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Simon L
Jun 7, 2004, 06:34 AM
I set up my powerbook on the work network and everything was going fine until I came into work today...Over the wkend I set up a wireless network at home for my powerbook, and now I can see the network at work but I can't get online through it! Any ideas, can you save different wireless networks on your mac or can you only have one??

wrldwzrd89
Jun 7, 2004, 07:26 AM
I set up my powerbook on the work network and everything was going fine until I came into work today...Over the wkend I set up a wireless network at home for my powerbook, and now I can see the network at work but I can't get online through it! Any ideas, can you save different wireless networks on your mac or can you only have one??
In theory, Mac OS X should cope with this situation better than other operating systems because of its multihoming support. I'd recommend dealing with this by setting up two locations in System Preferences: one with your home settings, and the other with your work settings. When you move from one environment to the other, just switch locations and Mac OS X should automatically adapt. If you travel on the road and have different settings for when you're working but away from the office, make a location for that, too.

Simon L
Jun 7, 2004, 07:33 AM
Pardon my ignorance but how do i set it up 2 network settings in system pref?

wrldwzrd89
Jun 7, 2004, 07:39 AM
Pardon my ignorance but how do i set it up 2 network settings in system pref?
I'm not at my Mac right now, but I'll try my best:
In the Network pane of System Preferences, there is an option called Location. Pull that down and create a new location. Configure it for home/work/road, then repeat for other locations. When you need to switch, just go into Network and choose a different location as the current one.

Simon L
Jun 7, 2004, 09:05 AM
I'm not at my Mac right now, but I'll try my best:
In the Network pane of System Preferences, there is an option called Location. Pull that down and create a new location. Configure it for home/work/road, then repeat for other locations. When you need to switch, just go into Network and choose a different location as the current one.

I'll give that a go thanks....

Celeron
Jun 7, 2004, 10:01 AM
Thats strange. I have a 12'' Powerbook, rev. B, and mine switches wireless networks seemlessly. I have a wireless network in my apartment and my college has wireless in the academic buildings. I can walk from my apartment, to any academic building and my Powerbook switches automatically (or automagically as the case may be).

I didn't have to do anything, other than point it to the network for the first time. (Airport icon in bar --> Other --> enter network name and any required security info). When it asked me if I wanted to remember the network, I said yes.

Sorry I can't provide any more info, but thats all I've ever had to do.

wrldwzrd89
Jun 7, 2004, 10:03 AM
Thats strange. I have a 12'' Powerbook, rev. B, and mine switches wireless networks seemlessly. I have a wireless network in my apartment and my college has wireless in the academic buildings. I can walk from my apartment, to any academic building and my Powerbook switches automatically (or automagically as the case may be).

I didn't have to do anything, other than point it to the network for the first time. (Airport icon in bar --> Other --> enter network name and any required security info). When it asked me if I wanted to remember the network, I said yes.

Sorry I can't provide any more info, but thats all I've ever had to do.
That's the way Mac OS X is SUPPOSED to handle networking, Celeron - so what Simon L is experiencing is strange. I said in my earlier post that Mac OS X is multihoming - your situation, Celeron, is a perfect example of how multihoming is supposed to work.

Celeron
Jun 7, 2004, 10:54 AM
Not to nitpick here, but I believe you are using the word multihomed to refer to the wrong thing. Multihoming, as it has traditionally been known, is a machine with 2 or more network cards. In that case, every Powerbook that has a ethernet card and an airport card is multihomed. The ability to switch wireless networks seemlessly is something different entirely.

winwintoo
Jun 7, 2004, 11:04 AM
I have a wireless network at home and my sister has one at her house. I take my PowerBook to her house and it automatically picks up her network.

How this might be happening is that HER network used to be mine. It was my AEBS and I had my PB set to automatically lock on to it. Then I got a Linksys router for my house, set my PB to automatically lock on to the Linksys.

I then set up the AEBS at Sis's house with the same network name etc. as I was using at my house. Now when I visit with my PB it *thinks* it's still the same network and climbs on board.

It works.

m

wrldwzrd89
Jun 7, 2004, 11:09 AM
Not to nitpick here, but I believe you are using the word multihomed to refer to the wrong thing. Multihoming, as it has traditionally been known, is a machine with 2 or more network cards. In that case, every Powerbook that has a ethernet card and an airport card is multihomed. The ability to switch wireless networks seemlessly is something different entirely.
I thought Apple used this term in previous descriptions of Mac OS X's automatic networking feature. Of course, it's now called "automatic networking" rather than "multihoming".

mactastic
Jun 7, 2004, 11:45 AM
Make sure your Airport preferences are set to automatically log onto the strongest network signal and to remember the password. If it's set to log onto a specific network instead, you'll have to log on manually.

7on
Jun 7, 2004, 12:03 PM
His work wireless might be experiencing trouble. At my campus the library wireless routinely goes out without any notification. I usually have to find someone and have them check to make sure it's not my card.

Soc7777777
Jun 7, 2004, 12:11 PM
His work wireless might be experiencing trouble. At my campus the library wireless routinely goes out without any notification. I usually have to find someone and have them check to make sure it's not my card.

if you go to truman... how is their wireless network? how much of the campus is it in... and how fast is the connection Mbits/sec

7on
Jun 7, 2004, 12:16 PM
if you go to truman... how is their wireless network? how much of the campus is it in... and how fast is the connection Mbits/sec

http://its.truman.edu/documentation/wireless.stm

*note when it says the Quad, what it really means is the bench outside the Library. Hopefully they'll fix the Library next year. It was down practically 70% of the time last year. They do have areas with ethernet hookups around there, so it's not a total loss.

Though a little reminder, you might want to turn off your wireless when you're not using it. It seems the people sometimes forget to turn off their broadcasting option on their cards and my computer always seems to want to connect to those.

winwintoo
Jun 7, 2004, 12:41 PM
http://its.truman.edu/documentation/wireless.stm

*note when it says the Quad, what it really means is the bench outside the Library

:D :D :D :D

Cr@P - I went to check my settings and messed something up and now I can't connect on my own network, shows how smart I am. Glad my neighbor never messes with his :mad: :mad:

m