, 2009, 01:01 PM
Doesn't your drive have Firewire 800?

If your PC had it, I'd use that instead of USB.

Just make sure your reformat the drive as FAT32 in Disk Utility, and you should be fine. Otherwise, it's an issue with Windows.

getz76
Jun 26, 2009, 01:04 PM
If the computer is not suplying enough power you'll know because the drive will make repeated clicking noises every few seconds. Also you will not feel the slight vibration of the disk spinning. These are two easy ways to confirm it's power and not configuration.

Not always. I had one drive that would make absolutely no sound at all. The USB was enough to power the chipset on the case drive, but not enough to do anything to the drive itself.

I suggest the OP tries another Windows box, or better yet try the same Mac in BootCamp.

bruleke
Jun 26, 2009, 01:06 PM
If the computer is not suplying enough power you'll know because the drive will make repeated clicking noises every few seconds. Also you will not feel the slight vibration of the disk spinning. These are two easy ways to confirm it's power and not configuration.

I have the WD Passport Studio which has USB2 and FW800 and on my old PBG4 it could not deliver enough power to the drive on USB and it would click once every 1-2 seconds forever. That's why I bought the FW800 drive because I connect it on FW and have no power problems.

Power really should not be an issue on most computers, I think my PBG4 was in the minority that it could not power the drive via USB. Desktop computers especially they should have no difficulties powering the drive via USB. Are all the computers you connect laptops?

Ruahrc

All laptops.

MAC: OK
WINDOWS: makes the "new usb drive connected" balloon and sound but DOESNT appear on MY COMPUTER or drive manager. I tried it on 4 windows laptops.

Conclusion: not enough power, I'd say?

Solution: Special cable or buy another hard drive?

patrixl
Jun 26, 2009, 01:29 PM
Could you post a screenshot of what it looks like, in Disk Utility, on the Partition tab for this hard drive? Maybe this will give an extra clue, perhaps the partition map type isn't compatible with Vista in this case, perhaps.. who knows. If we can see that, and eliminate that possibility of partitions/file system being the cause, then we can with more certainty say it is a power issue.

cmd-shift-4, then click the disk utility window, will create a screenshot file on your desktop that you can attach...


Patrix.

bruleke
Jun 26, 2009, 01:35 PM
Could you post a screenshot of what it looks like, in Disk Utility, on the Partition tab for this hard drive? Maybe this will give an extra clue, perhaps the partition map type isn't compatible with Vista in this case, perhaps.. who knows. If we can see that, and eliminate that possibility of partitions/file system being the cause, then we can with more certainty say it is a power issue.

cmd-shift-4, then click the disk utility window, will create a screenshot file on your desktop that you can attach...


Patrix.

Oh thats a good idea, but unfortunately my old white macbook was sold and I am waiting my brother to return from Portugal. He bought the macbook pro 2.4 there.

When he comes back, can I contact you using private message? I didnt know about that "partition map" at all...

I hope this is a hope :)

kgeier82
Jun 26, 2009, 01:37 PM
Did you change the partition scheme to MBR? It wont read the apple style.

click on options under the partition tab in Disk util.

This is the issue im sure.

bruleke
Jun 26, 2009, 02:00 PM
Did you change the partition scheme to MBR? It wont read the apple style.

click on options under the partition tab in Disk util.

This is the issue im sure.

So, thats it?
I go to the partition map and change it to "MBR"?

then, format to fat32?

Thats it?

I will try it on July 10th (the date I will get my new macbook pro)

lag1090
Jun 26, 2009, 02:02 PM
So, thats it?
I go to the partition map and change it to "MBR"?

then, format to fat32?

Thats it?

I will try it on July 10th (the date I will get my new macbook pro)

Forgot about the partitioning scheme. That should fix the problem.

In the future, do yourself a favor and just buy the regular version.

bruleke
Jun 26, 2009, 02:07 PM
Forgot about the partitioning scheme. That should fix the problem.

In the future, do yourself a favor and just buy the regular version.

sorry, i didnt understand about the partition scheme. Could you detail it?

Yeah yeah ahaha! I wont buy anything made for mac which has the SAME version for PC :P

fireshot91
Jun 26, 2009, 02:09 PM
sorry, i didnt understand about the partition scheme. Could you detail it?



In Disk Utility, click on your hard drive, then go to the Partition tab.

Under either Advanced or Options (I forgot which one, as I'm on a XP right now, I can't check) and choose Master Boot Record (MBR)

bruleke
Jun 26, 2009, 02:10 PM
In Disk Utility, click on your hard drive, then go to the Partition tab.

Under either Advanced or Options (I forgot which one, as I'm on a XP right now, I can't check) and choose Master Boot Record (MBR)

Then, i create a partition AND format or just create a partition?

You guys rock!

lag1090
Jun 26, 2009, 02:11 PM
sorry, i didnt understand about the partition scheme. Could you detail it?

Yeah yeah ahaha! I wont buy anything made for mac which has the SAME version for PC :P

When you're partitioning the drive in Disk Utility, select the number of partitions. Then click the options button near the bottom of the window. Select "Master Book Record" and click ok. Then click apply to repartition the drive.

Then, i create a partition AND format or just create a partition?

You guys rock!

Just partition it.

bruleke
Jun 26, 2009, 02:15 PM
Just partition it.

THANKS!
I will try it!

Thanks thanks thanks! I dont have my macbook pro now but I am already feeling happy... I think that's gonna work!

patrixl
Jun 26, 2009, 04:57 PM
Just a caveat here, I myself have a Seagate Agent To Go (or hwatever) hard drive, 320GB..

and I partitioned it using an Apple GUID partition map, and have 3 partitions on it: 2 HFS and 1 FAT... and my XP computers can still read the FAT partition, even if it's not an MBR partition map.

So it may or may not help, but it's something to try before looking for that power cable.

Ruahrc
Jun 26, 2009, 05:28 PM
When you plug the drive in to the Windows computer does it actually spin up? What about the clicking noises? The power from the USB will power the electronics on the drive, making it appear to Windows, but if you can't supply enough power to actually start the drive motor then it will never show up. I suspect this is what is happening but it's easy to confirm just let us know if the drive is spinning or not?

Ironically there is plenty of power to keep the motor running, but starting the drive is the hardest part. I heard some stories once about people "jumpstarting" the drive either over FW or 2 USBs, then quickly changing the cable to a standard USB cable. If done quickly, the drive will still be spinning when you plug it into the computer, and there will be enough power to start the drive and maintain the rotation. Again, because the actual starting of the drive is only momentary and is what keeps it from working reliably on USB.

Ruahrc