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View Full Version : What open source can learn from Apple


MacBytes
Jul 11, 2009, 11:18 PM
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Category: Opinion/Interviews
Link: What open source can learn from Apple (http://www.macbytes.com/link.php?sid=20090712001833)
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Posted on MacBytes.com (http://www.macbytes.com)
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jayducharme
Jul 12, 2009, 12:58 PM
Bad Web sites are built by people who know how to code HTML and JavaScript but don't understand how people use the Web. Bad software is written by people who are experts at knowing how a computer works and how to write code to make it do what they want, but no idea about how regular people behave and how those people expect to interact with that software.
Apple's the kind of company that makes decisions based on people, on users, and then challenges its engineers to find ways to fulfill those needs.

And there it is in a nutshell. The interesting thing is, it's much easier to teach someone how to be a good technician than it is to teach them how to be a good designer. That's why IMO Apple will stay ahead of the pack for quite a while.

windywoo
Jul 12, 2009, 01:41 PM
Pure bollocks. Linux programs are easy to use, people just lack familiarity. Difficulties arise when your hardware isn't supported, but this won't be solved by copying Apple.

MisterMe
Jul 12, 2009, 09:16 PM
Pure bollocks. Linux programs are easy to use, people just lack familiarity. ...This attitude is a prime example of what the author is talking about.

Tenebrous
Jul 13, 2009, 08:43 AM
Pure bollocks. Linux programs are easy to use, people just lack familiarity. Difficulties arise when your hardware isn't supported, but this won't be solved by copying Apple.

Apple places MUCH LESS of a mental load on the user in using their software and hardware than either Microsoft or Linux. I know you derive your self-esteem by proving how you can wade through shell prompts and config files just to use an app or an OS, but such futile bravado is singularly unimpressive. I'll exert my effort on the product, not on the app or the OS, thank you. And you know what? Creative professionals, by and large, agree. So all you have is a set of seriously misplaced priorities coupled to a pernicious case of big brain syndrome. Sucks to be you, man.

windywoo
Jul 14, 2009, 12:04 AM
Apple places MUCH LESS of a mental load on the user in using their software and hardware than either Microsoft or Linux. I know you derive your self-esteem by proving how you can wade through shell prompts and config files just to use an app or an OS, but such futile bravado is singularly unimpressive. I'll exert my effort on the product, not on the app or the OS, thank you. And you know what? Creative professionals, by and large, agree. So all you have is a set of seriously misplaced priorities coupled to a pernicious case of big brain syndrome. Sucks to be you, man.

Used Linux recently? You don't require command line to surf the net. You don't require command line to setup email. If all your hardware is supported you won't have to do any configuring either. Linux programs these days are point and click like Windows and OSX, you just have to learn to point and click in different places. Of course there are Linux programs that require editing config files and command line installation, but the average user should have no need for these, everything they need is provided by one of the desktop packages.

MorphingDragon
Jul 14, 2009, 05:55 AM
Decent GUIs.

Yes I went there. Compiz + Gnome (GTK) is a terrible GUI. KDE + kWin (QT) is several steps forward but is a bit buggy. Yes I work with Linux everyday. Even with the notoriously stable RHEL. Linux has a lot to learn.

clevin
Jul 14, 2009, 07:24 AM
nothing.

there might be thing linux SHOULD learn from APPLE. Such as "if you are tiny in the market, try to bundle hardware with software", and "uniform your brand!"

But can they? its anti-freedom and anti-linux spirit.

Bread is important, but without free spirit, linux may well just go die.