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munkees
Jul 21, 2009, 09:10 PM
I have purchased one HD movie from apple (3:10 to Yuma) dimensions are 1280x534 that is less than 720p which is 1280x720. so what are apples HD movies.

I also have another movie rented which is 1280x692 (much closer).

I thought Apples iTunes did 720p.



aprofetto
Jul 21, 2009, 09:16 PM
Could just be taking into account the black bars on the top and bottom.

In order to fit the width, they have to shrink the height a bit, and thus is why its a bit smaller... I think anyways.

Tallest Skil
Jul 21, 2009, 09:21 PM
There is no set way to film a movie. Some are released in 16:9, others in 2.39:1.

munkees
Jul 21, 2009, 09:22 PM
Could just be taking into account the black bars on the top and bottom.

In order to fit the width, they have to shrink the height a bit, and thus is why its a bit smaller... I think anyways.

no I have a HDTV connected to an :apple:TV, It should not need to be shrunk. my TV's can do 1080i and 720p.

munkees
Jul 21, 2009, 09:25 PM
There is no set way to film a movie. Some are released in 16:9, others in 2.39:1.

ok 720p is aspect radio of 16:9 I guess I should look for this info when buying movies.

Tallest Skil
Jul 21, 2009, 09:28 PM
ok 720p is aspect radio of 16:9 I guess I should look for this info when buying movies.

You don't get it.

2.39:1 is superior to 16:9. You're not losing anything by not having "720p"; 720p is worthless. SO few movies are even made in 16:9...

Jeffrosproto
Jul 21, 2009, 09:33 PM
Perfectly normal, dude. Just don't worry about it. You are still getting the correct width, which is all that matters.

aprofetto
Jul 21, 2009, 09:36 PM
There is no set way to film a movie. Some are released in 16:9, others in 2.39:1.

Thats how I meant to say it.

aprofetto
Jul 21, 2009, 09:37 PM
no I have a HDTV connected to an :apple:TV, It should not need to be shrunk. my TV's can do 1080i and 720p.

I didn't mean it was shrinking to fit your TV, I was talking about the aspect ratio like Tallest Skill was saying, obviously alot better worded than what I was getting at.

munkees
Jul 21, 2009, 09:39 PM
Perfectly normal, dude. Just don't worry about it. You are still getting the correct width, which is all that matters.

funny people seem to focus on the width but the 720p is about the height not width,

720p = 1280x720
1080i = 1920x720
1080p = 1920x1080

so when I see a hd movie less than 720 then to me it some where between EDTV and HDTV, greater than 576p

well still look better than sd, I will shut up now.

aprofetto
Jul 21, 2009, 09:45 PM
funny people seem to focus on the width but the 720p is about the height not width,

720p = 1280x720
1080i = 1920x720
1080p = 1920x1080

so when I see a hd movie less than 720 then to me it some where between EDTV and HDTV, greater than 576p

well still look better than sd, I will shut up now.

lol, no you are right, you don't need to shut up.

But like Tallest Skill was saying, movies can have a range of aspect ratios.

1280x720 is a 16:9 aspect ratio.

But that doesn't mean that all movies are filmed or produced with an aspect ratio of 16:9.

And to clarify, 1080i does not equal 1920x720. The i refers to how the picture is displayed on the screen, interlaced I believe, its still the same resolution as the 1080p.

munkees
Jul 21, 2009, 09:58 PM
lol, no you are right, you don't need to shut up.

But like Tallest Skill was saying, movies can have a range of aspect ratios.

1280x720 is a 16:9 aspect ratio.

But that doesn't mean that all movies are filmed or produced with an aspect ratio of 16:9.

And to clarify, 1080i does not equal 1920x720. The i refers to how the picture is displayed on the screen, interweaving I believe, its still the same resolution as the 1080p.


from wikipedia

While 1080i has more scan lines than 720p, they do not translate directly into greater vertical resolution. Interlaced video is usually blurred vertically (filtered) to prevent twitter. Twitter is a flickering of fine horizontal lines in a scene, lines that are so fine that they only occur on a single scan line. Because only half the scan lines are drawn per field, fine horizontal lines may be missing entirely from one of the fields, causing them to flicker. Images are blurred vertically to ensure that no detail is only one scan line in height. Therefore, 1080i material does not deliver 1080 scan lines of vertical resolution. However 1080i provides a 1920-pixel horizontal resolution, greater than 720p's 1280 resolution.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/720p#720p_versus_1080i

aprofetto
Jul 21, 2009, 10:06 PM
from wikipedia

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/720p#720p_versus_1080i

Please forgive me if I'm wrong, but I think thats just talking about scan lines, I still think 1080i offers 1920x1080 resolution.

EDIT: If 1080i really was 1920x720, you'd have one hell of a stretched image. 2/3's of your tv would be consumed by black bars on the top and bottom.

munkees
Jul 21, 2009, 10:11 PM
Please forgive me if I'm wrong, but I think thats just talking about scan lines, I still think 1080i offers 1920x1080 resolution.

EDIT: If 1080i really was 1920x720, you'd have one hell of a stretched image. 2/3's of your tv would be consumed by black bars on the top and bottom.

I trying to get to grip with all this, bare with me. I guess it less information than 1080p, so it not as smooth

aprofetto
Jul 21, 2009, 10:12 PM
I trying to get to grip with all this, bare with me. I guess it less information than 1080p, so it not as smooth

Exactly. I do believe 1080p is a nicer picture than 1080i.

And don't worry, theres no better time to learn than the present!

Is it starting to make sense now?

r.j.s
Jul 21, 2009, 10:14 PM
Please forgive me if I'm wrong, but I think thats just talking about scan lines, I still think 1080i offers 1920x1080 resolution.

you are correct. The picture is still 1080 vertical lines, but it takes two frames to make a complete image. One frame will have the odd numbered lines, and the next frame will hold the even numbered lines.

OP, to answer your original question, the videos are 720p. Since very few movies are actually filmed in 16:9, most movies end up with the letterbox bars on the top and bottom. Since iTunes movies don't have these bars, the video seems smaller.

gatepc
Jul 22, 2009, 02:43 AM
I trying to get to grip with all this, bare with me. I guess it less information than 1080p, so it not as smooth

the only difference is that 1080i is interlaced ( thats what the I stands for ) and if you don't know what interlacing is its the way the tv displays the image instead of just displaying it all at once it does half and then goes back and does the other half

1080p is progressive and does the whole image at once