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View Full Version : argh...convert a file and change bitrate and sampling




virilep
Jul 30, 2009, 01:44 PM
So I'm a newbie... I'll admit it. I am using itunes, switch, and audacity and I can't figure this out.

I have a set of files (32 of them) and I need them to be the same bit rate and sample rate. (I am making a dvd audio)

and 8 of them are 64 kpbs and 22.05khz while the rest are 32 kpbs and 22.05khz.

I just can't figure out how to get the to be the same... anyone have a better solution?


(they are audio files of lectures for class)

Thanks so much.



salientstimulus
Jul 30, 2009, 06:39 PM
I'm assuming they are currently mp3s? Also, I'm a little unclear why they need to be identical format for use on a DVD -- what software are you using to author the DVD? Is it unable to import the audio correctly?

Anyway, if you use Audacity to 'Export as .WAV', the output files should all be in identical format.

virilep
Jul 30, 2009, 07:37 PM
I'm assuming they are currently mp3s? Also, I'm a little unclear why they need to be identical format for use on a DVD -- what software are you using to author the DVD? Is it unable to import the audio correctly?

Anyway, if you use Audacity to 'Export as .WAV', the output files should all be in identical format.

I am using DVD Audiofile. It's the best I could come up with to make DVD audios. unless there is a much better method?

salientstimulus
Jul 30, 2009, 11:05 PM
Yeah, I don't know about that (or really any DVD authoring software). Doesn't iMovie allow you to burn to DVD?

Anyway, see if DVD Audiofile lets you use WAV files -- if so, then just open all your files in Audacity and export as WAVs.

ChrisA
Jul 31, 2009, 12:43 AM
I am using DVD Audiofile. It's the best I could come up with to make DVD audios. unless there is a much better method?

You must know already that those low sample rate audio files will not sound better after conversion.

Audicity will allow you to "re-sample" the files to any sample rate you like and save to any supported format. BUt you say it's not working for you. There are other options....

If yuo are able to use the terminal "sox" will process all your files in one shot to any output file specification Google will find sox. It is designed exactly for this purpose.

"Toast" will make music DVDs and you can just drag in whatever files you have and it will convert them automatically. This is by far the easiest way to go but costs $100.

So you have to chose between typing a command into a terminal window and spending $100. but both are fast and simple.

WinterMute
Jul 31, 2009, 03:19 AM
Put them into iTunes and us the convert function to change them all into whatever you want, you'll just have to set the import preferences to whatever rate and bit-depth, then high-lite all the tracks and use the "covert to..." function (it's in one of the menus).

If you're authoring a DVD you will need to create 48Khz, 16 bit AIFF files or AC3 compressed files (which iTunes won;t do, but Compressor will).

Are you makiing a DVD-v to play in a DVD video player, a DVD-a or a data DVD to store the files?

virilep
Aug 2, 2009, 03:03 PM
Put them into iTunes and us the convert function to change them all into whatever you want, you'll just have to set the import preferences to whatever rate and bit-depth, then high-lite all the tracks and use the "covert to..." function (it's in one of the menus).

If you're authoring a DVD you will need to create 48Khz, 16 bit AIFF files or AC3 compressed files (which iTunes won;t do, but Compressor will).

Are you makiing a DVD-v to play in a DVD video player, a DVD-a or a data DVD to store the files?

I tried doing it in Itunes but the setting always change when I try to change the bitrate to 32 and the sampling. I went from AAC to flac

I'm using the DVD-audiofile program. I wish there was an easier way to do it.

Toast won't make DVD-a's...

=/

dmbfan41
Aug 5, 2009, 08:38 PM
I use Sample Manager...