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stubeeef
Jul 1, 2009, 08:04 AM
I am a network n00b

I want to wire my house with a gigabit network (around 10-12 plates in the house)
I am thinking of Cat6 just for the added benefits (I have read that there is not a lot of difference btwn Cat5e and Cat6, but I am not sure how close some runs will come to my homes electric wiring).
I will have my cable modem then an Ooma voip box, then to a time capsule and out to a switch. (does that all sound right?)
I think I need a switch vs a router (am I right)
First question, Which Switch? (looking at netgear prosafe 16port gigabit)
Second question, Is there a good unpowered switch?
Third question, What vendor is recommended? (1000' of cable, rj45 connectors, plates with keystone connectors, and other items someone here tells me I need)
I will have an entire house with gigabit apple computers, and my work issue Dell Laptop.
I will eventually attach a NAS or Media server.
One outlet will be to my Home Theater http://home-and-garden.webshots.com/album/555596824CqbdmN



belvdr
Jul 1, 2009, 08:40 AM
Okay here goes...

1. The router connects your internal network to another network (most likely the Internet).
2. A switch simply connects all internal devices together (no routing).

When wiring, the best idea is to wire the jacks back to a patch panel. This panel presents a row of RJ45 jacks for you to use, and the cable to each wall jack in the house is punched down on the back side. The added benefit of this is you can use the RJ45 jacks for anything you wish (audio, telephone, etc). This makes your system much more modular for future use. We actually use some of the LAN jacks in our office for a stereo system. We simply patched the jacks across so that they do not connect to any networking equipment.

As for vendors, I generally use Linksys, since I have had several NetGears die prematurely; however this was several years ago.

If price isn't an issue, or if you are not sure, I'd go with CAT6 hands down. I have used the modular jacks from Home Depot/Lowes in the past. I had one wall plate with 2 coax, one telephone, and one LAN, with an extra spot to spare. You can order these online at a bigger discount.

For cable, I've used Belkin without issue, but I'm not sure it's going to make a huge difference. If it is designated as CAT6, you shouldn't have any issue.

I do not know of any unpowered switch. There are some very small switches built into the wall jack, but they usually get their power from the other end, which would require a PoE (Power over Ethernet) switch for it to connect to.

You may also research to find a wall jack with 2 female connectors, and order pre-built cables from another company. This would save you tons of time from crimping and punching down the ends, and you can always shorten the cables as well.

stubeeef
Jul 1, 2009, 08:46 AM
So what I need is a switch. Thanks

I guess the switch will connect to the time capsule, correct? and I can access a NAS or Media Server that is plugged into the time capsule via the network via the switch. (this is driving me crazy-I am a stereo nut not a networking nut)
I just want to make sure I have an effective design to access the NAS/Media Server across the wired and wireless portions of the network.

lee1210
Jul 1, 2009, 09:31 AM
belvdr pretty much covered it, but from your reply you seem to take the switch/router question as an either/or. You're likely going to need both, unless you don't want the whole thing hooked up to the internet (you mention a cable modem and voip gateway, so you probably do want it attached to the internet). The router will sit at the "edge" of your network, connected to the cable modem via the "WAN" port and then back to your network via the "LAN" port.

Otherwise, it looks like the cable (just a spool that you'll have to cut and strip) will be ~$300 for cat6, probably $150-200 for the switch and router. A patch plate will probably be $20-40. You do have to decide if you want keystone connectors on the patch plate and each wall plate (then you'll have to crimp the cables and put on the connectors yourself) vs. punching down the twisted pairs yourself. Either is going to require some cable manipulation (stripping, etc. for punching down, crimping for adding your own connectors). The only way around this is premade cables + all keystone connectors, but getting the right lengths, etc. would be very tricky, and likely even more expensive than the 1000' spool.

-Lee

Consultant
Jul 1, 2009, 10:50 AM
google
build home network

steviem
Jul 1, 2009, 10:55 AM
That google term would be useless. Not particularly 'consultant' like.

You can't get 'passive' switches like you used to be able to get passive hubs. I also like Linksys hardware, although I haven't experienced any problems with Netgear.

I would love to cable my own house when I can eventually buy, and Cat 6 would probably be the choice cable. I haven't installed cabling at work, but I have repaired wall jacks in the past and the tool is really simple to use.

Also, everything that belvdr says is right in regard to a patch panel, and it'd probably be a good call to get a small to medium sized rack and maybe a rack mount switch.

