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YaWA?
Jul 22, 2009, 06:27 PM
Hi.

First time poster here on MacRumors, and I have a question for you seasoned Logic 8 vets. A little background:

I've been playing around with GarageBand on my first gen MacBook for a little while now and bought Mary Plummer's Apple Pro Training Series book on GB '09 (http://www.amazon.com/Apple-Training-GarageBand-Mary-Plummer/dp/0321648528/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1248304712&sr=8-1). And don't get me wrong, it was nice . . . for beginners (e.g. how to jam with the virtual band, how to use the lesson store). It just wasn't a good fit for me because most of it I had already figured out on my own.

So I think I'm ready to graduate to Logic, and I was wondering what the consensus was on David Nahmani's APTS book on Logic 8. I saw his book mentioned on a couple of posts here, but nothing extensive (not on the sticky of recommended reading either). And apparently he has a "Beyond the Basics" book aimed at the intermediate/advanced set.

So are they worth getting? Is the first more of a rehash/explanation of the manuals included w/ the Logic 8 software? I feel comfortable with GarageBand but the prospect of diving into Logic Studio alone kind of freaks me out. Any advice?

Thanks



salientstimulus
Jul 22, 2009, 06:42 PM
I can't comment on the book, but I can say a few things about the Logic manuals (i have LE, but almost all of the core features are identical).

First off, the basic interface is similar to GB, so you're already in a good starting place (instead of 'locking' tracks, you 'freeze' them, complete with a little snowflake icon). Logic comes with a ~100 page 'getting started' pdf, which is probably actually worth printing out and reading cover-to-cover. The other manuals are massive: 'User Manual' at 1055 pages, and 'Instruments and Effects' at 458 pages, are the important ones. While you're probably never going to sit down and read them, they are pretty handy -- any time I have any question or frustration, I just open it and search in preview, and can usually find exactly what I'm looking for in a couple minutes.

So, unless you're totally averse to a little trial-and-error learning, I'd say start using Logic, and start shopping for books if you feel the need later on.

ChrisA
Jul 23, 2009, 01:33 AM
I can't comment on the book, but I can say a few things about the Logic manuals (i have LE, but almost all of the core features are identical).


I agree. Apples manuals are good reference works. They explain any question you might have about the details of how it works. But they are not good to read cover to cover, they are reference works. Apple's 100 page intro is to light weight to be of use, no depth at all.

If you want to learn the big picture and come up to speed fast watch a good tutorial video. These are like 8 hours long like a full-up intro class. Then after that use the Apple reference to read up on just what you need. The best vides are at http://www.macprovideo.com/browse/logic

lynda.com has some too. both web sites lets you see samples for free. Lynda's are better deals because you can buy a subscription and watch 24x7 for $25.

I think the video backedup up by the user manual is the best way to learn. Well that and just do projects and learn by doing

YaWA?
Jul 23, 2009, 12:26 PM
Thanks for the advice!

Now that Logic 9 is out, I think I'll see what I can do with the manuals/included docs and wait for the APTS books and pro videos to catch up.

salientstimulus
Jul 23, 2009, 11:59 PM
If you want to learn the big picture and come up to speed fast watch a good tutorial video. These are like 8 hours long like a full-up intro class. Then after that use the Apple reference to read up on just what you need. The best vides are at http://www.macprovideo.com/browse/logic

lynda.com has some too. both web sites lets you see samples for free. Lynda's are better deals because you can buy a subscription and watch 24x7 for $25.

It looks like both sites offer a $25/month subscription, and macprovideo has a lot more offerings (although they don't specify how long each 'course' is).
https://www.macprovideo.com/subscribe/

deej999
Jul 24, 2009, 07:09 AM
The Nahmani book is very good. I like the tutorials at macprovideo better. Much better than lynda - more choice, depth, better trainers. easy choice!

It shows how long is each series. Like Logic 101 is 430 minutes. On their forum they said Logic 9 101 will be free update for owners of Logic 8 101 download. Perfect for me!

I got a coupon code for subscription service:
https://www.macprovideo.com/subscribe/?st=beta

gives you $18.75 a month. Great deal :D

You know Logic 9 manual is online?
http://documentation.apple.com/en/logicpro/

deej

YaWA?
Jul 24, 2009, 12:55 PM
Great, thanks. FYI: looks like the new Nahmani book is slated for late September.

And yes--I've already been looking through the manual. My copy is supposed to arrive tomorrow--I can't wait!

CalumC
Aug 4, 2009, 09:25 AM
The best vides are at http://www.macprovideo.com/browse/logic



Some of that content looks really good, but from watching one of the free ones, the guys voice is so annoying that I don't think I could take it.

joshjoshwest
Aug 7, 2009, 06:15 AM
Hi guys, I've been trying for a while to plug my Korg ElecTribe drum machine into my mac. I have been using a midi-usb connection and want to control it through Logic Express 8.

I was just wondering if this is even possible, and if anyone has managed to do it.

originalcliche
Aug 8, 2009, 12:52 AM
My audio engineering school used David's book to teach logic 8. Its awsome!

Hi guys, I've been trying for a while to plug my Korg ElecTribe drum machine into my mac. I have been using a midi-usb connection and want to control it through Logic Express 8.

I was just wondering if this is even possible, and if anyone has managed to do it.

Well you can create an external midi track in the sequencer to record the midi information/patterns from your electribe.

What is it exactly that you wantto do with it?