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View Full Version : The Post-Core i7 Era Unveiled


MacBytes
Jul 8, 2009, 08:49 AM
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Category: Processors
Link: The Post-Core i7 Era Unveiled (http://www.macbytes.com/link.php?sid=20090708094953)
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Posted on MacBytes.com (http://www.macbytes.com)
Approved by Mudbug

Tallest Skil
Jul 8, 2009, 08:55 AM
So we're just going to ignore Gulftown and Arrandale, then?

Westmere: "No respect, no respect! Nyuk, nyuk, nyuk..."

wrldwzrd89
Jul 8, 2009, 09:16 AM
What caught my eye in this article was the AVX additions. It's about time Intel caught up with PowerPC's AltiVec system - SSE4's good, but not good enough. Yet. :p

iGary
Jul 8, 2009, 09:16 AM
I've lost track of the whole roadmap. It almost doesn't matter anymore (at least to me).

Blue Fox
Jul 8, 2009, 09:42 AM
I've lost track of the whole roadmap. It almost doesn't matter anymore (at least to me).

I'm with you on that.

diamond.g
Jul 8, 2009, 10:27 AM
I've lost track of the whole roadmap. It almost doesn't matter anymore (at least to me).

For your average Mac user it actually doesn't matter. The only positive for those that care, is all the choices Apple could go with in the future. Plus it gives you something to look forward to.

Evangelion
Jul 8, 2009, 10:28 AM
What caught my eye in this article was the AVX additions. It's about time Intel caught up with PowerPC's AltiVec system - SSE4's good, but not good enough. Yet. :p

The superiority of Altivec didn't stop PowerPC from being trounced by x86 when it came to performance, now did it?

wrldwzrd89
Jul 8, 2009, 01:05 PM
The superiority of Altivec didn't stop PowerPC from being trounced by x86 when it came to performance, now did it?
This is true. Still, though - x86 users could use a vector performance boost.

chrmjenkins
Jul 8, 2009, 02:21 PM
I'm not sure that this gives us any new info other than a fuzzy picture of a die.

nuckinfutz
Jul 8, 2009, 02:27 PM
The superiority of Altivec didn't stop PowerPC from being trounced by x86 when it came to performance, now did it?

Depends

Intel process always did a good job on Integer performance the the G5 processor owned for Floating Point.

Your statement is half correct at best.

spanading
Jul 8, 2009, 03:00 PM
I love hearing about new things especially when it means faster easier or better, I guess I am just a 34 year old kid! However I'm confused didn't the chip industry try this before and then abandon it due to heat issues or other problems that I cannot remember. I guess they must have decided to go with discreet cores and very fast interconnectors similar to the muti-core cpus from Intel?

Anyway if it is going to work viva la speed!

nuckinfutz
Jul 8, 2009, 03:13 PM
I love hearing about new things especially when it means faster easier or better, I guess I am just a 34 year old kid! However I'm confused didn't the chip industry try this before and then abandon it due to heat issues or other problems that I cannot remember. I guess they must have decided to go with discreet cores and very fast interconnectors similar to the muti-core cpus from Intel?

Anyway if it is going to work viva la speed!

It's all about shrinking the fab process. I remember Intel and AMD struggling at 65nm but now at least Intel seems to have their engineering down pat.

I'm a bit concerned about IGP integration because Intel has been so abysmal at delivering good graphics performance.

AVX looks good. 256-bit and additional instructions should deliver a marked increase in some areas. Sandy Bridge seems to be parlaying Intel's know how in L3 technology and bringing it to consumers. It's interesting to see how the L2 caches have grown and then shrunk depending on the CPU design.

chrmjenkins
Jul 8, 2009, 04:16 PM
It's all about shrinking the fab process. I remember Intel and AMD struggling at 65nm but now at least Intel seems to have their engineering down pat.

I'm a bit concerned about IGP integration because Intel has been so abysmal at delivering good graphics performance.

AVX looks good. 256-bit and additional instructions should deliver a marked increase in some areas. Sandy Bridge seems to be parlaying Intel's know how in L3 technology and bringing it to consumers. It's interesting to see how the L2 caches have grown and then shrunk depending on the CPU design.

Don't worry, it will get hairy again when they start looking at sub-22nm tech.