It's not rocket science, it's a little daunting at first, but it is pretty simple stuff.

Consultant
Jul 1, 2009, 01:18 PM
That google term would be useless. Not particularly 'consultant' like.

You can't get 'passive' switches like you used to be able to get passive hubs. I also like Linksys hardware, although I haven't experienced any problems with Netgear.

I would love to cable my own house when I can eventually buy, and Cat 6 would probably be the choice cable. I haven't installed cabling at work, but I have repaired wall jacks in the past and the tool is really simple to use.

Also, everything that belvdr says is right in regard to a patch panel, and it'd probably be a good call to get a small to medium sized rack and maybe a rack mount switch.

It's not rocket science, it's a little daunting at first, but it is pretty simple stuff.

Which part of it is useless? The results are relevant, but you are saying articles from these places are useless?

compnetworking.about.com
pcmag.com

Please actually google it before making wildly false claims.

LouisBlack
Jul 1, 2009, 02:40 PM
I reckon that you'll want...

Cable modem----> Router----> Switch----> Devices on network

In your case your router is your Time Capsule. Routers nowadays have built in switches but for what you are proposing you will need many more ethernet ports than the Time Capsule can provide.

Adding a NAS or media server shouldn't be any more work than plugging it into an available port on the switch.

Please someone chime in if any of that is incorrect. I have experience in networking but not really on this scale!

BTW, your home theatre looks amazing.

alexmadison
Jul 1, 2009, 02:45 PM
With a 10 megabit Internet connection you donít need a gigabit router. Your current router will connect to a port on your gigabit switch at 100 megabit. A managed switch is generally overkill for home use. How many switch ports do you need? I would suggest an unmanaged switch from Linksys, Netgear, Dlink, Dell, or Zyxel.

LouisBlack
Jul 1, 2009, 03:04 PM
With a 10 megabit Internet connection you donít need a gigabit router. Your current router will connect to a port on your gigabit switch at 100 megabit. A managed switch is generally overkill for home use. How many switch ports do you need? I would suggest an unmanaged switch from Linksys, Netgear, Dlink, Dell, or Zyxel.

Time Capsule has gigabit ethernet ports.

Although internet connections may not ever tax gigabit connections it is still useful for media streaming around the home and transferring large files.

steviem
Jul 1, 2009, 04:09 PM
Which part of it is useless? The results are relevant, but you are saying articles from these places are useless?

compnetworking.about.com
pcmag.com

Please actually google it before making wildly false claims.

I'm saying you're being pretty unhelpful. Plus it forced you to actually google it yourself after making false claims yourself ;)

stubeeef
Jul 1, 2009, 05:25 PM
Ok,
Thanks for any and all help.
FWIW I did a lot of googling, it is cheaper than hiring a Consultant (sorry couldn't resist)
I have read about solid cable vs stranded, cat5e vs cat 6.
The problem I am having is if I plug the NAS/MediaServer into the time capsule will it be accessible via the network if it is setup as so..

cable modem>Ooma Voip box>timecapsule and from there a server out one port (NAS/or Media) and the 16 port gigabit switch out another port. Then all other home computer and such will access the wired network through the switch. Will they get to the NAS/Media server? I am assuming so, but hate to assume that.
Is there any special software that would be beneficial?
I do appreciate the help (and thanks about my HT-still in work though).
I am still googling but do appreciate specific links that others found helpful.

GimmeSlack12
Jul 1, 2009, 05:28 PM
stubeef, don't mean to be late to the party. But is the wireless option not possible? It is just less messy and less wires (duh).

Might be worth investing in an N-router and N-dongles for all computers. Yeah? Thats all I have to recommend.

stubeeef
Jul 1, 2009, 05:44 PM
I have the house on an apple extreme but we are running at G because of the work laptop.
I will be purchasing a dual band time capsule (or extreme) after wiring the house.
I want to remove the wireless option from time to time (get the kids off the iPods, stream movies to the HomeTheater mini and AppleTV in master bedroom) and have the options available from gigabit ethernet (better speed with multiple simultaneous users).
Wireless will end up in guest mode.

belvdr
Jul 1, 2009, 07:07 PM
Ok,
Thanks for any and all help.
FWIW I did a lot of googling, it is cheaper than hiring a Consultant (sorry couldn't resist)
I have read about solid cable vs stranded, cat5e vs cat 6.
The problem I am having is if I plug the NAS/MediaServer into the time capsule will it be accessible via the network if it is setup as so..

cable modem>Ooma Voip box>timecapsule and from there a server out one port (NAS/or Media) and the 16 port gigabit switch out another port. Then all other home computer and such will access the wired network through the switch. Will they get to the NAS/Media server? I am assuming so, but hate to assume that.
Is there any special software that would be beneficial?
I do appreciate the help (and thanks about my HT-still in work though).
I am still googling but do appreciate specific links that others found helpful.

