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View Full Version : The Beleaguered Microsoft: The Evidence Mounts


MacBytes
Jul 16, 2009, 08:38 AM
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Category: Opinion/Interviews
Link: The Beleaguered Microsoft: The Evidence Mounts (http://www.macbytes.com/link.php?sid=20090716093855)
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Posted on MacBytes.com (http://www.macbytes.com)
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surferfromuk
Jul 16, 2009, 03:40 PM
Google may get the bottom of the market, Apple may have the top but there is nothing for the middle except Microsoft - as long as that is the case Microsoft will always have a massive effortless market-share.

Put simply there is no alternative to Microsoft...

MisterMe
Jul 16, 2009, 04:27 PM
...

Put simply there is no alternative to Microsoft...No. There are most certainly alternatives to Microsoft in the spaces where it is dominant. It is just that Microsoft is the 600 pound gorilla. However, it is being forced to go the Biggest Loser ranch. As it loses weight, you are likely to see Microsoft's current competitors come out of their cubby holes and new competitors step up.

pdjudd
Jul 16, 2009, 04:38 PM
Put simply there is no alternative to Microsoft...

I think you mean viable alternative.

mkrishnan
Jul 16, 2009, 04:45 PM
you are likely to see Microsoft's current competitors come out of their cubby holes and new competitors step up.

And if they think like Linux distribution architects, Microsoft will do just fine. ;)

Who knows. I have a netbook. After running Linux on it for a year I got sick of the hassle and bought a copy of XP. I might try Google's OS on it. Or both of Google's OSes if Android becomes an option also.

It could go over reasonably well if Google makes some progress in getting their OS to install smoothly on different netbook hardware. If their early launch is plagued by levels ocf "works out of the box" that the Linux community considers excellent but the Win/Mac communities consider unacceptably poor, then I think they may have trouble.

Also I would hope they are aggressively working with Adobe to make sure Flash runs reasonably well. Flash performance on the Atom in Windows has some gaps in its acceptability, Flash performance in Linux is really not very good.

MisterMe
Jul 16, 2009, 11:55 PM
And if they think like Linux distribution architects, Microsoft will do just fine. ;)

Who knows. I have a netbook. After running Linux on it for a year I got sick of the hassle and bought a copy of XP. I might try Google's OS on it. ...Google's Chrome OS is yet another Linux distro. From where I sit, there is exactly one thing standing between Linux and viability as a Microsoft competitor. That one thing is Linux. By this, I mean that Linux suffers from too many chiefs and not enough Indians. Pick a distro. Pick a Windows manager. Make good choices, but make a decision. Then evangelize the Linux developer community to support this combination. It doesn't have to be as refined as MacOS X. It just has to be refined enough to attract non-theological customers. If Linux developers and advocates continue to fight among themselves, then Apple will continue as the only viable competition to Microsoft.

Tenebrous
Jul 17, 2009, 11:16 AM
What's missing is here is that slowly, bit by bit, Microsoft is having to settle for less and less of the pie.

DoNoHarm
Jul 17, 2009, 11:20 AM
Watch out guys... while we're talking about Microsoft's decline, I've been getting the feeling more and more that Apple is BECOMING the new Microsoft. With this constant rejection of Apps for no apparent reason, it just feels like the Apple world is getting more and more closed.

pdjudd
Jul 17, 2009, 11:32 AM
Make good choices, but make a decision.
A nobile proposition, but I see about as much chance of that happening as Microsoft going bankrupt. The foundation of Linux is that you can choose anything that is availble. Its open source nature almost guarantees that it's going to happen because it's the antithesis of limitations. You just can't get a community to agree on everything. Heck, that doesn't even happen with closed source standards.

Linux is really fragmented because people are devoted to different aspects of Linux and people don't want to loose something that they chose when the licensing says you don't have to. As long as there is the open source nature to Linux, it is going to stay divided in some fashion.

MisterMe
Jul 17, 2009, 04:54 PM
... I've been getting the feeling more and more that Apple is BECOMING the new Microsoft. With this constant rejection of Apps for no apparent reason, it just feels like the Apple world is getting more and more closed.Whether you are talking about legal or illegal behavior, what you are describing has absolutely nothing to do with Microsoft or its behavior. Microsoft's monopolistic behavior was ruled illegal because the Redmond Monopoly controlled third-party hardware. To the contrary, Apple is using every legal avenue to control its own hardware. Microsoft employed various strategies to control competitor's access to Windows, but it never setup anything with the formal ability to permit or forbid Windows applications from being sold.

Bottomline: Just because Apple and Microsoft engage in behavior that you don't like does not mean the two behaviors have anything to do with each other.

nagromme
Jul 17, 2009, 05:41 PM
Whether you are talking about legal or illegal behavior, what you are describing has absolutely nothing to do with Microsoft or its behavior. Microsoft's monopolistic behavior was ruled illegal because the Redmond Monopoly controlled third-party hardware. To the contrary, Apple is using every legal avenue to control its own hardware. Microsoft employed various strategies to control competitor's access to Windows, but it never setup anything with the formal ability to permit or forbid Windows applications from being sold.

Bottomline: Just because Apple and Microsoft engage in behavior that you don't like does not mean the two behaviors have anything to do with each other.

And we all know very WELL what the reason is for weird App Store rejections: the system is flawed, both internally and in terms of communication, and has been unable to adapt to the avalanche of different apps as quickly as anyone would like. Blatant problems that help nobody--not devs, not Apple--have remained for a surprisingly long time.

In short, it's because the approval process is messed up, not because it's evil or greedy or trying to be a "monopoly" or trying to control the world. Apple's system processes thousands of apps and makes dozens of mistakes. Ridiculous ones. And it has improved a lot, and will keep doing so. It's run by people, and they've made some bad calls, but they're learning too.

But "Apple is the new Microsoft" sounds catchy, and that's all people need in order to repeat it :) No thinking required.