Here's how I would do it:

Cable modem -> Router -> Switch -> various network devices (VoIP, Time Capsule, etc)

If your router has a built-in 10/100 switch, and you want gigabit speeds, I would connect all devices into the separate gigabit switch.

stubeeef
Jul 1, 2009, 09:51 PM
Here's how I would do it:

Cable modem -> Router -> Switch -> various network devices (VoIP, Time Capsule, etc)
Ooma and customers both believe they get great reliable service when the Ooma voip box is the first thing out of the cable modem.

If your router has a built-in 10/100 switch,
Well if my router is an Extreme than I will have a gigabit switch for 3 ports, no?
Can't a time capsule or airport extreme be the router? then use one of its ports to connect the switch? a second port for a printer and the third port for a NAS/Media Server?

monokakata
Jul 2, 2009, 06:35 AM
I've wired 3 houses (residences) by now, the most recent just a few months ago.

Other people are speaking clearly to the electronics issues, but I'll second the poster who said you don't need a managed switch. You don't! Unmanaged gigabit switches are not very expensive, and are just fine for your application.

Back to the physical wiring -- a patch panel is absolutely the way to go, as is finding a location for your "wiring closet," where all the non-computer electronics live near the patch panel.

Be sure you get a Cat6 panel -- if you're using Cat6 cable, you need a Cat6 panel. One poster mentioned the kind of panel that takes RJ45 on both sides. I think you'll be better off with punchdown. I've made a lot of ethernet cables using RJ45 and for me, at least, it's a headache to arrange the wires and crimp. But with a decent punchdown tool (the ones packaged with the jacks do work, but you really, really need a good tool) punching down the wires is quick and easy and, more to the point, effective for an amateur.

You'll need some installer tools, which you can get at Home Depot or equivalent: "installer drills," which are either twist or spade bits 18" or 24" or even longer, and sized properly for your cable's diameter. These are really indispensable. A strong (18 volt) cordless drill is a big help, too. Cable clamps. Zip ties. String (mason's cord is good) for pulling cables, if you need to (and it can be helpful, later on, if you pull a string when pulling a cable -- this lets you pull another cable if you need to).

Drill through joists and beams to route the cable, if possible (try hard...it's really the best way). See image for an example. Keep your signal cable as far away from AC cable as practical. Don't use the electrician's holes or routes unless you have absolutely no option. In the image, the electrician's work is to the left. My holes are passing ethernet, RG6, and cat3 telephone.

Pull the cable slowly! You don't want crimps.

Box all the wall plates. Home Depot has low-voltage open boxes. With signal cables, you don't have to follow AC code requirements. The open boxes are easy to use and give you lots of flexibility in routing the cable to the jack.

Watch out for tight cable bends -- avoid them whenever possible. Give yourself enough cable for each run, meaning a couple of feet extra. Cable is cheaper than your time. Don't punch anything down until all the cable is in place, if possible. Mark the cable ends in the wiring closet with a Sharpie (another essential installation tool).

One image is a shot of one of my wiring closets (5e, and before I got the Airport Extreme). As you can see, it's literally in a closet. But all the electronics are near to each other, and to the patch panels, which makes things very handy.

Another image shows the back of the patch panel from another (incomplete) installation.

Good luck!

stubeeef
Jul 2, 2009, 07:45 AM
Monokakata, awesome post.
Thank you.
Could you like specific products like the unmanaged switch you use? a "good" tool, and the panel?

My house is perfect for straight runs, new open style house with a central stair and closet area. I can run to the closet things are in now, or straight down to a basement closet and build an area there. It is ideal. Runs may get a bit long, but straight and easy, I will make large holes and install either conduit or pvc pipe in through the floor areas (I am lucky-designed the house myself).

Thanks for some links.....

Would there be an issue taking my cable runs and plug them directly to the switch instead of into a panel than a patch cable to the switch?
I am striving for a very simple solution, not need extravagant or esoteric

PS2: is this an unmanaged switch OR this http://www.netgear.com/Products/Switches/DesktopSwitches/GS116.aspx?

belvdr
Jul 2, 2009, 08:05 AM
One image is a shot of one of my wiring closets (5e, and before I got the Airport Extreme). As you can see, it's literally in a closet. But all the electronics are near to each other, and to the patch panels, which makes things very handy.

Another image shows the back of the patch panel from another (incomplete) installation.

Good luck!

How many times are you going to uplink that gear? ;)

belvdr
Jul 2, 2009, 08:08 AM
Ooma and customers both believe they get great reliable service when the Ooma voip box is the first thing out of the cable modem.


I don't see why that would even remotely affect it. The only thing that could affect this is if there is a ton of other traffic on the network causing high WAN usage, the router is not able to keep up, or Ooma has a bad product. I'm not sure if the Extreme can do it, but if you can setup QoS on it to guarantee your Ooma VoIP solution has enough bandwidth to operate, that would help.

Well if my router is an Extreme than I will have a gigabit switch for 3 ports, no?
Can't a time capsule or airport extreme be the router? then use one of its ports to connect the switch? a second port for a printer and the third port for a NAS/Media Server?

Yep, then plug them all into the Extreme. I wasn't sure what gear you were selecting.

stubeeef
Jul 2, 2009, 08:18 AM
I don't see why that would even remotely affect it. The only thing that could affect this is if there is a ton of other traffic on the network causing high WAN usage, the router is not able to keep up, or Ooma has a bad product. I'm not sure if the Extreme can do it, but if you can setup QoS on it to guarantee your Ooma VoIP solution has enough bandwidth to operate, that would help.
See attachments




Yep, then plug them all into the Extreme. I wasn't sure what gear you were selecting.
Ok, I had that in the posts and no one was mentioning it, I should have made it more prominent.

monokakata
Jul 2, 2009, 10:44 AM
How many times are you going to uplink that gear? ;)

I don't understand what you mean. I can take a joke, but I have to get it first!
Maybe I'm just slow today.

steviem
Jul 2, 2009, 10:56 AM
I guess they don't understand all of the cables being used, or maybe the colour coding for the cabling.

In regard to unmanaged switches, yeah, unmanaged is best for a network where vlans aren't necessary, however I think you will need gigabit ethernet if you are looking to share media over the network.

belvdr
Jul 2, 2009, 11:09 AM
I don't understand what you mean. I can take a joke, but I have to get it first!
Maybe I'm just slow today.

You have 3 switches, each uplinked to the next, then it appears an uplink there to another device.

monokakata
Jul 2, 2009, 11:16 AM
Monokakata, awesome post.
Thank you.
Could you like specific products like the unmanaged switch you use? a "good" tool, and the panel?



Would there be an issue taking my cable runs and plug them directly to the switch instead of into a panel than a patch cable to the switch?
I am striving for a very simple solution, not need extravagant or esoteric

PS2: is this an unmanaged switch OR this http://www.netgear.com/Products/Switches/DesktopSwitches/GS116.aspx?

The patch panel method is the best, because it's more flexible. You don't "patch in" the ports you're not using, until you need to use them. You can have fewer, even far fewer, ports on your switch than you have ports in your house. Yes, you can grab cables and connect them into and out of the switch ports, but doing that via a patch panel is much easier at installation time.

The patch panel stays in place, and if you move your equipment around you can adjust with different patch cable lengths -- hard to do if your long runs are just waving around in there. They could be too short.

You shouldn't pull cable with RJ45s attached. You're going to punch down at the remote end, so why not punch down in the wiring closet?

It's the standard procedure, and the most flexible. And in my limited experience, it's also the easiest -- it might not seem so right now, but when you get to work you'll see that it is.

The Netgear switch you link to would be fine, but probably more than you need. Remember, you don't have to have every port live all the time unless you're going to use them all. Count up how many devices you expect to have active at all times (remembering router/modem/NAS/etc) and then don't bother having more ports than that, at the beginning. You can add them later.

I use Netgear but that's just me. All the first-tier manufacturers make good gigabit switches.

Here's an example of a decent punch-down tool. I have a good one and an OK one and I do notice the difference between the good and OK. Good is better than OK.

OK one:
http://www.amazon.com/TRENDnet-TC-PDT-110W-Punch-Down/dp/B0000AZK4D/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&s=electronics&qid=1246550452&sr=8-2

Good one:
http://www.amazon.com/Greenlee-46023-Punchdown-Tool-Blade/dp/B0022TITAK/ref=sr_1_10?ie=UTF8&s=hi&qid=1246550452&sr=8-10

The patch panel seen from the back (blue cables) is like this one:

http://www.amazon.com/TRENDnet-16-port-Unshielded-Patch-Panel/dp/B0000AZK4C/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&s=electronics&qid=1246550769&sr=8-2

It seems fine.

Don't rush. A professional installer will be in and out in no time, but you won't be, just as I'm not. You can do a good job if you're careful, but you'll be a lot slower. Still, as one pro reminded me, my hourly rate is less.

I also have a UPS in the wiring closet, which keeps the network up for a while. I can switch to a laptop if necessary and still get out.

monokakata
Jul 2, 2009, 11:20 AM
You have 3 switches, each uplinked to the next, then it appears an uplink there to another device.

Got it. Good one, and I guess I am slow today.

I already had a few 5-port Netgears, so when I expanded the network I used them. Thus the uplinks.

The right link goes down to the router.

paduck
Jul 2, 2009, 06:23 PM
You should read some articles on structured wiring. Here is a good one. Not 100% current, but it is very, very good.

http://www.swhowto.com/

It pretty much covers everything. Good luck!

stubeeef
Jul 2, 2009, 08:16 PM
Another stupid question...sorry but I am full of them!

If I connect a printer to the gigabit ethernet port of an Extreme or Time Capsule. And that printer is only 10/100 not gigabit, does that drag down the entire system? OR just the communication with the printer?

Don't worry, more dumb ones to come! Stay tuned.....

Here is another one...
Since I don't want to do this twice, money is not too much an option (as long as I do this DIY) > should I pull and use Cat6a vs Cat6 cable? Can't find if they use the same connectors and it is just better cable.

Just found a claim from Cables4sure that Cat6a is backward compatible to Cat 5e and Cat 6. So it is somewhat future proof imho.

pricing some wires, looks like I could do things "my way" in Cat6 for $137 or in Cat6a for $313; a $176 premium. Any opinions???

steviem
Jul 3, 2009, 04:21 AM
Just the port that the printer is on so the comms with just that printer. We have older PCs with just 100mbps NICs on our Gigabit lan and my PC still gets Gigabit ethernet. Also, our Printers are 10/100 too and they don't affect the speeds for anything else on the network.

I don't know much about Cat 6a though, I'm afraid...

stubeeef
Jul 3, 2009, 08:14 AM
thanks, I was thinking that the printer would not drag down the entire network as long as it was on it's own cable from the router and nothing else behind it.

Alright, now recommend a NAS. Seems Netgears ReadyNAS products look Mac friendly enough.

I want to stream video to 3 or 4 places in the house. as well as be a backup box.

I know NOTHING about Raid.

Thanks for all the help and ideas.

Ap0k5
Jul 9, 2009, 06:18 AM
The ReadyNAS boxes are pretty good for storage. You can setup a number of RAID configurations depending on what you require, some common ones below:

Striping (R0) - Marginal improvement in read & write performance (depending on setup/usage), no data protection if one disk dies the RAID dies, you do get the full disk capacity though (4 1TB drives would give you 4TB of usable storage)

Mirroring (R1) - Better read speeds, data still exists if the mirrored pair breaks, you only get half the capacity of the drives (4 1TB drives would give you 2TB of usable storage in RAID1)

Distributed Parity (R5) - Better read performance, full data protection - if one drive fails you can replace the drive and rebuild the disk so no data loss, capacity is cut by 1 drive due to parity bit storage (4 1TB drives would give you 3TB of usable storage)

I'd suggest reading a few websites about RAID levels though, so you get the full details and can pick which would best suit your situation.

Streaming video will require a NAS box that has embedded streaming software or you'd need to use a standalone machine to stream the videos. AFAIK there would be file access problems if you're trying to play the same video file on more than one machine at a time through quicktime etc...

paduck
Jul 11, 2009, 05:55 PM
thanks, I was thinking that the printer would not drag down the entire network as long as it was on it's own cable from the router and nothing else behind it.

Alright, now recommend a NAS. Seems Netgears ReadyNAS products look Mac friendly enough.

I want to stream video to 3 or 4 places in the house. as well as be a backup box.

I know NOTHING about Raid.

Thanks for all the help and ideas.

There's a lot of NASs out there that would be good for you. ReadyNAS, Synology, Thecus, and Sans Digital all have their advocates. Remember that if you have an Airport Express Base Station or TimeCapsule you can just plug in a USB drive and get a NAS that way.

Couple thoughts:

1. You can have both a 100Base-T router and a Gig-E router. And it might be more effective. Remember, many of your devices might be at just 100BaseT. Why not have a 100BaseT wireless router with four ports connected to your Internet router (remember, the Internet is probably your slow bottleneck). Then you can put your 100BaseT items on there (VOIP, printer, AppleTV, legacy computer hardware, etc). Have a Gig-E router/hub hanging off it. Have all the Gig-E stuff together. You can get 7+ ports that way and have all the Gig-E stuff separated out. Might be cheaper than a larger Gig-E wireless hub.

2. As noted above, if you have an Airport Express Basestation or TimeCapsule, you can hang USB drives off it rather than a NAS, but get the same functionality.

3. Basic RAID is simple. You don't need RAID1, it only places you at enhanced risk. RAID1 and RAID5 are about availability, not backup - if one of the drives goes down, you are still in business. RAID1 is probably simpler. You basically have two drives that mirror each other (if you have 2 500MB drives, then you have 500MB of storage available). RAID5 means you have three or more drives that function as one drive (with an available data space as something smaller than the sum of the three), but any one of those drives can go down and you still have your data.

4. Don't mistake RAID for backup. You can use RAID as a backup source and you get redundant backup. If your RAID corrupted, your data is gone. Make sure you have a real backup solution (which might be that you take data from your main computer and do a Time Machine backup to your RAID volume). The point is to have the data in two separate places. IE - don't make the server that is hosting your video also be your backup server.

5. As mentioned above, a UPS is probably a good idea. And good protection from power surges.

Good luck!

stubeeef
Jul 11, 2009, 06:58 PM
Thanks paduck.

If I daisy chain 3 usb drives off a time capsule, would that work? Call one Movies, another Music, and third Pictures?

I could have the 3 combine to less than 1TB and use the timecapsule to back those up?

paduck
Jul 11, 2009, 07:30 PM
Thanks paduck.

If I daisy chain 3 usb drives off a time capsule, would that work? Call one Movies, another Music, and third Pictures?

I could have the 3 combine to less than 1TB and use the timecapsule to back those up?

Yes, I think you could do this. You might want to look at hanging something like this off your TC or AEBS:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000YTTRAG

Instead of three separate USB drives, you could have one enclosure with three drives. If your use the JBOD (Just a Bunch Of Disks) each one would show up as a separate volume. A lot simpler to manage. If the sum of the disks is less than 1TB, you could back them up to a TC. Alternately, having a fourth large disk in there would allow you to backup within the same enclosure. Not necessarily ideal, but if you had a 1.5TB or 2TB disk in the fourth slot, that would give you a lot of backup space (you could call drive four "Backup".

You could also get a smaller 2-bay version and put a pair of large drives in. Mirror them with RAID1 and make that your Time Machine backup drive (remember, you can put a multi-port USB hub onto an AEBS or TC). That way the backup is in a separate device than all your other data, providing protection against that device being your single point of failure.

stubeeef
Jul 11, 2009, 07:44 PM
it gets to be a little like

Isle or window?
Smoking or Non Smoking?
First Class or Coach?
One Way or Round Trip?
Excursion or Non Stop?
With a meal or without?
Regular or Vegetarian?

I guess I really need to plan this out. But of course that is what I am doing and why I am asking these questions.
I am looking for an "elegant" solution to what can be come something inelegant.

paduck
Jul 11, 2009, 10:01 PM
I guess I really need to plan this out. But of course that is what I am doing and why I am asking these questions.
I am looking for an "elegant" solution to what can be come something inelegant.

Exactly. You can piece together something pretty easily, but with some thought you can get an elegant solution that is much more streamlined and efficient.

Get the wiring done first and then look at what to do next.

stubeeef
Jul 11, 2009, 10:12 PM
I think I am going to go overboard a bit and use Cat6a wiring. I know that is way overkill, but I really only want to do this once. I am 48yrs old and don't want to have to kick up from gigabit when I am 65. Although wireless will probably surpass it all in a couple of months!

I am thinking I will use a 16 port gigabit unmanaged switch so that I can use some security cameras a bit later.

I am going to route everything to the basement, and then install a cabinet with an UPS battery backup.

I will have to do some work, at least one run will approach 100'.

Thanks for the info

paduck
Jul 11, 2009, 10:47 PM
I think I am going to go overboard a bit and use Cat6a wiring. I know that is way overkill, but I really only want to do this once. I am 48yrs old and don't want to have to kick up from gigabit when I am 65. Although wireless will probably surpass it all in a couple of months!

Not i 18 months, but one day. Still, wired will be rock solid reliable and have a sustained bandwidth near the spec - something wireless isn't going to give you. And no one will hijack your signal.

I think you'll be fine sticking with cat-5e. It can handle Gig-E. You run cable with the two cat-5e lines and two video lines to each wall outlet and you are going to be fine.

I am thinking I will use a 16 port gigabit unmanaged switch so that I can use some security cameras a bit later.

This should do you:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16833122139

The video cameras aren't going to require that speed. But everything in one hub does make things efficient.

I am going to route everything to the basement, and then install a cabinet with an UPS battery backup.

Good idea.

I will have to do some work, at least one run will approach 100'.

That's a long run - what is it - basement to attic, across the house and back down? Ethernet should handle it. I think the limit before you get problems i 250'.

Good luck. I'm jealous! Consider getting the work done by a professional. They are more expensive than doing it yourself, but they are a lot quicker and don't make mistakes that you have to troubleshoot. Plus, you are talking about going through walls...

gajraaj
Jul 23, 2009, 09:00 AM
This is a great thread and I have been reading it with a lot of interest. I was wondering if there is any update?

Also, I am planning to setup a similar network, but I am exploring the benefits of this effort and what it could be used for.

What are you planning to do with this/?

belvdr
Jul 23, 2009, 09:36 AM
That's a long run - what is it - basement to attic, across the house and back down? Ethernet should handle it. I think the limit before you get problems i 250'.

It's not that long for copper. I have gotten gigabit speeds at 407 feet using CAT5e. This was a temporary setup and would not recommend to do this in a live environment.

The theoretical limit is 100 meters (328 feet) for Ethernet over copper. Using fiber, you can get up to 120km (74.5 miles) unamplified.

SHIFTLife
Jul 23, 2009, 02:05 PM
For what it's worth, I'd save my money and run Cat5E instead of Cat 6. There's really no need for Cat6 in a home network, even if you want to do Gigabit. Cat5E will carry gigabit speeds with no difference over Cat6. Cat6 is a good starting point if you want to start with gigabit and move beyond in the future to technologies like 10GbE, which is overkill in every sense of the word for a home install.

I'm running a gigabit-to-the-desktop network at work with Cat5E carrying the Ethernet, and we've seen no problems over the past few years.

cube
Jul 23, 2009, 02:13 PM
I would buy 1Gb equipment but already lay out 10GbE cable.

jgrove
Aug 6, 2009, 03:01 AM
I ran, external grade 5e cable, outside the house, 5e cable inside. my cable modem has one gigabit output this goes to a NetGear SRXN3205 router, from there 1 uplink to an 8 port managed NetGear Gigabit switch, from there to some of the rooms in the house and ReadyNAS and MacPro (LAG) a PC.

The remaining outputs from the SRXN go to a EVA9150 and PS3 and one of bedroom.

pheew what a load of work!

Cheers

Forget Cat6 just not worth it, for a house, use 5e and save yourself some money. Gigabit is plenty quick enough, and untill the ISP's provide much higher upstreams and downstreams i really cannot see it being an issue.

paduck
Aug 8, 2009, 09:19 PM
I got tired of running a wireless signal from my desktop Mac (the 802.11g was the bottleneck moving files to my AppleTV). So I ran about 60 feet of Cat5e cable through the attic out to the router on the floor below. I was fortunate there were some pre-existing holes in the wall and I just piggy-backed on them. I had to drill a couple holes as well, but not too big a deal. Having never punched down an RJ45 connector, I was a little wary, but everything went find on the first try. I'm using the ethernet connection now. Despite no apparent need, I would run wires to all the rooms in my house if I had a pipe to run into the basement!

One question, does anyone know how to test the maximum speed of a connection? I am sure I can hit in the vicinity of 100Mbps, but not so sure about Gig-E. That will only help me if I add a Gig-E NAS, but I just wanted to test the punch-down job I did on the cable! :)